Manufacturer: REEVEN

Introduction and Specifications

The JUSTICE from REEVEN is a tower cooler with six heatpipes, and a 120 mm PWM fan with distinctive yellow-and-black styling. But what really matters is performance, and that’s what we’re going to find out about as we pit it against the Intel Broadwell-E test system.

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Have you heard of REEVEN? A search on Amazon reveals only a pair of older models, but Newegg carries the full range of coolers and fan controllers the Taiwanese company offers. Prices are low for this segment, with their CPU coolers starting at $24.99, and this JUSTICE cooler priced at $42 on Newegg. What you get for this price sounds impressive on paper, and I wasted no time in finding out how that translated into real-world results.

REEVEN sent along a second 120 mm COLDWING 12 fan for us to test with the JUSTICE, as the cooler includes installation hardware for a dual-fan setup, and I tested the cooler with my Core i7-6800K in both configurations - with both stock and overclocked CPU loads.

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Continue reading our review of the REEVEN JUSTICE Tower Air CPU Cooler!

Noctua Releases PWM Controlled NF-A14 140mm Case Fan

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 3, 2013 - 06:32 AM |
Tagged: pwm, noctua, nf-a14, fan

Austrian PC Cooling manufacturer Noctua has released a new fan called the NF-A14. The new fan is PWM controlled and aimed at case or watercooling radiator cooling. The NF-A14 uses a square frame and features higher static pressure than the NF-P13 along with a maximum speed of 1500RPM.

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The fan kit comes with the fan itself, mounting screws, a rubber mounting system to reduce vibration, a 30mm extension cable, low-noise adapter, and a 4-pin Y splitter cable that allows two PWM fans to be connected to a single motherboard fan header. The new Noctua NF-A14 comes with a 6 year warranty.

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You can find more information on Noctua’s website as well as the full press release after the break.

In other cooling news:

Source: Noctua

Who needs software control when you can roll your own fan controller?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2011 - 05:56 PM |
Tagged: fan controller, pwm, DIY

Even with the fancy drivers now that allow you to set a minimum fan speed you will find that it is almost impossible to completely turn the fan off.  If you desire to do so, it is almost impossible to turn the fan completely off, which is something that is almost impossible with either a software solution or with a PWM controller.  Over at Hack a Day you can find instructions on how to create a breadboard project which translates PWM signal to DC and will allow you much greater control over your fan speed.

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"[hedgehoginventions] wrote in to share a little modification he made to his video card in order to keep it from overheating during strenuous 3D tasks. Having swapped out the stock cooler on his Nvidia 9600GT graphics card, he found that it did not need to utilize the fan while doing mundane things like checking email, but that it still required extra air flow while playing games.

He figured he get the fan to shut off by tweaking the PWM signal, but he found that he could not get the duty cycle under 20% using software, which still caused the fan to run at all times. The circuit he built takes the PWM signal output by the card, cleaning it up before converting it to a corresponding DC voltage. The fan then runs at the same speed it would if driven directly by the PWM signal, though it can now turn off completely when not required."

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Source: Hack a Day