Halo: The Master Chief Collection Coming to PC

Subject: General Tech | March 12, 2019 - 05:48 PM |
Tagged: steam, pc gaming, microsoft, halo

At today’s Inside Xbox event, Microsoft announced that Halo: The Master Chief Collection is coming to PC on both Steam and the Microsoft Store. Not all games will launch simultaneously; in fact, no pricing or release dates have been announced. The only thing we have is the release order.

halo-2019-masterchiefcollection.jpg

  1. Halo: Reach
  2. Halo: Combat Evolved (Anniversary)
  3. Halo 2 (Anniversary)
  4. Halo 3: ODST – Campaign Only
  5. Halo 3
  6. Halo 4

This fills in everything between Halo 3 and Halo 4, inclusive, and reads so weird now that I have that typed out in front of me, on the PC platform. Also, Halo 1 and Halo 2 are, as far as I know, essentially dead for multiplayer reasons now that GameSpy and Games for Windows Live have been shut down for a dog’s age. It could be a good nostalgia trip to play those games again.

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And, yes, I owned a copy of Halo 2: Vista. I was intending to create mods for it until I noticed that their tools were so unbelievably broken that their own example map was impossible to make, at least on release although I am pretty sure that it was never fixed. (They removed the ability to make individual assets and they forgot to include jump pads. Granted, jump pads were not a super-critical feature, but it was also the perfect illustration of how little they cared about mod support.)

Venting past grievances aside, Halo has a good game flow with its relatively slow movement and shields. I am actually excited for it again. It might even be my go-to game if they allow mods again, which I strongly doubt.

Uh... WoW... World of Warcraft DirectX 12 on Windows 7

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | March 12, 2019 - 04:53 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, wow, blizzard, microsoft, DirectX 12, dx12

Microsoft has just announced that they ported the DirectX 12 runtime to Windows 7 for World of Warcraft and other, unannounced games. This allows those games to run the new graphics API with its more-efficient framework of queuing work on GPUs, with support from Microsoft. I should note that the benchmarks for DirectX 12 in WoW are hit or miss, so I’m not sure whether it’s better to select DX11 or DX12 for any given PC, but you are free to try.

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This does not port other graphics features, like the updated driver model, which leads to this excerpt from the DirectX blog post:

How are DirectX 12 games different between Windows 10 and Windows 7?
Windows 10 has critical OS improvements which make modern low-level graphics APIs (including DirectX 12) run more efficiently. If you enjoy your favorite games running with DirectX 12 on Windows 7, you should check how those games run even better on Windows 10!

Just make sure you don’t install KB4482887? Trollolololol. Such unfortunate timing.

Of course, Vulkan also exists, and has supported Windows 7 since its creation. Further, both DirectX 12 and Vulkan have forked away from Mantle, which, of course, supported Windows 7. (AMD’s Mantle API pre-dates Windows 10.) The biggest surprise is that Microsoft released such a big API onto Windows 7 even though it is in extended support. I am curious what lead to this exception, such as cyber cafés or other international trends, because I really have no idea.

As for graphics drivers? I am guessing that we will see it pop up in new releases. The latest GeForce release notes claim that DirectX 12 is only available on Windows 10, although undocumented features are not exactly uncommon in the software and hardware industry. Speaking of undocumented features, World of Warcraft 8.1.5 is required for DirectX 12 on Windows 7, although this is not listed anywhere in the release notes on their blog.

Source: Microsoft

Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Published: Initial DXR Support

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 12, 2019 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, ue4, epic games, dxr, DirectX 12, microsoft

The upcoming version of Unreal Engine, 4.22, will include several new features.

The most interesting addition for our audience is probably “Early Access” support for DirectX 12 Raytracing (DXR) on DirectX 12. This includes the low-level framework to cast and evaluate rays in shaders (although they don’t clarify whether that means written shaders, nodes for graph-based shaders, or both) as well as higher-level features that use DXR, such as area lights, soft shadows, and reflections. They have also added a denoiser for shadows, reflections, and ambient occlusion, which will improve image quality with lower sample counts.

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If you remember NVIDIA’s RTX announcement, many of their first-party demos were built using Unreal Engine 4. This includes the Star Wars demo with the two Stormtroopers putting their feet in their mouths on an elevator with their boss. It makes sense that Epic would be relatively far along in RTX support, especially just before GDC.

A few other additions include Visual Studio 2019 support (although Visual Studio 2017 is still the default). The new Unreal Audio Engine is now enabled by default for new projects, which was a complete re-write of the original system that started a few years ago. The old audio system was a bit of a mess, and, worse, varied from platform to platform.

Unreal Engine 4.22 also (experimentally) opts-in to the much longer file and paths names that were introduced with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. The previous limit was 260 characters for a full path, which was defined as MAX_PATH in Win32. I’m not sure what the new limit is, but I think it’s 32,767 characters after expansion. I could be wrong, though.

If you have the Epic Launcher installed, whether it’s for Unreal Engine, Fortnite, something from the Epic Store, Unreal Tournament 4, or whatever, then you can check out Unreal Engine 4.22 for free. (Royalties apply under certain circumstances… but, at that point, you are making money off of it.)

Source: Epic Games

February 12th Update for Battlefield V Adds DLSS

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 12, 2019 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, battlefield V, ea, dice, nvidia, DLSS, dxr

The Battlefield V Tides of War Chapter 2: Lightning Strikes Update #3 patch, beyond sounding like a Final Fantasy title, has quite a few major improvements. The headlining feature is improved RTX support, which we will discuss shortly, but fans of the game may appreciate the other bullet points, too.

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But first, because we are a computer hardware site, the RTX stuff. DLSS, which was recently added to 3DMark and greatly improved the image quality, has been added to Battlefield V. This setting uses machine learning to produce a best guess at antialiasing, versus calculating it with a direct algorithm (such as with TXAA or FXAA). Now that MSAA is somewhat uncommon, because it is incompatible with certain rendering processes, we’re stuck with either antialiasing via post-process or super-sampling. Super-sampling is expensive, so it’s usually either FXAA, which tries to find edges and softens them, or TXAA, which gives neighboring frames different sub-pixel positions and blends them. Both cases have issues. TXAA is considered the “higher end” option, although it gets ugly when objects move, especially quickly and visibly smooth. Because DLSS is basically a shortcut to provide something that looks like super-sampling, it should avoid many of these issues.

DXR raytracing performance was also improved.

Okay, now the tech enthusiasts can stop reading – it’s time for the fans.

Vaultable object detection is said to have a major improvement with this release. DICE acknowledges that Battlefield V movement wasn’t as smooth as it should be. There were a lot of waist-high barriers that players can get stuck behind, which the vaulting system should propel them over. It should be much easier to move around the map after this update, which is good for people like me who like to sneak around and flank.

DICE has also discussed several netcode changes, such as adding more damage updates per packet and fixing some issues where damage should be ignored, or healing should occur but would be ignored, and so forth. Basically, all of the netcode improvements were related to health or damage in some way, which is a good area to focus on.

Also, the Rush game mode, introduced in the Battlefield Bad Company sub-franchise, will return on March 7th "for a limited time"... whatever they mean by that.

The update should be available now.

Source: EA / DICE

NVIDIA Announces PhysX 4.0: Open Source (3-Clause BSD)!

Subject: General Tech | December 3, 2018 - 08:46 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, PhysX, nvidia, physx 4.0, Unity, unreal engine 4

NVIDIA has just announced a new major version to their popular physics middleware: PhysX 4.0. They also announced that it (both 4.0 and 3.4) will be re-licensed as 3-line BSD. In terms of open-source licenses, this is about a permissive as you can get. You are basically free to do whatever you want – commercial, modified, unmodified, whatever – if you follow the guidelines (which are things like “no warranty”, “don’t sue us for liability”, “give us credit by leaving a copy of the license in all binary and source releases”, and “we’re not endorsing your product so don’t pretend that we are”).

For gamers? It will take a little while before this comes around to you. Unity is currently preparing to update to PhysX 3.4 with their upcoming 2018.3 release; that was the first major PhysX update since Unity 5.0 upgraded from PhysX 2.x to PhysX 3.3 back in March 2015. Epic Games seems to be a little quicker to update to a new PhysX version, but there’s nothing announced on their side either as far as I can tell.

On the technical side: this release of PhysX is interesting.

As mentioned, Unity 5.0 was the point when their PhysX implementation jumped from 2.x to 3.3. This was not a clean transition. NVIDIA changed the way that many of their solvers worked, making them much faster but also less stable (as in simulation stability – so, like, oscillating and breaking apart). While this was acceptable (because most simulations are cosmetic and, if it mattered, you had more performance to just increase the physics tick-rate to compensate) it upset developers who relied upon the stability of PhysX 2, forcing them to work around the glitches.

According to NVIDIA’s promotional video, this version is both more stable and faster. This means that it should be less work to setup things like ragdolls and ball-and-chain systems, while also supposedly being faster. In terms of stability, they intentionally showed a simulation of three balls and chains with varying masses. In PhysX 3.x, this tends to be a degenerate case where joints freak out and split (unless you compensate with smaller physics time steps). Even if it’s on-par with PhysX 3.x, this is a huge win for indie game developers.

PhysX 4.0 will be available for developers on December 20th. It’s unclear when any given engine will integrate it, however.

Source: NVIDIA

Final Fantasy XV Gets Reduced Ongoing Support

Subject: General Tech | November 11, 2018 - 11:28 AM |
Tagged: pc gaming, square enix, final fantasy, final fantasy xv

Square Enix has announced that plans to update Final Fantasy XV (15) are much smaller than they used to be. The game was supposed to be receive four DLC episodes, Aranea, Lunafreye, Noctis, and Ardyn, but will now only get Ardyn in March 2019; the other three are canceled for both console and PC.

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Off into the sunset...

The biggest news for PC gamers: no RTX or Vulkan support (outside that benchmark).

There is also a bit of confusing, self-contradictory discussion about the future of the co-op multiplayer expansion, Comrades. As far as I can tell, it will be split into a $10 (free if you own Final Fantasy 15) separate game on the consoles, but it will remain an in-game option on the PC.

The reason for these changes is that the game’s director, Hajime Tabata, has left the company and the studio that he made less than a year before leaving, Luminous Productions, have been reassigned to a new title within Square Enix.

Source: DSOGaming

Unite LA 2018: Unity Presents MegaCity Demo

Subject: General Tech | October 24, 2018 - 08:04 PM |
Tagged: Unity, pc gaming

Near the end of their keynote at the Unite LA conference, Unity showed off “MegaCity”. This scene, created by their internal Demo team, contains about 4.5 million rendered objects and plays at 60 FPS. About 5,000 moving vehicles are present in the environment as well. They also added 100,000 audio sources, because why not. Spoiler: They then pulled out a (high-end) phone and launched it there too.

This demo was designed to show off two things: Prefab Workflows and ECS.

The Prefab Workflows portion showed attendees, who are developers of Unity-based apps and games, how to cleanly maintain large scenes. The prefab editor allows components to be manipulated in isolation. Nesting allows that “isolation” to be tiered into a hierarchy. Variants allows the artist to override parts of prefabs to tweak without starting from scratch. The punchline is that the entire scene was made in about two months with just two artists.

The ECS side, on the other hand, showed that Unity’s new framework will soon make it a serious performance contender. The programming paradigm diverts from object-oriented principles, instead operating on combinations of lists of thin slices of data that, altogether, represent your system. This is good for CPUs because it allows linear memory access and massive parallelism, including vectorization, which keeps your processor at peak efficiency.

Note that, in terms of draw calls, the system does a lot of instancing to submit them to the GPU together, so this post isn't "Unity does millions of draw calls!" because that's not true. It's distinct objects in the scene that are indexed and sent to the driver in groups. That said, it's still a strong point that ECS is fast enough to effectively batch, LOD, and cull millions of objects into something the driver can handle; the GPU driver just got a lot of attention with Mantle, Vulkan, and DirectX 12. (And yes that's important too!)

NVIDIA Releases GeForce 416.16 Graphics Drivers

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 5, 2018 - 08:06 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, pc gaming, graphics drivers

Another major version bump has occurred in NVIDIA’s Game Ready Drivers over the span of around two weeks. Typically, although there has been a couple of exceptions, NVIDIA has branches that contain major new features once every two-or-so major version numbers. They then push maintenance releases along the number line, which are probably cherry-picked into various branches. In this case, the 410-series branch, which was embodied in 411.63 and 411.60, brought in support for the RTX 20-series of cards.

nvidia-rtx-logo.png

This has been superseded by the 415-series branch with 416.16. (Oddly enough, the root branch has an odd version number. This is the first time I remember seeing that, although I have not been paying too much attention.)

What has changed? Even though it is a Game Ready driver, it is not associated with a game launch per se. Instead, it is for Windows 10 version 1809, which includes support for DirectX Raytracing (DXR). It also adds a handful of fixes, such as removing black-square glitches from Quake HD Remix mod and improving the performance of TXAA in Rainbow 6: Siege. So basically, the main advantage of this driver will be for those who are using the RTX 20-series cards when games such as Battlefield V launch, which should have been two weeks from now but has, instead, been pushed back to November 20th. (I don’t know if they said that raytracing would be supported at launch, though.)

As always, feel free to refresh GeForce Experience and update your drivers.

Source: NVIDIA

GOG.com Celebrated 10 Years with a Free Game

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2018 - 04:52 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, GOG

But which one will it be?

So this is an interesting promotion. To honor their ten years of existing, GOG.com is planning to give away a free game. The twist is that the free game will be decided by public vote: Shadow Warrior 2, SUPERHOT, or Firewatch. Whichever one wins will be available to claim on October 4th.

The site also has a video and a brief timeline of their parent company, CD Projekt. The site doesn’t just start in 2008 when GOG launched, either. The timeline goes way back to 1994, when they localized games for companies like Interplay. The rest of the sub-pages are 2008-and-on, though.

Not much else to say. Happy Birthday GOG!

Source: GOG.com

Huge Lay-offs at Telltale Games ("Majority Studio Closure")

Subject: General Tech | September 21, 2018 - 06:17 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, telltale

This afternoon, Telltale Games announced that they have laid off all but 25 employees; those who remain are there to “fulfill the company’s obligations to its board and partners”. Various sites are reporting that this equates to the loss of about 90% of their jobs. That number would be even higher if you compared it from a year ago, however, where they had “between 350 and 400” employees, according to an interview that Eurogamer had with Job Stauffer at Gamescom 2017.

The signs were there; I just wasn’t paying attention.

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The company has not fully outlined what will happen with their various titles yet. Rumors are that The Wolf Among Us: Season Two and their Stranger Things projects have been canceled. Basically, at least if the rumors are correct, the last 25 employees will wrap up The Walking Dead and that will be it. That said, you never know whether some publisher will swoop in and pick up some licenses. It’s a bit harder in Telltale’s case because their content is licensed from existing franchises (apart from Puzzle Agent and a few card games).

I do hope that someone will swoop in and pick up a bunch of employees, however. The industry, as commonly happens when these things occur, has created a venue to connect those who are affected with potential new employers. This time it is a Twitter hashtag, #TelltaleJobs. If you own a game studio, then you probably already know about this, but, just in case you haven’t, it’s a good place to let people know you’re hiring (if you are).