NVIDIA Announces GeForce RTX 2070, RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti at Gamescom 2018

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 01:58 PM |
Tagged: turing, tensor cores, rtx 2080ti, RTX 2080, RTX 2070, rtx, rt cores, ray tracing, quadro, preorder, nvidia, gtx, geforce

Amazon.com has its preorder and product listing pages for the various GeForce RTX cards live!

* Update *

NVIDIA's pre-order page is now live, as well as info on the RTX 2070! Details below:

2018-08-20-13-22-43-.png

*Update 2 *

Post-Founders Edition pricing comes in a bit lower than the Founders pricing noted above:

2018-08-20-13-59-58-.png

* End update *

Much to no one's surprise after the launch of the Quadro RTX lineup and the many subsequent leaks, today NVIDIA officially announced their next generation GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti gaming GPUs.

Just like we saw with the Quadro RTX lineup, NVIDIA is designating these gaming-oriented graphics card with the RTX brand to emphasize their capabilities with ray tracing.

Through the combination of dedicated Ray Tracing  (RT) cores and Tensor cores for AI-powered denoising, NVIDIA is claiming these RTX GPUs are capable of high enough ray tracing performance to be used real-time in games, as shown by their demos of titles of Battlefield V, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Metro: Exodus.

Not every GPU in NVIDIA's lineup will be capable of this real-time ray tracing performance, with those lower tier cards retaining the traditional GTX branding.

Here are the specifications as we know them so far compared to the Quadro RTX cards, as well as the previous generation GeForce cards, and the top offering from AMD.

  RTX 2080 Ti Quadro RTX 6000 GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  Quadro RTX 5000 GTX 1080 TITAN V RX Vega 64 (Air) RTX 2070
GPU TU102 TU102 GP102 TU104 TU104 GP104 GV100 Vega 64 ?
GPU Cores 4352 4608 3584 2944 3072 2560 5120 4096 2304
Base Clock 1350 ? 1408 MHz 1515 ? 1607 MHz 1200 MHz 1247 MHz 1410
Boost Clock 1545
1635 FE
? 1582 MHz 1710
1800 FE
? 1733 MHz 1455 MHz 1546 MHz 1620
1710 FE
Texture Units ? ? 224 ? ? 160 320 256 ?
ROP Units ? ? 88 ? ? 64 96 64 ?
Tensor Cores 576 576 -- 384 384 -- 640 -- ?
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 6? GRays/s -- -- -- 6 GRays/s
Memory 11GB 24GB 11GB 8GB 16GB 8GB 12GB  8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  10000 MHz 1700 MHz 1890 MHz 14000 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 384-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 3072-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 256-bit G6
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 672GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 653 GB/s 484 GB/s 448GB/s
TDP 250W
260 FE
300 watts 250 watts 215W
225W FE
? 180 watts 250W 292 175W
185 FE
Peak Compute ? ? 10.6 TFLOPS ? ? 8.2 TFLOPS 14.9 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS ?
Transistor Count ? ? 12.0 B ? ? 7.2 B 21.0 B 12.5 B ?
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 14nm ?
MSRP (current) $1200/
$1000
$6,300 $699 $800/
$700
$2,300 $549 $2,999 $499

$600/
$500

We hope to fill out the rest of the information on these GPUs in the coming days during subsequent press briefings during Gamescom.

One big change to the RTX lineup is NVIDIA's revised Founders Edition cards. Instead of the blower-style cooler that we've seen on every other NVIDIA reference design, the Founder's Edition RTX cards instead move to a dual-axial fan setup, similar to 3rd party designs in the past.

These new GPUs do not come cheaply, however, with an increased MSRP across the entire lineup when compared to the 1000-series cards. The RTX 2080 Ti's MSRP of $1200 is an increase of $500 over the previous generation GTX 1080 Ti, while the GTX 2080 sports a $200 increase over the GTX 2080. These prices will come down after the Founders Edition wave pricing passes (the same was done with the GTX 10xx launches).

Both the Founder's Edition card from NVIDIA, as well as third-party designs from partners such as EVGA and ASUS, are available for preorder from retailers including Amazon and Newegg starting today and are set to ship on August 27th.

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA Officially Announces Turing GPU Architecture at SIGGRAPH 2018

Subject: General Tech | August 13, 2018 - 07:43 PM |
Tagged: turing, siggraph 2018, rtx, quadro rtx 8000, quadro rtx 6000, quadro rtx 5000, quadro, nvidia

Today at the professional graphics-focused SIGGRAPH conference, NVIDIA's Jen-Hsun Huang has unveiled details on their much-rumored next GPU architecture, codenamed Turing.

NVIDIA_Turing_Architecture_1534184555.png

At the core of the Turing architecture are what NVIDIA is referring these as two "engines"– one for accelerating Ray Tracing, and the other for accelerating AI Inferencing.

The Ray Tracing units are called RT cores and are not to be confused with the announcement of NVIDIA RTX technology for real-time ray-tracing that we saw at GDC this year. There, NVIDIA was using their Optix AI-powered denoising filter to clean up ray-traced images, allowing them to save on rendering resources, but the actual ray-tracing was still being done on the GPU cores itself.

Now, these RT cores will perform the ray calculations themselves at what NVIDIA is claiming is up to 10 GigaRays/second, or up to 25X the performance of the current Pascal architecture.

Volta-Tensor-Core.jpg

Just like we saw in the Volta-based Quadro GV100, these new Quadro RTX cards will also feature Tensor Cores for deep learning acceleration. It is unclear if these tensor cores remain unchanged from what we saw in Volta or not.

In addition to the RT Cores and Tensor Units, Turing also features an all-new design for the tradition Streaming Multiprocessor (SM) GPU units. Changes include an integer execution unit executing in parallel with the floating point datapath, and a new unified cache architecture with double the bandwidth of the previous generation.

NVIDIA claims these changes combined with the up to 4,608 available CUDA cores in the highest configuration will enable up to 16 TFLOPS and 16 trillion integer operations per second.

quadro-rtx-lineup.png

Alongside the announcement of the Turing Architecture, NVIDIA unveiled the Quadro RTX 5000, 6000, 8000-series products, due in Q4 2018.

In addition to the announcements at SIGGRAPH tonight, NVIDIA is expected to announce the consumer, GeForce products featuring the Turing architecture next week at an event in Germany

PC Perspective is at both SIGGRAPH and will be at NVIDIA's event in Germany next week so stay tuned for more details!

Source: NVIDIA

GTC 2018: NVIDIA Announces Volta-Powered Quadro GV100

Subject: General Tech | March 27, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, GTC, quadro, gv100, GP100, tesla, titan v, v100, votla

One of the big missing markets for NVIDIA with their slow rollout of the Volta architecture was professional workstations. Today, NVIDIA announced they are bringing Volta to the Quadro family with the Quadro GV100 card.

27-gv100-gpu.jpg

Powered by the same GV100 GPU that announced at last year's GTC in the Tesla V100, and late last year in the Titan V, the Quadro GV100 represents a leap forward in computing power for workstation-level applications. While these users could currently be using TITAN V for similar workloads, as we've seen in the past, Quadro drivers generally provide big performance advantages in these sorts of applications. Although, we'd love to see NVIDIA repeat their move of bringing these optimizations to the TITAN lineup as they did with the TITAN Xp.

As it is a Quadro, we would expect this to be NVIDIA's first Volta-powered product which provides certified, professional driver code paths for applications such as CATIA, Solidedge, and more.

quadro-gv100.png

NVIDIA also heavily promoted the idea of using two of these GV100 cards in one system, utilizing NVLink. Considering the lack of NVLink support for the TITAN V, this is also the first time we've seen a Volta card with display outputs supporting NVLink in more standard workstations.

More importantly, this announcement brings NVIDIA's RTX technology to the professional graphics market. 

With popular rendering applications like V-Ray already announcing and integrating support for NVIDIA's Optix Raytracing denoiser in their beta branch, it seems only a matter of time before we'll see a broad suite of professional applications supporting RTX technology for real-time. For example, raytraced renders of items being designed in CAD and modeling applications. 

This sort of speed represents a potential massive win for professional users, who won't have to waste time waiting for preview renderings to complete to continue iterating on their projects.

The NVIDIA Quadro GV100 is available now directly from NVIDIA now for a price of $8,999, which puts it squarely in the same price range of the previous highest-end Quadro GP100. 

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA addresses Spectre vulnerabilities

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | January 5, 2018 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: meltdown, spectre, geforce, quadro, NVS, nvidia, tesla, security

If you were wondering if NVIDIA products are vulnerable to some of the latest security threats, the answer is yes.  Your Shield device or GPU is not vulnerable to CVE-2017-5754, aka Meltdown, however the two variants of Spectre could theoretically be used to infect you. 

  • Variant 1 (CVE-2017-5753): Mitigations are provided with the security update included in this bulletin. NVIDIA expects to work together with its ecosystem partners on future updates to further strengthen mitigations.

  • Variant 2 (CVE-2017-5715): Mitigations are provided with the security update included in this bulletin. NVIDIA expects to work together with its ecosystem partners on future updates to further strengthen mitigations.

  • Variant 3 (CVE-2017-5754): At this time, NVIDIA has no reason to believe that Shield TV/tablet is vulnerable to this variant.

The Android based Shield tablet should be updated to Shield Experience 5.4, which should arrive before the end of the month.  Your Shield TV, should you actually still have a working on will receive Shield Experience 6.3 along the same time frame.

The GPU is a little more complex as there are several product lines and OSes which need to be dealt with.  There should be a new GeForce driver appearing early next week for gaming GPUs, with HPC cards receiving updates on the dates you can see below.

nvidia patch.PNG

There is no reason to expect Radeon and Vega GPUs to suffer from these issues at this time.  Intel could learn a bit from NVIDIA's response, which has been very quick and includes ther older hardware.

Source: NVIDIA

GTC 17: NVIDIA Demos (Professional) Multi-User VR

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 9, 2017 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: VR, quadro, nvidia, gp102

Four Quadro P6000s installed in a single server, which looks like a 4U rack-mounted box, are shown running four HTC Vive Business Edition VR systems through virtual machines. It isn’t designed to be a shipping product, just a demo for NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference that was developed by their engineers, but that should get the attention of this trade show’s attendees, who are mostly enterprise-focused.

nvidia-2017-fouruservrserver.png

For context, this system has roughly equivalent GPU horsepower to four Titan Xps, albeit with twice the RAM and slightly different clocks; there’s plenty of power per headset to harness. Still, running this level of high-performance application on a virtual machine could be useful in a variety of business applications, from architectural visualization to, as NVIDIA notes, amusement parks.

Given that it’s just a proof-of-concept demo, you’ll need to build it yourself to get one. They didn’t mention using any special software, though.

Source: NVIDIA
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Overview

Since the launch of NVIDIA's Pascal architecture with the GTX 1070 and 1080 last May, we've taken a look at a lot of Pascal-based products, including the recent launch of the GTX 1080 Ti. By now, it is clear that Pascal has proven itself in a gaming context.

One frequent request we get about GPU coverage is to look at professional uses cases for these sort of devices. While gaming is still far and away the most common use for GPUs, things like high-quality rendering in industries like architecture, and new industries like deep learning can see vast benefits from acceleration by GPUs.

Today, we are taking a look at some of the latest NVIDIA Quadro GPUs on the market, the Quadro P2000, P4000, and P5000. 

DSC02752.JPG

Diving deep into the technical specs of these Pascal-based Quadro products and the AMD competitor we will be testing,  we find a wide range of compute capability, power consumption, and price.

  Quadro P2000 Quadro P4000 Quadro P5000 Radeon Pro Duo
Process 16nm 16nm 16nm 28nm
Code Name GP106 GP104 GP104 Fiji XT x 2
Shaders 1024 1792 2560 8192
Rated Clock Speed 1470 MHz (Boost) 1480 MHz (Boost) 1730 MHz (Boost) up to 1000 MHz
Memory Width 160-bit 256-bit 256-bit 4096-bit (HBM) x 2
Compute Perf (FP32) 3.0 TFLOPS 5.3 TFLOPS 8.9 TFLOPS 16.38 TFLOPS
Compute Perf (FP64) 1/32 FP32 1/32 FP32 1/32 FP 32 1/16 FP32
Frame Buffer 5GB 8GB 16GB 8GB (4GB x 2)
TDP 75W 105W 180W 350W
Street Price $599 $900 $2000 $800

The astute readers will notice similarities to the NVIDIA GeForce line of products as they take a look at these specifications.

Continue to read our roundup of 3 Pascal Quadro Graphics Cards

NVIDIA Announces Q4 2017 Results

Subject: Editorial | February 9, 2017 - 06:59 PM |
Tagged: TSMC, Samsung, Results, quadro, Q4, nvidia, Intel, geforce, Drive PX2, amd, 2017, 2016

It is most definitely quarterly reports time for our favorite tech firms.  NVIDIA’s is unique with their fiscal vs. calendar year as compared to how AMD and Intel report.  This has to do when NVIDIA had their first public offering and set the fiscal quarters ahead quite a few months from the actual calendar.  So when NVIDIA announces Q4 2017, it is actually reflecting the Q4 period in 2016.  Clear as mud?

Semantics aside, NVIDIA had a record quarter.  Gross revenue was an impressive $2.173 billion US.  This is up slightly more than $700 million from the previous Q4.  NVIDIA has shown amazing growth during this time attributed to several factors.  Net income (GAAP) is at $655 million.  This again is a tremendous amount of profit for a company that came in just over $2 billion in revenue.  We can compare this to AMD’s results two weeks ago that hit $1.11 billion in revenue and a loss of $51 million for the quarter.  Consider that AMD provides CPUs, chipsets, and GPUs to the market and is the #2 x86 manufacturer in the world.

NVLogo_2D_H.jpg

The yearly results were just as impressive.  FY 2017 featured record revenue and net income.  Revenue was $6.91 billion as compare to FY 2016 at $5 billion.  Net income for the year was $1.666 billion with comparison to $614 million for FY 2016.  The growth for the entire year is astounding, and certainly the company had not seen an expansion like this since the early 2000s.

The core strength of the company continues to be gaming.  Gaming GPUs and products provided $1.348 billion in revenue by themselves.  Since the manufacturing industry was unable to provide a usable 20 nm planar product for large, complex ASICs companies such as NVIDIA and AMD were forced to innovate in design to create new products with greater feature sets and performance, all the while still using the same 28 nm process as previous products.  Typically process shrinks accounted for the majority of improvements (more transistors packed into a smaller area with corresponding switching speed increases).  Many users kept cards that were several years old due to there not being a huge impetus to upgrade.  With the arrival of the 14 nm and 16 nm processes from Samsung and TSMC respectively, users suddenly had a very significant reason to upgrade.  NVIDIA was able to address the entire market from high to low with their latest GTX 10x0 series of products.  AMD on the other hand only had new products that hit the midrange and budget markets.

NV-Q4-2014.jpg

The next biggest area for NVIDIA is that of the datacenter.  This has seen tremendous growth as compared to the other markets (except of course gaming) that NVIDIA covers.  It has gone from around $97 million in Q4 2016 up to $296 million this last quarter.  Tripling revenue in any one area is rare.  Gaming “only” about doubled during this same time period.  Deep learning and AI are two areas that required this type of compute power and NVIDIA was able to deliver a comprehensive software stack, as well as strategic partnerships that provided turnkey solutions for end users.

After datacenter we still have the visualization market based on the Quadro products.  This area has not seen the dramatic growth as other aspects of the company, but it remains a solid foundation and a good money maker for the firm.  The Quadro products continue to be improved upon and software support grows.

One area that promises to really explode in the next three to four years is the automotive sector.  The Drive PX2 system is being integrated into a variety of cars and NVIDIA is focused on providing a solid and feature packed solution for manufacturers.  Auto-pilot and “co-pilot” modes will become more and more important in upcoming models and should reach wide availability by 2020, if not a little sooner.  NVIDIA is working with some of the biggest names in the industry from both automakers and parts suppliers.  BMW should release a fully automated driving system later this year with their i8 series.  Audi also has higher end cars in the works that will utilize NVIDIA hardware and fully automated operation.  If NVIDIA continues to expand here, eventually it could become as significant a source of income as gaming is today.

There was one bit of bad news from the company.  Their OEM & IP division has seen several drops over the past several quarters.  NVIDIA announced that the IP licensing to Intel would be discontinued this quarter and would not be renewed.  We know that AMD has entered into an agreement with Intel to provide graphics IP to the company in future parts and to cover Intel in potential licensing litigation.  This was a fair amount of money per quarter for NVIDIA, but their other divisions more than made up for the loss of this particular income.

NVIDIA certainly seems to be hitting on all cylinders and is growing into markets that previously were unavailable as of five to ten years ago.  They are spreading out their financial base so as to avoid boom and bust cycles of any one industry.  Next quarter NVIDIA expects revenue to be down seasonally into the $1.9 billion range.  Even though that number is down, it would still represent the 3rd highest quarterly revenue.

Source: NVIDIA

Podcast #436 - ECS Mini-STX, NVIDIA Quadro, AMD Zen Arch, Optane, GDDR6 and more!

Subject: Editorial | February 9, 2017 - 10:50 AM |
Tagged: podcast, Zen, Windows 10 Game Mode, webcam, ryzen, quadro, Optane, nvidia, mini-stx, humble bundle, gddr6, evga, ECS, atom, amd, 4k

PC Perspective Podcast #436 - 02/09/17

Join us for ECS Mini-STX, NVIDIA Quadro, AMD Zen Arch, Optane, GDDR6 and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Allyn Malventano, Ken Addison, Josh Walrath, Jermey Hellstrom

Program length: 1:32:21

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
    1. 1:14:00 Zen Price Points Leaked
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
  4. Closing/outro
 
 

Source:

Lenovo Announces new ThinkPad P51s P51 and P71 Mobile Workstations

Subject: Systems, Mobile | February 6, 2017 - 03:37 PM |
Tagged: xeon, Thinkpad, quadro, P71, P51s, P51, nvidia, notebook, mobile workstation, Lenovo, kaby lake, core i7

Lenovo has announced a trio of new ThinkPad mobile workstations, featuring updated Intel 7th-generation Core (Kaby Lake) processors and NVIDIA Quadro graphics, and among these is the thinnest and lightest ThinkPad mobile workstation to date in the P51s.

P51s.jpg

"Engineered to deliver breakthrough levels of performance, reliability and long battery life, the ThinkPad P51s features a new chassis, designed to meet customer demands for a powerful but portable machine. Developed with engineers and professional designers in mind, this mobile workstation features Intel’s 7th generation Core i7 processors and the latest NVIDIA Quadro dedicated workstation graphics, as well as a 4K UHD IPS display with optional IR camera."

Lenovo says that the ThinkPad P51s is more than a half pound lighter than the previous generation (P50s), stating that "the P51s is the lightest and thinnest mobile workstation ever developed by ThinkPad" at 14.4 x 9.95 x 0.79 inches, and weight starting at 4.3 lbs.

Specs for the P51s include:

  • Up to a 7th Generation Intel Core i7 Processor
  • NVIDIA Quadro M520M Graphics
  • Choice of standard or touchscreen FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, or 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) IPS display
  • Up to 32 GB DDR4 2133 RAM (2x SODIMM slots)
  • Storage options including up to 1 TB (5400 rpm) HDD and 1 TB NVMe PCIe SSDs
  • USB-C with Intel Thunderbolt 3
  • 802.11ac and LTE-A wireless connectivity

Lenovo also announced the ThinkPad P51, which is slightly larger than the P51s, but brings the option of Intel Xeon E3-v6 processors (in addition to Kaby Lake Core i7 CPUs), Quadro M2200M graphics, faster 2400 MHz memory up to 64 GB (4x SODIMM slots), and up to a 4K IPS display with X-Rite Pantone color calibration.

Thinkpad_P51.jpg

Finally there is the new VR-ready P71 mobile workstation, which offers up to an NVIDIA Quadro P5000M GPU along with Oculus and HTC VR certification.

"Lenovo is also bringing virtual reality to life with the new ThinkPad P71. One of the most talked about technologies today, VR has the ability to bring a new visual perspective and immersive experience to our customers’ workflow. In our new P71, the NVIDIA Pascal-based Quadro GPUs offer a stunning level of performance never before seen in a mobile workstation, and it comes equipped with full Oculus and HTC certifications, along with NVIDIA’s VR-ready certification."

Thinkpad_P71.jpg

Pricing and availability is as follows:

  • ThinkPad P51s, starting at $1049, March
  • ThinkPad P51, starting at $1399, April
  • ThinkPad P71, starting at $1849, April
Source: Lenovo
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

NVIDIA P100 comes to Quadro

At the start of the SOLIDWORKS World conference this week, NVIDIA took the cover off of a handful of new Quadro cards targeting professional graphics workloads. Though the bulk of NVIDIA’s discussion covered lower cost options like the Quadro P4000, P2000, and below, the most interesting product sits at the high end, the Quadro GP100.

As you might guess from the name alone, the Quadro GP100 is based on the GP100 GPU, the same silicon used on the Tesla P100 announced back in April of 2016. At the time, the GP100 GPU was specifically billed as an HPC accelerator for servers. It had a unique form factor with a passive cooler that required additional chassis fans. Just a couple of months later, a PCIe version of the GP100 was released under the Tesla GP100 brand with the same specifications.

quadro2017-2.jpg

Today that GPU hardware gets a third iteration as the Quadro GP100. Let’s take a look at the Quadro GP100 specifications and how it compares to some recent Quadro offerings.

  Quadro GP100 Quadro P6000 Quadro M6000 Full GP100
GPU GP100 GP102 GM200 GP100 (Pascal)
SMs 56 60 48 60
TPCs 28 30 24 (30?)
FP32 CUDA Cores / SM 64 64 64 64
FP32 CUDA Cores / GPU 3584 3840 3072 3840
FP64 CUDA Cores / SM 32 2 2 32
FP64 CUDA Cores / GPU 1792 120 96 1920
Base Clock 1303 MHz 1417 MHz 1026 MHz TBD
GPU Boost Clock 1442 MHz 1530 MHz 1152 MHz TBD
FP32 TFLOPS (SP) 10.3 12.0 7.0 TBD
FP64 TFLOPS (DP) 5.15 0.375 0.221 TBD
Texture Units 224 240 192 240
ROPs 128? 96 96 128?
Memory Interface 1.4 Gbps
4096-bit HBM2
9 Gbps
384-bit GDDR5X
6.6 Gbps
384-bit
GDDR5
4096-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 716 GB/s 432 GB/s 316.8 GB/s ?
Memory Size 16GB 24 GB 12GB 16GB
TDP 235 W 250 W 250 W TBD
Transistors 15.3 billion 12 billion 8 billion 15.3 billion
GPU Die Size 610mm2 471 mm2 601 mm2 610mm2
Manufacturing Process 16nm 16nm 28nm 16nm

There are some interesting stats here that may not be obvious at first glance. Most interesting is that despite the pricing and segmentation, the GP100 is not the de facto fastest Quadro card from NVIDIA depending on your workload. With 3584 CUDA cores running at somewhere around 1400 MHz at Boost speeds, the single precision (32-bit) rating for GP100 is 10.3 TFLOPS, less than the recently released P6000 card. Based on GP102, the P6000 has 3840 CUDA cores running at something around 1500 MHz for a total of 12 TFLOPS.

gp102-blockdiagram.jpg

GP100 (full) Block Diagram

Clearly the placement for Quadro GP100 is based around its 64-bit, double precision performance, and its ability to offer real-time simulations on more complex workloads than other Pascal-based Quadro cards can offer. The Quadro GP100 offers 1/2 DP compute rate, totaling 5.2 TFLOPS. The P6000 on the other hand is only capable of 0.375 TLOPS with the standard, consumer level 1/32 DP rate. Inclusion of ECC memory support on GP100 is also something no other recent Quadro card has.

quadro2017-3.jpg

Raw graphics performance and throughput is going to be questionable until someone does some testing, but it seems likely that the Quadro P6000 will still be the best solution for that by at least a slim margin. With a higher CUDA core count, higher clock speeds and equivalent architecture, the P6000 should run games, graphics rendering and design applications very well.

There are other important differences offered by the GP100. The memory system is built around a 16GB HBM2 implementation which means more total memory bandwidth but at a lower capacity than the 24GB Quadro P6000. Offering 66% more memory bandwidth does mean that the GP100 offers applications that are pixel throughput bound an advantage, as long as the compute capability keeps up on the backend.

m.jpg

Continue reading our preview of the new Quadro GP100!