Powerline Networking is maturing and makes going wireless easy

Subject: General Tech | September 28, 2015 - 02:39 PM |
Tagged: TP-LINK TL-PA8010P, powerline networking, powerline ethernet

Ryan tried out Powerline Networking quite a while ago and found that while it worked, there were certain scenarios where it was not quite as good as advertised, though the idea of transmitting network signals without needing additional wiring and terminations was certainly welcome.  The Tech Report have just concluded a test of the TP-LINK TL-PA8010P adapters a newer product for transmitting ethernet over your dwellings powerlines and even added in WiFi to boot.  When a laptop was wired in, without any setup apart from installing the adapters they saw speeds of 120Mbps, however the WiFi router was not quite as amiable to this configuration.  Once the router had been beaten into submission, it was stuck on WDS mode as it had previously been used as an AP, speeds of 75-80 Mbps were available throughout the house.  Seems much easier that setting up wireless APs as well as a nice maturation of powerline ethernet technology.

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"I decided to try a new spin on a disappointing older technology, home power-line networking, as a means of improving coverage in my home Wi-Fi network. Kinda worked out. Here's what happened:"

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CES 2015: TP-LINK AV1200 3-Port Gigabit Powerline Adapter

Subject: General Tech, Networking | January 6, 2015 - 07:30 AM |
Tagged: tp-link, powerline networking, networking, ces 2015, CES

Powerline networks are not the most popular, especially with advancements in wireless technology, but they are still being actively developed. TP-LINK specifically mentions a few use cases: going through cement or certain soundproof walls, going across metal beams and studs, and going further than is practical under FCC broadcast power limits.

Today at CES, TP-LINK has announced the TL-PA8030 AV1200 Gigabit Powerline networking adapter. This product differentiates itself from previous offerings with “HomePlug AV2 MIMO”, which is an acronym that is normally applied to wireless technology with multiple antennas. It is basically the same thing in this case, because the adapter uses all three prongs.

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Basically, how electrical sockets work is that you have two main prongs, one of which has an alternating voltage applied to it that averages out to about ~115V RMS over a cycle (relative to the other prong). When that wire is connected to a second one, at whatever is considered “neutral” voltage, it creates an electrical current with that drop (or rise) in voltage. A third plug, which is held at the ground's voltage, takes away any excess buildup from friction, wires that are shorted to the case, and so forth.

For this product, this means that one connection will be on the same circuit as a high-voltage, 60Hz signal, and the other will be mixed with ground noise. Keep in mind, the alternative to powerline networking is broadcasting on unregulated, wireless spectrum, so humanity is not afraid to send a signal through some nasty noise. Still, it is good to stop and think about what these engineers have been able to accomplish: broadcasting two signals, down two really nasty (and in different ways) circuits, and combine them for increased performance with multiple devices.

This out of the way, the specifications themselves are brief: it is three Gigabit (1.2 Gbps total) network connections that communicate through A/C plugs. It is backwards compatible with older TP-LINK HomePlug AV adapters (AV1000, AV600, AV500, AV200, and of course other AV1200s).

No pricing information, but TP-LINK is targeting Q3 2015 for this AV1200.

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Source: TP-LINK

CES 2015: D-Link Powerline Networking Adapters

Subject: General Tech, Networking | January 5, 2015 - 09:33 PM |
Tagged: D-Link, CES, ces 2015, powerline networking

Yesterday, D-Link announced two new gigabit-class powerline networking adapters. Powerline networking, which sends a signal between A/C outlets, is for users who want high-bandwidth connections in places that WiFi does not reach and running a cable is out of the question. The SKUs are basically identical, except that the DHP-601AV has a maximum rated bandwidth of 1,000 Mbps, while the DHP-701AV can go up to 2,000 Mbps... sort of.

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You see, unless I am completely misreading the specifications, the only way into this device is a single Gigabit Ethernet socket. The technical difference is that the higher-end model can use the ground plug as a network path, presumably balancing between the “two powered” and the “one power, one ground” circuits based on line quality. That is interesting technology that will help in situations where a gigabit link cannot normally be maintained on a two-prong network but, if it is behind a gigabit bottleneck, that is kind-of not right to advertise, isn't it?

Again, I could be wrong, but the specs seem to claim one, single-socket, Gigabit Ethernet plug.

As for pricing and availability, D-Link does not disappoint. The D-Link AV2 PowerLine Starter Kits will be available in Q1 of this year. The DHP-701AV has an MSRP of $129.99 while the DHP-601AV is set at $79.99.

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