Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: HyperX

Macros and RGB for $39

We’ve previously looked at the top of the HyperX mouse line with our Pulsefire Surge RGB review, and the Core model we're checking out today sits at the entry level in the HyperX lineup, though it still offers full customization for buttons and RGB lighting. Is this $39.99 wired gaming mouse a good value? We will try to answer that here.

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First we'll check out the specifications for the full HyperX mouse lineup:

  Pulsefire Core Pulsefire FPS Pulsefire FPS Pro Pulsefire Surge
Shape Symmetrical Ergonomic Ergonomic Symmetrical
Connection Type Wired Wired Wired Wired
Lighting RGB Red RGB RGB - 360
Buttons 7 6 6 6
Switch Reliability 20M Clicks 20M Clicks 20M Clicks 50M Clicks
Optical Sensor Pixart 3327 Pixart 3310 Pixart 3389 Pixart 3389
Max Resolution 6200 DPI 3200 DPI 16000 DPI 16000 DPI
Max Speed 220 IPS 130 IPS 450 IPS 450 IPS
Max Acceleration 30G 30G 50G 50G
Polling Rate 1000 Hz (1 ms) 1000 Hz (1 ms) 1000 Hz (1 ms) 1000 Hz (1 ms)
Cable Type Braided Braided Braided Braided
Weight (without cable) 87g 95g 95g 100g
Product Dimensions
(WxLxH)
64x119x41mm 71x128x42mm 71x128x42mm 63x120x41mm
NGenuity Software Enabled Yes No Yes Yes

Pricing and Availability: $39.99, Amazon.com

As you can see the Pulsefire Core offers a mix of features between the FPS and FPS Pro models, and still provides NGenuity software control. The first technical difference to point out is the optical sensor (Pixart 3327), which at a max of 6200 DPI sits between the FPS and Surge, and also provides a faster 220 IPS speed than the FPS models. Mouse switches are rated for the same 20 million clicks as the FPS as well, though you will need to move up to the Pulsefire Surge to get the Omron brand switches and their 50 million clicks.

Continue reading our review of the HyperX Pulsefire Core gaming mouse.

Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: HyperX

More than RGB

The Pulsefire Surge from HyperX is a wired gaming mouse with solid specs and 360-degree ring of RGB lighting. The heart of the mouse is its optical sensor, which in this case is the Pixart PMW3389; a sensor with a native 16,000 DPI (or CPI) resolution. A pair of Omron switches handle clicking duties for the left/right mouse buttons, and on paper this seems like a pretty good option - with the added flair of RGB effects. So how did it perform? Let's find out!

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First here's a look at the specifications from HyperX:

  • Ergonomic: Symmetrical
  • Sensor: Pixart PMW3389
  • Resolution: Up to 16,000 DPI
  • DPI Presets: 800 / 1600 / 3200 DPI
  • Speed: 450ips
  • Acceleration: 50G
  • Buttons: 6
  • Left / Right buttons switches: Omron
  • Left / Right buttons durability: 50 million clicks
  • Backlight: RGB (16,777,216 colors)
  • Light effects: Per-LED RGB lighting and 4 brightness levels
  • Onboard memory: 3 profiles
  • Connection type: USB 2.0
  • Polling rate: 1000Hz
  • USB data format: 16 bits/axis
  • Dynamic coefficient of friction: 0.13µ
  • Static coefficient of friction: 0.20µ
  • Cable type: Braided
  • Weight (without cable): 100g
  • Weight (with cable): 130g
  • Dimensions:Length: 120.24mm
  • Height: 40.70mm
  • Width: 62.85mm
  • Cable length: 1.8m

Pricing and Availability:

DSC_0352.jpg

Out of the box the Pulsefire Surge looks quite conventional - more like a standard productivity mouse than a gaming product. This is a compact symmetrical design (aside from the two side buttons along the left edge). Without RGB lighting enabled this could pass for any number of inexpensive or OEM mice on a desk - but we will discover that actual use paints a very different picture.

DSC_0353.jpg

Continue reading our review of the HyperX Pulsefire Surge RGB mouse!

HyperX Releases Pulsefire FPS Pro RGB Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | July 30, 2018 - 08:42 PM |
Tagged: wired, RGB, Pulsefire FPS Pro, PMW3389, pixart, Omron, mouse, mice, hyperx, gaming

HyperX today announced a third member of their gaming mouse family with the Pusefire FPS Pro, a wired model featuring the Pixart PMW3389 sensor, Omron switches, and single-zone RGB lighting effects.

HyperX Pulsefire Pro 1.jpg

"The Pulsefire FPS Pro features the Pixart 3389 sensor for accurate tracking and utilizes premium Omron switches with 20M click durability, six programable buttons, and onboard memory to save up to three custom profiles through HyperX NGenuity software. 

Source: HyperX

HyperX Reveals Pulsefire Surge RGB Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | April 10, 2018 - 01:33 PM |
Tagged: hyperx, gaming mouse, optical, pixart, RGB, pulsefire

Kingston’s gaming brand HyperX is now shipping a new Pulsefire Surge RGB gaming mouse which represents both an aesthetic and hardware specification upgrade over the previous generation Pulsefire mouse. The Pulsefire Surge RGB measures 120.24 x 40.7 x 62.8mm and weighs 100g (130g including the cable). It is a symmetrical design clad in all black with six programmable buttons and a RGB LED ring that runs around the sides.

HyperX Pulsefire Surge RGB.jpg

HyperX is using a Pixart 3389 sensor that it rates at up to 16,000 DPI and 50G of acceleration. The mouse further uses Omron switches for the buttons which are rated at 50 million clicks. It connects to the PC with a 1.8-meter (5.9 ft) braided cable over USB 2.0 (1,000 Hz polling rate).

Users can program each of the six the buttons (left, right, click wheel, DPI selector, and two left side buttons) with macros, adjust the five DPI settings that the DPI button will cycle through, adjust sensor performance, and configure the RGB lighting on the LED ring, and HyperX logo) with any of 16.7 million colors and four brightness levels) using their NGenuity software. The Pulsefire Surge RGB has onboard memory that allows up to three of the configured profiles to be saved to the mouse.

The RGB equipped gaming mouse is currently available for $69.99 with a two-year warranty. It weighs a mere 5 grams more than HyperX’s previous gaming mouse but adds a better sensor (Pixart 3310 vs 3389), programmable buttons, and customizable lighting (the Pulsefire FPS was red LED only) so at least on paper it is a decent upgrade. If you don’t need the extra bells and whistles, the older Pulsefire FPS is going for a bit under $25 less now at $45.52 on Amazon. In either case, the pricing doesn’t seem too bad (I remember paying a very pretty penny for my original Razer Mamba... but at least it’s lasted as long as it has! Heh) and hopefully reviews will start popping up soon.

Have you tried gaming with HyperX and NGenuity?

Source: HyperX

HyperX's Pulsefire, KISS in action

Subject: General Tech | April 27, 2017 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: input, hyperx, pulsefire, gaming mouse, pixart, PMW3310

HyperX's Pulsefire is a mouse, plain and simple.  It does not glow, nor can you remove or add peices to it, it is just a large, functional $50 gaming mouse with a Pixart PMW3310 optical sensor. The Tech Report tested it out, contrasting it to the Logitech G302 which the reviewer uses on a regular basis.  Take a look if you are shopping for a mouse, and only a mouse, not programmable macro, weight enhanced and sensor swapping input device of doom.

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"HyperX is making a foray into yet-unexplored gaming peripheral territory today with its Pulsefire gaming mouse, a simple and software-free rodent. We put this mouse to the mat to see whether HyperX's keep-it-simple approach plays well with gaming mice."

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EpicGear's Morpha X gaming mouse, you can swap the sensors and switches as well as the weight

Subject: General Tech | April 10, 2017 - 04:47 PM |
Tagged: epicgear, Morpha X, gaming mouse, input, ADNS-9800, PMW3360, pixart

Modular gaming mice with changeable weights and shells have become common; ones that allow you to switch the sensor on the other hand are rather rare.  EpicGear's Morpha X lets you do exactly that, it comes with two PixArt sensors, a PMW3360 optical sensor and an ADNS-9800 laser sensor.  The Tech Report strongly suggests disconnecting the mouse when swapping sensors to avoid any possibility to need to reset the mouse.  It is not just the sensors you can swap, the mouse ships with several Omron D2F switches of varying colours as well as a tool to help swap them.  The mouse is a little pricey but for those with a strong opinion as to which sensors and swiches are the best, this mouse is worth a look.

mousewhite-2.jpg

"EpicGear's Morpha X gaming mouse offers a wealth of customization options, from its shell to its sensor to its RGB LED accent lighting. We swapped out every component and tested every setting to see whether the Morpha X delivers a spot in the gaming-peripheral hall of fame."

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