CES 2018: NVIDIA Opens Up GeForce NOW Beta To PC Gamers

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | January 8, 2018 - 11:35 PM |
Tagged: pc game streaming, nvidia, geforce now, game streaming, cloud gaming, CES 2018, CES

NVIDIA is opening up its Geforce NOW cloud gaming service to PC gamers who will join Mac users (who got access last year) in the free beta. The service uses GeForce GTX graphics cards and high-powered servers to store, play, and stream games at high settings and stream the output over the internet back to gamers of any desktop or laptop old or new (so long as you have at least a 25Mbps internet connection and can meet the basic requirements to run the Geforce NOW application of course - see below). Currently, NVIDIA supports over 160 games that can be installed on its virtual GeForce NOW gaming PCs and a select number of optimized titles can even be played at 120 FPS for a smoother gaming experience that is closer to playing locally (allegedly).

GeForce NOW.jpg

GeForce NOW is a bring your own games service in the sense that you install the Geforce NOW app on your local machine and validate the games you have purchased and have the rights to play on Steam and Ubisoft's Uplay PC stores. You are then able to install the games on the cloud-based Geforce NOW machines. The game installations reportedly take around 30 seconds with game patching, configurations, and driver updates being handled by NVIDIA's Geforce NOW platform. Gamers will be glad to know that the infrastructure further supports syncing with the games' respective stores and save games, achievements, and settings are synched allowing potentially seamless transitions between local and remote play sessions. 

You can find a list of currently supported games here, but some highlights include some oldies and newer titles including: Borderlands 2, Bioshock Remastered, various Call of Duty titles, League of Legends, Left 4 Dead 2, Kerbal Space Program, Just Cause 3, StarCraft II, Resident Evil 7, KOTOR, Tomb Raider, Metal Gear Solid, Dirt 4 (just for Josh), Project Cars 2, Fallout 4, XCOM 2 (a personal favorite), PUBG, WoW, Civilization VI, and more.

While many of the titles may need to be tweaked to get the best performance, some games have been certified and optimized by NVIDIA to come pre-configured with the best graphics settings for optimum performance including running them at maximum settings at 1920 x 1080 and 120 Hz.

If you are interested in the cloud-based game streaming service, you can sign up for the GeForce NOW beta here and join the waiting list! According to AnandTech, users will need a Windows 7 (or OS X equivalent) PC with at least a Core i3 clocked at 3.1 GHz with 4GB of RAM and a DirectX 9 GPU (AMD HD 3000 series / NVIDIA 600 Series / Intel HD 2000 series) or better. Beta users are limited to 4 hours per gaming session. There is no word on when the paid Geforce NOW tiers will resume or what the pricing for the rented virtual gaming desktops will be.

I signed up (not sure I'll get in though, maybe they need someone to test with old hardware hah) and am interested to try it as their past streaming attempts (e.g. to the Shield Portable) seemed to work pretty well for what it was (something streamed over the internet).

Hopefully they have managed to make it better and quicker to respond to inputs. Have you managed to get access, and if so what are your thoughts? Is GeForce NOW the way its meant to be played? It would be cool to see them add Space Engineers and Sins of a Solar Empire: Rebellion as while me and my brother have fun playing them, they are quite demanding resource wise especially Space Engineers post planets update!

Also read:

Source: NVIDIA

CES 2018: HP Partners With Parsec for OMEN Game Stream, a Low-Latency Remote Game Streaming Service

Subject: General Tech | January 8, 2018 - 03:01 AM |
Tagged: pc game streaming, parsec, hp omen game stream, hp omen, hp, game streaming, game stream, CES 2018, CES

HP today announced OMEN Game Stream, a remote game streaming service based on Parsec's low latency streaming technology. Similar to services and technologies such as Steam In-Home Streaming and NVIDIA GameStream, OMEN Game Stream lets users render demanding PC games on their home HP OMEN PC while streaming and playing the games on a lower-end device, either from across the house or across the world.

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With OMEN Game Stream, users can play their high end PC games from the living room couch while the gaming PC in the office does the heavy lifting, or play from their low-end work laptop while on a business trip. In addition to the benefit of having games rendered on your presumably higher end gaming PC, the fact that all game rendering and data stays confined to a single machine means that users can pick up and play from anywhere right where they left off without needing to rely on cloud-based save files or configurations.

All remote streaming services offer this convenience and flexibility in exchange for increased latency, but the Parsec propriety streaming technology used by HP claims to offer superior performance to its competitors. We here at PC Perspective tested Parsec's service late last year and, while not perfect, it offered latency and responsiveness that was as good or better than the offerings from Steam or NVIDIA. Competitive gamers in the FPS or fighting categories may still be unsatisfied, but for the majority of gamers (and game genres), Parsec's streaming technology offers a perfectly acceptable experience if you have sufficient bandwidth on both ends of the equation.

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And speaking of bandwidth, HP is advising that users need a minimum of 25Mbps for 1080p60 gameplay and a minimum of 10Mbps for 720p60. It's also advised to use wired network connections on both ends, or 5GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi if a wired option is unavailable. And remember, like all remote game streaming services, these minimum specs for network speed and quality must be met both at home with your HP OMEN gaming PC and on the road at wherever you're planning to stream.

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Thankfully, to help users troubleshoot connectivity and performance issues, HP also offers a Streaming Performance Test feature in the OMEN Game Stream application. This should give users a guide as to whether their current network connections will offer acceptable performance before starting that marathon RPG session.

OMEN Game Stream will be a free service preinstalled on new OMEN gaming PCs starting this spring, and there will be no charge to users for streaming from their own OMEN PC.

Source:

Onlive has been grabbed by Sony and then immediately consigned to the garbage heap

Subject: General Tech | April 6, 2015 - 02:08 PM |
Tagged: cloud gaming, onlive, sony, pc game streaming

Five years ago Onlive launched a beta of their online gaming system, allowing you to play games over the internet, without needing a high end PC.  Ryan got his hands on the beta to try out and while it did work for him, there was high latency effecting his gameplay and when he mentioned that Onlive had a few words with him.  It seems Sony dislikes the service more than anyone as they have just purchased the company and will be shutting it down in a month, without even offering to move the customers to Playstation Now.  This effects not only the gamers but also the graphics manipulation service they offered to companies using the same infrastructure.   It is always hard to be the first to try offering a new service and streaming has become a competitive business with a lot of companies with deep pockets offering similar services.  There is one major up side for Sony, according to The Register Onlive possesses over 1000 patents for cloud gaming, which Sony can now use to further develop their services.

onlive_games_hardware.jpg

"Subscribers to the OnLive cloud gaming service have just 27 days of playing time left before the corporate servers that host their fragging sessions are to be shut down by Sony, which announced that it had acquired the service on Thursday."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

GDC 15: Valve Shows Off $50 Steam Link Game Streaming Box

Subject: General Tech | March 4, 2015 - 04:31 PM |
Tagged: GDC, valve, streaming box, Steam Box, steam, pc game streaming, gaming, gdc 2015

Valve has slowly but surely been working on its living room gaming initiative. Despite the slow progress (read: Valve time), Steam Machines are still a thing and a new bit of hardware called the “Steam Link” will allow you to stream all of your Steam content from your computers and Steam Machines to your TV over a local network. Slated for a November launch, the Steam Link is a $49.99 box that can be paired with a Steam Controller for another $49.99.

Steam Link Angled.jpg

Valve has revealed little about the internals or specific features of the Steam Link. We do know that it can tap into Valve’s Steam In-Home Streaming technology to stream your PC games to your TV and output it at 1080p 60Hz (no word on specific latency numbers but the wired connection is promising). The box is tiny, looking to be less than half of a NUC (and much shorter) with sharp angles and one rounded corner hosting the Steam logo. Two USB ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, a HDMI output, and an AC power jack sit on the rear of the device with a third USB port located on the left side of the Steam Link.

Steam Link Budget Streaming Box.jpg

In all, the Steam Link looks like a promising device so long as Valve can get it out the door in time, especially with so many competing streaming technologies hitting the market. I’m looking forward to more details and getting my hands one later this year.

NZXT Enters the Set-Top Box Market with the DOKO Remote PC Streaming Device

Subject: General Tech | January 13, 2015 - 03:52 PM |
Tagged: set-top box, remote access, pc game streaming, nzxt, DOKO

The new DOKO device from NZXT is an interesting spin on the living room streaming box, and it's a lot more than another Netflix player.

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So what exactly is it? According to NZXT "DOKO is a low latency (50-80ms), 1080p 30 FPS PC streaming device that brings you the full functionality of your PC, anywhere in your home."

The DOKO provides the interface to remotely connect to computers over your network, providing access to whatever resources you have on your PC. The DOKO has USB ports to connect peripherals and though there is no proprietary hardware required, the company has compiled a “recommend” list of compatible keyboards, mice, and game controllers on their site.

DOKO_TV.jpg

The DOKO interface

And NZXT is making the gaming aspect of the streamer’s capability a big part of the product, though with a 30 FPS limit it isn't as exciting as it could be.

“DOKO brings you unrestricted, latency-free gaming direct to your TV. Experience a new way to play your favorite PC games, with complete access to ALL of them, whether they are from Steam, Origin, Uplay or any other source.”

In-home streaming is already a part of Steam, but the idea of an agnostic gaming experience without a second computer is attractive if it works as well as advertised. The company also points out the advantage of being able to do everything your PC can do… (Uh, we’re talking about spreadsheets, right?)

The DOKO will be available exclusively from NZXT’s online store (sorry, online "Armory") for $99, and will start shipping January 28.

Source: NZXT

Raptr Update Available (for Both NVIDIA and AMD GPUs)

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | July 28, 2014 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: raptr, pc game streaming

Raptr seems to be gaining in popularity. Total playtime recorded by the online service was up 15% month-over-month, from May to June. The software is made up of a few features that are designed to make the lives of PC gamers easier and better, ranging from optimizing game settings to recording gameplay. If you have used a recent version of GeForce Experience, then you probably have a good idea of what Raptr does.

raptr_game_settings_example_balanced.jpg

Today, Raptr has announced a new, major update. The version's headlining feature is hardware accelerated video recording, and streaming, for both AMD and NVIDIA GPUs. Raptr claims that their method leads to basically no performance lost, regardless of which GPU vendor is used. Up to 20 minutes of previous gameplay can be recorded after it happened and video of unlimited length can be streamed on demand.

Raptr_WOW-Quality-Video.jpg

Notice the recording overlay in the top left.

The other, major feature of this version is enhanced sharing of said videos. They can be uploaded to Raptr.com and shared to Facebook and Twitter, complete with hashtags (#BecauseYolo?)

If interested, check out Raptr at their website.

Source: Raptr

Steam In-Home Streaming Closed Beta First Wave Begins

Subject: General Tech, Networking | January 15, 2014 - 02:27 AM |
Tagged: valve, SteamOS, pc game streaming

In-Home Streaming could be the feature most likely to kick-off SteamOS adoption. This functionality brings existing PCs to televisions without requiring the user to actually bring the box to their living room. Likewise, to justify purchasing a SteamOS behemoth, it seems likely to me that Valve will allow streaming back to Steam client from Steam Machines.

Video Credit: Devin Watson (Youtube)

Obviously the catalog of Windows games is the most obvious usage for In-Home Streaming but, in some years, maintaining just one high-end computer might dominate.

We will soon find out more about how it works. Valve has just allowed the first wave of development partners (and apparently many others) to the In-Home Streaming closed beta. Youtube videos are already beginning to leak out, or not-leak out depending on the NDA if one exists, which show it in action. The video, embedded above, is of a Lenovo T410 with an Intel Core i5 and integrated graphics streaming DayZ over Wireless-G. It looks pretty good at, they claim, without any noticeable lag.

The floodgates are open. Now, we wait with our umbrellas.

Source: Steam

New NVIDIA 326.41 Beta Graphics Drivers Add Shield PC Game Streaming Support

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 2, 2013 - 02:50 AM |
Tagged: graphics drivers, nvidia, shield, pc game streaming, gaming, geforce

NVIDIA recently released a new set of beta GeForce graphics card drivers targetted at the 400, 500, 600, and 700 series GPUs. The new version 326.41 beta drivers feature the same performance tweaks as the previous 326.19 drivers while baking in beta support for PC game streaming to NVIDIA’s Shield gaming portable from a compatible GeForce graphics card (GTX 650 or better). The new beta release is also the suggested version to use for those running the Windows 8.1 Preview.

NVIDIA has included the same performance tweaks as version 326.19. The tweaks offer up to 19% performance increases, depending on the particular GPU setup. For example, users running a GTX 770 will see as much as 15% better performance in Dirt: Showdown and 6% in Tomb Raider. Performance improvements are even higher for GTX 770 SLI setups, with boosts in Dirt: Showdown and F1 2012 of 19% and 11% respectively. NVIDIA has also added SLI profiles for Splinter Cell: Blacklist and Batman: Arkham Origins.

The NVIDIA Shield launched recently and reviews are making the rounds around the Internet. One of the exciting features of the Shield gaming handheld is the ability to stream PC games from a PC with NVIDIA graphics card to the Shield over Wi-Fi.

The 326.41 drivers improve performance across several games on the GTX 770.

The other major changes are improvements to tiled 4K displays, which are displays with 4K resolutions that are essentially made of two separate displays, and the monitor even shows up to the OS as two separate displays despite being in a single physical monitor. Using DisplayPort MST and tiled displays allows monitor manufacturers to deliver 4K displays with higher refresh rates.

Interested GeForce users can grab the latest beta drivers from the NVIDIA website or via the links below:

Source: Tech Spot