Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: Acer

Introduction and Specifications

Acer's Predator Z850 takes the gaming monitor concept to the next level, projecting screen sizes up to 120" from less than two feet from a wall. It offers an ultra-wide 24:9 aspect ratio (at 1920x720), very high 3000 lumen brightness for gaming with ambient light (something projectors didn't used to be able to cope with), and a laser diode illumination system that lasts up to 30,000 hours. It's big, it's red, and you'd better believe it's expensive!


The first thing you need to know about the Predator Z850 is that it's an ultra short-thow projector. This means that unlike standard projectors that need the length of the room, or short-throw projectors that still need a few feet, the Predator Z850 can project a huge image from just inches from a wall. This is a relatively new thing for consumer projectors (unless you count the old rear projection TVs, which used the technology), and there are only a few models with ultra short throw (UST) ranging from the mainstram LG PF1000U, to the $50,000 4K Sony LSPX-W1S.

It's remarkable how UST changes how we think about projection, as the same depth taken up by the average TV table could provide an image larger than nearly any LCD television available, while being easily portable in the process. The Predator Z850 is all about flexibility, combining the inherent UST ability to project massive 120-inch images from less than two feet away, to built-in correction for various colors of wall paint (this could be used with a projection screen, too, of course). The only problem I can forsee as we continue is the price tag, which is $4999.

So how can we justify the price of the Z850? No matter how you slice it $5,000 is a lot of money, and the same investment could build an amazing multi-monitor setup as an alternative. But there really is something about turning an entire wall of your house into a display, and I had a lot of fun playing around with this projector (my wife was sorry it had to go back, as she enjoyed her 100-inch football games on the wall).

Continue reading our review of the Acer Predator Z850 UltraWide Gaming Projector!!

CES 2016: Lenovo ideacentre 610S Micro PC and Projector

Subject: Systems | January 4, 2016 - 07:00 PM |
Tagged: projector, micro projector, Lenovo, ideacentre 610s, ideacentre, CES 2016, CES

The ideacentre 610S is a tiny PC with a triangular shape, designed for the living room (or any situation where a small-footprint computer is needed). But this is more than just a PC, as the 610S is bundled with a TI DLP micro projector.

ideacentre 610S 1.jpg

So what sort of components can be found in a PC / projector combo that combine to stand just a few inches tall? Lenovo provided these specifications (which unfortunately do not list the exact dimensions):

  • System:
    • Up to 6th gen Intel Core i7 processor
    • Up to NVIDIA GTX 750ti 2GB GDDR5 desktop gaming graphics
    • Up to 16GB DDR4 memory (1 x SO-DIMM)
    • Up to 2TB HDD or 128GB SSD
    • WLAN: 802.11ac with Bluetooth 4.0
    • Ports: LAN 10/100/1000, HDMI, 4 x USB 3.0, 3-in-1 card reader (SD/SD/HC/SDXC)
    • Windows 10 Home
    • 2.9 liter volume
  • Projector:
    • TI Micro Projector (220LM, 720P resolution, 100” at 2.4m)
    • WIHD: 60GHz Wireless (with projector module)
    • Chipset: Texas Instrument DLP Chip
    • Audio: 1 x 2w internal speaker. Ports: 1 HDMI-in and 1 USB 2.0
    • Ebony black with a tripod hole on the bottom

ideacentre 610S 2.jpg

In addition to the 35W Intel processors a desktop GPU (the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti) is available as an option for better graphics performance. I/O is good for a small form-factor system like this with 4 USB 3.0 ports, HDMI, and Gigabit LAN, and there is integrated 802.11ac wireless.

The micro projector is a separate device that can be powered through contacts at the top of the 610S (or via AC). It uses a WirelessHD connection to the system and also has an HDMI input, and outputs a 720p image at 220 lumens at up to 100 inches.


The Lenovo ideacentre 610S will retail for $849 with projector included, but won’t be available until June 2016.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at!

Source: Lenovo

Video Perspective: Gigabyte Brix Projector BXPi3-4010 SFF System

Subject: Systems | March 12, 2014 - 07:38 PM |
Tagged: video, SFF, projector, i3-4010u, gigabyte, bxpi3-4010, brix projector, brix

With more than a few of NUC-sized SFF PCs floating around these days, the BRIX Projector, with a catchy model number of BXPi3-4010, has something that no other option can offer: an integrated mini projector.  As the name would imply, the BRIX Projector is part BRIX and part projector, and the combination is unique to the market as far as I can tell.


The guts of the BXPi3-4010 are split seemingly in half between the computer components that make up the BRIX and the DLP LED projector that rests on top.  The processor inside is a Core i3-4010U that runs at up to 1.7 GHz and includes integrated Intel HD 4400 graphics.  With a dual-core HyperThreaded design, the 4010U is competent, but nothing more, for standard application workloads and productivity.  The HD 4400 graphics can run your most basic of games (think Peggle, FTL, Starbound) but isn't up to the task of most demanding 3D games like Bioshock.  


You'll get a set of four USB 3.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet connection, mini-DisplayPort and HDMI output.  Combined with the projector, you can use any TWO displays at one time: projector plus HDMI, HDMI plus mDP, etc.  

The mini-HDMI input is pretty interesting and allows you to use the BRIX Projector as a stand alone projector, hooking up a DVD player, game console or anything to be displayed.  The power button on the projector is separate from the PC power and you can run each without the other.


The unit comes as a barebones design, meaning you'll have to add mSATA storage and DDR3 low power SO-DIMMs to get up and running.  Once you have your OS installed, you are going to be met with a rather small 854x480 resolution projector powered by a 75 lumen output.  It's good, but not great.  

That low resolution causes some issues with browsing the web and using some applications like Steam because we have all moved past the likes of 800x600 - thank goodness.  Windows works fine and even Big Picture mode in Steam is an easy fix.

You can see in the video review below that image quality was pretty good for such a small device but the noise levels of the fan cooling the projector are quite high.  I was even thinking of ripping it open and trying more creative ways of cooling the display components until Gigabyte informed me they need it back in a...functional capacity.  Oh well.

The Gigabyte BRIX Projector BXPi3-4010 is selling for about $550 on both and which does NOT include the memory or storage you'll need (WiFi is included though).  That seems kind of steep but considering other pico or mini projectors can easily cost $250-350, this BRIX unit is a better deal that the price might first indicate.

CES 2014: ASUS S1 Mobile LED Projector & SBW-S1

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Mobile, Shows and Expos | January 6, 2014 - 04:00 PM |
Tagged: projector, DLP, CES 2014, CES, asus

And now, for a much different display.

This one has nothing to do with 4K or G-Sync. This is a relatively tiny DLP projector with a built-in rechargeable battery. It is designed to be portable and even connect to MHL-compliant tablets and smartphones. The enclosed battery is expected to last three hours on a single charge or, if using the phone has more need for power than the projector, it can charge your mobile device from its battery.

ASUS_S1 Mobile LED Projector_Top And Side View With Close Cap.jpg

The projector is capable of producing a 41-inch image with only 3 feet of throw distance. It also has an integrated speaker. The SBW-S1 Blu-Ray drive is a companion product to playback high-definition optical disks with the projector (and maybe other devices?). It includes a Xonar sound card and headphone amplifier although I am not sure the use case for a playing Blu-Rays on a 41-inch projector wearing headphones.

The S1 Projector has an MSRP of $319. No availability information yet. Also, no pricing or availability on the Blu-ray drive, either.

Coverage of CES 2014 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2014 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at!

Source: ASUS

Velocity Micro Announces Products To Be Shown At CES

Subject: General Tech, Storage, Mobile | January 5, 2012 - 08:18 PM |
Tagged: CES, velocity micro, usb, storage, projector, peripheral, CES 2012

Velocity Micro, a boutique PC builder just couldn't wait until CES 2012 to show off some of their new products it seems, as a recent web page with some punchy font seeks to get consumers excited about their new tablets, projector, and USB optical/external hard drive combination.


First off, Velocity Micro plans to debut two Android tablets dubbed the Cruz Tablet T507 and T510. Both tablets run the Android 4.0 mobile operating system, and are powered by Cortex A8 processors running at 1.2 GHz. Further, the tablets feature ARM Mali GPUs at 400 MHz, 8 GB of internal storage, 512 MB of RAM, HDMI out, a front facing camera, flash support, and access to the Amazon Appstore. The differences between the T507 and T510 tablets lie in the screen size and lack of rear camera on the T510. The T507 tablet has a 7" capacitive touch screen and has an MSRP of $150 (according to Engadget) while the T510 has a 9.7" capacitive touch screen.


Next up is an external USB hard drive that also features an optical drive and USB hub. Dubbed the VMUltra Drive, the all in one external drive has a DVD-R/RW optical drive, 500 GB 2.5" SATA Hard Drive, SD Card Reader, and 3 USB 2.0 Ports. Pretty nifty, and if the price is right I may be interested in this myself for my work laptop that lacks optical drive and is running low on storage space (heh).


Lastly, Velocity Micro is going to debut the Shine Projector. Supporting an "HD" resolution of 1280x768 pixels, the Shine weighs in at 9 ounces. It features a 300 Lumens (160 ANSI Lumens) brightness, 2,000:1 contrast ratio, a one year warranty, and a mini-HDMI input. Also, it's a glossy Ferrari red, sporty.

Stay tuned to PC Perspective for more CES Pre-CES coverage!

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at!

HD Projectors are fun, 3D HD projectors more so

Subject: Displays | December 7, 2011 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: 3d display, projector, 1080p, optima, optima hd33

In the interests of dispensing with the bad news first, buying an Optima HD33 3D projector will set you back $1500 and does not come with glasses.  On the other hand, thanks to the Texas Instruments 1080p DLP chipset you get full HD resolution image of up to 300" (aka 25') at 1800 ANSI Lumens.  It is active 3D so the projector ships with an RF emitter for the necessary 3D glasses, which are battery powered.  Techware Labs found that the batteries would last about 2 hours before they started to show problems, at that point requiring a 30 minute recharge time over a USB cable.  It supports all HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D formats, so you have your choice of 3D glasses to purchase which is good as the projector does not ship with 3D glasses in the box.  Optoma sells the BG-ZD101 DLP Link 3D Glasses separately for about $75 each.


Didn't I see this in a recent game sequel?

"Optoma's HD33 projector which is a full 3D 1080P projector gets reviewed by TechwareLabs. Through a full 90 day review we were very impressed with the Optoma HD33 projector and were very reluctant to ship it back. The Optoma is a very well designed, very bright and sharp projection. The very simple option and use made the setup and usage ever so simple. All you need is a wall big enough to project on and 3D content."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web: