Remember Rowhammer; it has a long enough memory to remember you

Subject: General Tech | May 10, 2018 - 02:05 PM |
Tagged: rowhammer, security, throwhammer

Rowhammer dates back to 2015, a vulnerability which is able to flip bits in DRAM and NAND.  An enterprising attacker could use it to target page table entries which would allow them to gain root access to Linux machines, but it was a local attack and could not be performed remotely ... until now.  Researchers have discovered a new way to exploit this vector using carefully crafted network packages to attack high end network cards which utilize remote direct memory access.  That feature is very handy, allowing the network card to move large amounts of data without taking CPU cycles but it is vulnerable to this new attack.  Drop by Ars Technica for all the depressing details about Throwhammer.

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"For the first time, researchers have exploited the Rowhammer memory-chip weakness using nothing more than network packets sent over a local area network. The advance is likely to further lower the bar for triggering bit flips that change critical pieces of data stored on vulnerable computers and servers."

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Source: Ars Technica