It's an Epic post-apocalyptic GPU Exodus

Subject: General Tech | February 13, 2019 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: Metro Exodus, gaming, nvidia, amd, DLSS, ray tracing

The Guru of 3D took over two dozen cards on the Metro, with a focus on the DX12 render path with DX-R support which does make the NVIDIA results a bit more interesting for now.  If you are looking to play at 1080p with every bell and whistle on, you can scrape by on a GTX 1080 or Vega 56 but you should really consider bumping that to an RTX 2070 or Vega 64.  For 1440p gamers the new Radeon VII is capable of providing a good experience but you are far better off with an RTX 2080 or better. 

At 4k, well, even the RTX 2080 Ti can barely make 50fps, with the rest of the pack reaching 40fps at best.  As to the effects of DLSS and ray tracing on the visual quality and overall performance? Read on to see for yourself.

metroexodus_2019_02_11_18_00_57_304.jpg

"A game title of discussion and debate, yes Metro Exodus for the PC is here, and we're going to put it to the test with close to 30 graphics cards in relation to framerates, frame times and CPU scaling."

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Source: Guru of 3D

Slow light, testing ray tracing performance with Port Royal

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 14, 2019 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: 3dmark, port royal, ray tracing

3D Mark recently released an inexpensive update to their benchmarking suite to let you test your ray tracing performance; you can grab Port Royal for a few dollars from Steam.  As there has been limited time to use the benchmark as well as a small sample of GPUs which can properly run it, it has not yet made it into most benchmarking suites.  Bjorn3D took the time to install it on a decent system and tested the performance of the Titan and the five RTX cards available on the market. 

As you can see, it is quite the punishing test, not even NVIDIA's flagship card can maintain 60fps.

3DMark-Port-Royal-screenshot-3-1024x576.jpg

"3DMark is finally updated with its newest benchmark designed specifically to test real time ray tracing performance. The benchmark we are looking at today is Port Royal, it is the first really good repeatable benchmark I have seen available that tests new real time ray tracing features."

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Source: Bjorn3D

Your CPU wants to help with ray tracing as well?

Subject: General Tech | January 9, 2019 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: gaming, battlefield V, ray tracing, RTX 2080, RTX 2070

[H]ard|OCP have been spending a lot of time with Battlefield V, determining the effect of enabling ray tracing on performance.  In their latest look, they compare the effect of running the game on an i9-9700K running at 4.6GHz versus an i7-7700K at 5GHz.  Their results are quite clear, when testing they saw a performance difference between 1-1.5 fps; well within the margin of error. 

When it comes to BFV, your CPU is not the limiter on your performance.

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"We have been doing some deep dives into playing Battlefield V 64-person multiplayer lately and testing what exactly the cost of using NVIDIA Ray Tracing is in terms of framerate performance using new NVIDIA RTX 2070 and RTX 2080 cards. We did get questioned on using a 5GHz overclocked 7700K instead of the suggested CPU that EA recommends."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

NVIDIA Announces the GeForce RTX 2060 for Next Gen Gaming

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 7, 2019 - 01:59 AM |
Tagged: video card, RTX 2060, rtx, ray tracing, nvidia, graphics, gpu, geforce, ces 2019, CES

On stage at an event tonight at CES 2019, NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang made it offical: the RTX 2060 exists and will be available this month. The card is priced at $349, and is based on the same Turing architecture as the rest of the RTX family.

geforce-rtx-2060-2.jpg

The RTX 2060 was announced with 6GB of GDDR6 memory, and like its bigger siblings the RTX 2060 offers ray tracing support (with 240 Tensor Cores onboard), and NVIDIA targets 60 FPS performance with ray tracing enabled in Battlefield V:

"The RTX 2060 is 60 percent faster on current titles than the prior-generation GTX 1060, NVIDIA’s most popular GPU, and beats the gameplay of the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti. With Turing’s RT Cores and Tensor Cores, it can run Battlefield V with ray tracing at 60 frames per second."

geforce-rtx-2060-1.jpg

That 60% increase comes from benchmarks the company ran using 2560x1440 resolution, and the RTX 2060 is targeting resolutions from the mainstream 1920x1080 up to 2560x1440, though with performance between a GTX 1070 and 1080 the RTX 2060 could very well support 3840x2160 gaming at medium-to-high settings as well.

geforce-rtx-2060-3.jpg

The official launch of the RTX 2060 is January 15 from add-in partners, as well as a Founders Edition card from NVIDIA beginning on that date. NVIDIA is also launching a new bundle deal. Qualifying RTX 2060 purchasers, either as a standalone card or as part of a desktop including the RTX 2060, can choose to receive either Battlefield V or the upcoming Anthem for free.

Stay tuned for more details on the GeForce RTX 2060 soon.

Source: NVIDIA

3DMark Port Royal Ray Tracing Benchmark Launches January 8th

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 10, 2018 - 10:36 AM |
Tagged: 3dmark, ray tracing, directx raytracing, raytracing, rtx, benchmarking, benchmarks

After first announcing it last month, UL this weekend provided new information on its upcoming ray tracing-focused addition to the 3DMark benchmarking suite. Port Royal, what UL calls the "world's first dedicated real-time ray tracing benchmark for gamers," will launch Tuesday, January 8, 2019.

For those eager for a glimpse of the new ray-traced visual spectacle, or for the majority of gamers without a ray tracing-capable GPU, the company has released a video preview of the complete Port Royal demo scene.

Access to the new Port Royal benchmark will be limited to the Advanced and Professional editions of 3DMark. Existing 3DMark users can upgrade to the benchmark for $2.99, and it will become part of the base $29.99 Advanced Edition package for new purchasers starting January 8th.

Real-time ray tracing promises to bring new levels of realism to in-game graphics. Port Royal uses DirectX Raytracing to enhance reflections, shadows, and other effects that are difficult to achieve with traditional rendering techniques.

As well as benchmarking performance, 3DMark Port Royal is a realistic and practical example of what to expect from ray tracing in upcoming games— ray tracing effects running in real-time at reasonable frame rates at 2560 × 1440 resolution.

3DMark Port Royal was developed with input from AMD, Intel, NVIDIA, and other leading technology companies. We worked especially closely with Microsoft to create a first-class implementation of the DirectX Raytracing API.

Port Royal will run on any graphics card with drivers that support DirectX Raytracing. As with any new technology, there are limited options for early adopters, but more cards are expected to get DirectX Raytracing support in 2019.

3DMark can be acquired via Steam or directly from UL's online store. The Advanced Edition, which includes access to all benchmarks, is priced at $29.99.

NVIDIA Announces GeForce RTX 2070 Availability

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 25, 2018 - 02:19 PM |
Tagged: turing, tensor cores, rtx, ray tracing, nvidia, 2080 Ti, 2080, 2070

Earlier today, via a surprise message on Twitter, NVIDIA has officially announced the availability date for the RTX 2070—October 17th.

Based on the Turing microarchitecture, the RTX 2070 will include the same RT cores for Ray Tracing and Tensor Cores for deep learning as the RTX and 2080 Ti, albeit in different quantities.

  RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 RTX 2070
GPU TU102 TU104 ?
GPU Cores 4352 2944 2304
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1515 MHz 1410 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1710 MHz/ 1800 MHz (FE) 1620 MHz / 1710 MHz (FE)
Texture Units 272 184 ?
ROP Units 88 64 ?
Tensor Cores 544 268 ?
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 8 GRays/s 6 GRays/s
Memory 11GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz 14000 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G6
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s
TDP 250 W /
260 W (FE)
215W / 225W (FE)  175 W / 185 W (FE)
Peak Compute (FP32) 13.4 TFLOPS / 14.2 TFLOP (FE) 10 TFLOPS / 10.6 TFLOPS (FE) ?
Transistor Count 18.6 B 13.6 B ?
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 12nm
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$800 (FE) / $700 $599 (FE) / $499

While we don't have a full looks at the specifications yet, NVIDIA has posted some technical aspects on the RTX 2070 product page.

The RTX 2070 Founders Edition will be available for $599, with partners cards "starting" at $499.

Source: NVIDIA

Goodbye NDA, hello RTXs!

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 19, 2018 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: turing, tu102, RTX 2080 Ti, rtx, ray tracing, nvidia, gtx, geforce, founders edition, DLSS

Today is the day the curtain is pulled back and the performance of NVIDIA's Turing based consumer cards is revealed.  If there was a benchmark, resolution or game that was somehow missed in our review then you will find it below, but make sure to peek in at the last page for a list of the games which will support Ray Tracing, DLSS or both! 

The Tech Report found that the RTX 2080 Ti is an amazing card to use if you are playing Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice as it clearly outperforms cards from previous generations as well as the base RTX 2080.  In many cases the RTX 2080 matches the GTX 1080 Ti, though with the extra features it is an attractive card for those with GPUs several generations old.  There is one small problem for those looking to adopt one of these cards, we have not seen prices like these outside of the Titan series before now.

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"Nvidia's Turing architecture is here on board the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, and we put it through its paces for 4K HDR gaming with some of today's most cutting-edge titles. We also explore the possibilities of Nvidia's Deep Learning Super-Sampling tech for the future of 4K gaming. Join us as we put Turing to the test."

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Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

New Generation, New Founders Edition

At this point, it seems that calling NVIDIA's 20-series GPUs highly anticipated would be a bit of an understatement. Between months and months of speculation about what these new GPUs would be called, what architecture they would be based off, and what features they would bring, the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti were officially unveiled in August, alongside the Turing architecture.

DSC05181.JPG

We've already posted our deep dive into the Turing architecture and the TU 102 and TU 104 GPUs powering these new graphics cards, but here's a short take away. Turing provides efficiency improvements in both memory and shader performance, as well as adds additional specialized hardware to accelerate both deep learning (Tensor cores), and enable real-time ray tracing (RT cores).

  RTX 2080 Ti Quadro RTX 6000 GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  Quadro RTX 5000 GTX 1080 TITAN V RX Vega 64 (Air)
GPU TU102 TU102 GP102 TU104 TU104 GP104 GV100 Vega 64
GPU Cores 4352 4608 3584 2944 3072 2560 5120 4096
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1455 MHz 1408 MHz 1515 MHz 1620 MHz 1607 MHz 1200 MHz 1247 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1770 MHz 1582 MHz 1710 MHz/
1800 MHz (FE)
1820 MHz 1733 MHz 1455 MHz 1546 MHz
Texture Units 272 288 224 184 192 160 320 256
ROP Units 88 96 88 64 64 64 96 64
Tensor Cores 544 576 -- 368 384 -- 640 --
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 8 GRays/s -- -- --
Memory 11GB 24GB 11GB 8GB 16GB 8GB 12GB  8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  10000 MHz 1700 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 384-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 3072-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 672GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 653 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 W/
260 W (FE)
260 W 250 watts 215W
225W (FE)
230 W 180 watts 250W 292
Peak Compute (FP32) 13.4 TFLOPS / 14.2 TFLOP (FE) 16.3 TFLOPS 10.6 TFLOPS 10 TFLOPS / 10.6 TFLOPS (FE) 11.2 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 14.9 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS
Transistor Count 18.6 B 18.6B 12.0 B 13.6 B 13.6 B 7.2 B 21.0 B 12.5 B
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 14nm
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$6,300 $699 $800/
$700
$2,300 $549 $2,999 $499

 

As unusual as it is for them NVIDIA has decided to release both the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti at the same time, as the first products in the Turing family. 

The TU102-based RTX 2080 Ti features 4352 CUDA cores, while the TU104-based RTX 2080 features 2944, less than the GTX 1080 Ti. Also, these new RTX GPUs have moved to GDDR6 from the GDDR5X we found on the GTX 10-series.

DSC05175.JPG

Click here to continue reading our review of the RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti.

Realtime Raytracing Commit Spotted in Unity GitHub

Subject: General Tech | September 14, 2018 - 10:32 PM |
Tagged: rtx, Unity, ray tracing, directx raytracing, DirectX 12

As Ken wrote up his take in a separate post, NVIDIA has made Turing architecture details public, which will bring real-time ray tracing to PC gaming later this month. When it was announced, NVIDIA had some demos in Unreal Engine 4, and a few partnered games (Battlefield V, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Metro Exodus) showed off their implementations.

As we expected, Unity is working on supporting it too.

unity-2018-book-of-the-dead.jpg

Not ray tracing, but from the same project at Unity.

The first commit showed up on Unity’s GitHub for their Scriptable Render Pipelines project, dated earlier today. Looking through the changes, it appears to just generate the acceleration structure based on the objects of type renderer in the current scene (as well as define the toggle properties of course). It looks like we are still a long way out.

I’m looking forward to ray tracing implementations, though. I tend to like art styles with anisotropic metal trims and soft shadows, which is difficult to get right with rasterization alone due to the reliance on other objects in the scene. In the case of metal, reflections dominate the look and feel of the material. In the case of soft shadows, you really need to keep track of how much of a light has been blocked between the rendered fragment and the non-point light.

And yes, it will depend on the art style, but mine just happens to be computationally expensive.