More GTX 1070 Ti overclocking

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 7, 2017 - 03:21 PM |
Tagged: pascal, nvidia, gtx 1070 ti, geforce, msi

NVIDIA chose to limit the release of their GTX 1070 Ti to reference cards, all sporting the same clocks regardless of the model.  That does not mean that the manufacturers skimped on the features which help you overclock successfully.  As a perfect example, the MSI GTX 1070 Ti GAMING TITANIUM was built with Hi-C CAPs, Super Ferrite Chokes, and Japanese Solid Caps and 10-phase PWM.  This resulted in an impressive overclock of 2050MHz on the GPU and a memory frequency of 9GHz once [H]ard|OCP boosted the power delivered to the card.  That boost is enough to meet or even exceed the performance of a stock GTX 1080 or Vega 64 in most of the games they tested.

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"NVIDIA is launching the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti today, and we’ve got a custom retail MSI GeForce GTX 1070 Ti GAMING TITANIUM video card to test and overclock, yes overclock, to the max. We’ll make comparisons against GTX 1080/1070, AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 and 56 for a complete review."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

You were to bring balance to the price, not leave it in darkness!

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 2, 2017 - 03:03 PM |
Tagged: pascal, nvidia, gtx 1070 ti, geforce

It should come as no surprise to anyone how the GTX 1070 Ti performs, better than a GTX 1070 but not quite as fast as a GTX 1080 ... unless you overclock.  With the push of two buttons Ryan was able to hit 1987 MHz which surpasses your average GTX 1080 by a fair margin.  Hardware Canucks saw 2088MHz when they overclocked as well as memory of  8.9Gbps which pushed the performance past the reference GTX 1080 in many games. Their benchmark suite encompasses a few different games so you should check to see if your favourites are there.

The real hope of this launch was that prices would change, not so much the actual prices you pay but the MSRP of cards both AMD and NVIDIA.  For now that has not happened but perhaps soon it will, though Bitcoin hitting $7000 does not help.

GTX1070TI-5.jpg

"NVIDIA’s launch of their new GTX 1070 Ti is both senseless and completely sensible depending on which way you tend to look at things. The emotional among you are going to wonder why NVIDIA is even bothering to introduce a new product into a lineup that’s more than a year old."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Here comes a new challenger

The release of the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti has been an odd adventure. Launched into a narrow window of a product stack between the GTX 1070 and the GTX 1080, the GTX 1070 Ti is a result of the competition from the AMD RX Vega product line. Sure, NVIDIA might have speced out and prepared an in-between product for some time, but it was the release of competitive high-end graphics cards from AMD (for the first time in forever it seems) that pushed NVIDIA to launch what you see before us today.

With MSRPs of $399 and $499 for the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 respectively, a new product that fits between them performance wise has very little room to stretch its legs. Because of that, there are some interesting peculiarities involved with the release cycle surrounding overclocks, partner cards, and more.

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But before we get into that concoction, let’s first look at the specifications of this new GPU option from NVIDIA as well as the reference Founders Edition and EVGA SC Black Edition cards that made it to our offices!

GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Specifications

We start with our classic table of details.

  RX Vega 64 Liquid RX Vega 64 Air RX Vega 56 Vega Frontier Edition GTX 1080 Ti GTX 1080 GTX 1070 Ti GTX 1070
GPU Cores 4096 4096 3584 4096 3584 2560 2432 1920
Base Clock 1406 MHz 1247 MHz 1156 MHz 1382 MHz 1480 MHz 1607 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz
Boost Clock 1677 MHz 1546 MHz 1471 MHz 1600 MHz 1582 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz 1683 MHz
Texture Units 256 256 256 256 224 160 152 120
ROP Units 64 64 64 64 88 64 64 64
Memory 8GB 8GB 8GB 16GB 11GB 8GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 1890 MHz 1890 MHz 1600 MHz 1890 MHz 11000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz
Memory Interface 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 352-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 256-bit 256-bit
Memory Bandwidth 484 GB/s 484 GB/s 410 GB/s 484 GB/s 484 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s 256 GB/s
TDP 345 watts 295 watts 210 watts 300 watts 250 watts 180 watts 180 watts 150 watts
Peak Compute 13.7 TFLOPS 12.6 TFLOPS 10.5 TFLOPS 13.1 TFLOPS 11.3 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 7.8 TFLOPS 5.7 TFLOPS
MSRP (current) $699 $499 $399 $999 $699 $499 $449 $399

If you have followed the leaks and stories over the last month or so, the information here isn’t going to be a surprise. The CUDA core count of the GTX 1070 Ti is 2432, only one SM unit less than the GTX 1080. Base and boost clock speeds are the same as the GTX 1080. The memory system includes 8GB of GDDR5 running at 8 GHz, matching the performance of the GTX 1070 in this case. The TDP gets a bump up to 180 watts, in line with the GTX 1080 and slightly higher than the GTX 1070.

Continue reading our review of the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti!

NVIDIA Partners with AWS for Volta V100 in the Cloud

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 31, 2017 - 09:58 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, amazon, google, pascal, Volta, gv100, tesla v100

Remember last month? Remember when I said that Google’s introduction of Tesla P100s would be good leverage over Amazon, as the latter is still back in the Kepler days (because Maxwell was 32-bit focused)?

Amazon has leapfrogged them by introducing Volta-based V100 GPUs.

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To compare the two parts, the Tesla P100 has 3584 CUDA cores, yielding just under 10 TFLOPs of single-precision performance. The Tesla V100, with its ridiculous die size, pushes that up over 14 TFLOPs. Same as Pascal, they also support full 1:2:4 FP64:FP32:FP16 performance scaling. It also has access to NVIDIA’s tensor cores, which are specialized for 16-bit, 4x4 multiply-add matrix operations that are apparently common in neural networks, both training and inferencing.

Amazon allows up to eight of them at once (with their P3.16xlarge instances).

So that’s cool. While Google has again been quickly leapfrogged by Amazon, it’s good to see NVIDIA getting wins in multiple cloud providers. This keeps money rolling in that will fund new chip designs for all the other segments.

Source: Amazon

NVIDIA's Quadro vDWS creates Tesla powered servers

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2017 - 12:48 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, pascal, grid, tesla, Quadro vDWS

NVIDIA have updated their GRID virtual PC architecture to allow up to 24 virtual desktops, each with a 1GB desktop, doubling the previous capacity of their virtual machine tool.  Along with this increase comes a new service called Quadro vDWS which allows you to power those virtual desktops with one of their HPC cards like their Pascal-based line of Tesla GPU accelerators.  For workflows which incorporate things such as VR or photorealism this will offer a significant increase in performance; unfortunately Minesweeper will not see any improvements.  NVIDIA accompanied this launch with a new blade server, the Tesla P6 which has 16GB of memory which can be split down to 16 1GB virtual desktops.   Drop by The Inquirer for more information including on where to get this new software.

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"NVIDIA has announced a new software suite which will allow users to virtualise an operating system to turn the company's ridiculously powerful Tesla GPU servers into powerful workstations."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

NVIDIA Partners Launching Mining Focused P106-100 and P104-100 Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 26, 2017 - 11:29 PM |
Tagged: pascal, nvidia, nicehash, mining, gp106-100, gp104-100, cryptocurrency

In addion to the AMD-based mining graphics cards based on the RX 470 Polaris silicon that have appeared online, NVIDIA and its partners are launching cryptocurrency mining cards based on GP106 and GP104 GPUs. Devoid of any GeForce or GTX branding, these cost controlled cards focused on mining lack the usual array of display outputs and have much shorter warranties (rumors point at a 3 month warranty restriction imposed by NVIDIA). So far Asus, Colorful, EVGA, Inno3D, MSI, and Zotac "P106-100" cards based on GP106 (GTX 1060 equivalent) silicon have been spotted online with Manli and Palit reportedly also working on cards. Many of these manufacturers are also also planning "P104-100" cards based on GP104 or the GTX 1070 though much less information is available at the moment. Pricing is still up in the air but pre-orders are starting to pop up overseas so release dates and prices will hopefully become official soon.

ASUS GP106-100 MINER.jpg

These mining oriented cards appear to be equipped with heatsinks similar to their gaming oriented siblings, but have fans rated for 24/7 operation. Further, while the cards can be overclocked they are clocked out of the box at reference clock speeds and allegedly have bolstered power delivery hardware to keep the cards mining smoothly under 24/7 operation. The majority of cards from NVIDIA partners lack any display outputs (the Colorful card has a single DVI out) which helps a bit with ventilation by leaving both slots vented. These cards are intended to be run in headless system or with systems that also have graphics integrated into the CPU (miners not wanting to waste a PCI-E slot!).

  Base Clock Boost Clock Memory (Type) Pricing
ASUS MINING-P106-6G 1506 MHz 1708 MHz 6 GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz $226
Colorful P106-100 WK1/WK2 1506 MHz 1708 MHz 6GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz ?
EVGA GTX1060 6G P106 1506 MHz 1708 MHz 6GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz $284?
Inno3D P106-100 Compact 1506 Mhz 1708 MHz 6GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz ?
Inno3D P106-100 Twin 1506 MHz 1708 MHz 6GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz ?
MSI P106-100 MINER 1506 MHz 1708 MHz 6GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz $224
MSI P104-100 MINER TDB TBD 6GB (GDDR5X) @ ? ?
ZOTAC P106-100 1506 MHz 1708 MHz 6GB (GDDR5) @ 8 GHz ?

Looking at the Nicehash Profitability Calculator, the GTX 1060 and GTX 1070 are rated at 20.13 MH/s and 28.69 MH/s at DaggerHashimoto (Etherium) mining respectively with many users able to get a good bit higher hash rates with a bit of overclocking (and in the case of AMD undervolting to optimize power efficiency). NVIDIA cards tend to be good for other algorithms as well such as ZCash and Libry and Equihash (at least those were the majority of coins my 750 Ti mined likely due to it not having the memory to attempt ETH mining heh). The calculator estimates these GPUs at 0.00098942 BTC per day and 0.00145567 BTC per day respectivey. If difficulty and exchange rate were to remains constant that amounts to an income of $1197.95 per year for a GP106 and $1791.73 per year for a GP104 GPU and ROI in under 3 months. Of course cryptocurrency to USD exchange rates will not remain constant, there are transactions and mining fees, and mining difficulty will rise as more hardware is added to the network as miners so these estimated numbers will be lower in reality. Also, these numbers are before electricity, maintainence time, and failed hardware costs, but currently mining alt coins is still very much profitable using graphics cards.

AMD and NVIDIA (and their AIB partners) are hoping to get in on this action with cards binned and tuned for mining and at their rumored prices placing them cheaper than their gaming focused RX and GTX variants miners are sure to scoop these cards up in huge batches (some of the above cards are only availabe in large orders). Hopefully this will alleviate the strain on the gaming graphics card market and bring prices back down closer to their original MSRPs for gamers!

Also read:

What are your thoughts on all this GPU mining and cryptocurrency / blockchain technology stuff?

Source: Videocardz

EK is releasing new GeForce GTX FE Full-Cover water blocks

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 23, 2017 - 03:58 PM |
Tagged: ek cooling, pascal, nvidia, waterblock, GTX FE

The current series of EK Cooling waterblocks for Pascal based GPUs, up to and including the new Titan X are being replaced with a new family of coolers.  The new GTX FE water blocks will be compatible with the previous generation of backplates, so you can do a partial upgrade or keep an eye out for discounts on the previous generation.

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These new coolers will fit on any Founders Edition reference card, from GTX 1060's through to the Titan X, currently that count stands at 106 unique graphics cards so your card is likely to be compatible.  You can choose between four models, a plain design, one with acetal, one with nickel and one with both acetal and nickel, whichever one you choose it will still run you 109.95€/$125USD

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Full PR is below.

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia-based premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is releasing several new EK-FC GeForce GTX FE water blocks that are compatible with multiple reference design Founders Edition NVIDIA® GeForce GTX 1060, 1070, 1080, 1080 Ti, Titan X Pascal and Titan Xp based graphics cards. All the water blocks feature recently introduced aesthetic terminal cover as well! FE blocks come as a replacement to current GeForce GTX 10x0 / TITAN X Series of water blocks.

All current GeForce GTX 10x0 / TITAN X Series of water blocks are going to be discontinued after the stock runs out and FE blocks come as a complete replacement. FE blocks are designed to fit all reference design Founders Edition NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060, 1070, 1080, 1080 Ti, Titan X Pascal and Titan Xp based graphics cards. The current compatibility list rounds up a total of 106 graphics cards that are on the market, but as always, we recommend that you refer to the EK Cooling Configurator for a precise compatibility match.

The new EK-FC GeForce GTX FE water blocks are also backward compatible with all EK-FC1080 GTX Backplates, EK-FC1080 GTX Ti Backplates, and EK-FC Titan X Pascal Backplates.

Availability and pricing
These water blocks are made in Slovenia, Europe and are available for purchase through EK Webshop and Partner Reseller Network. In the table below you can see manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) with VAT included.

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Inno3D Introduces a Single Slot GTX 1050 Ti Graphics Card

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 13, 2017 - 11:46 PM |
Tagged: SFF, pascal, nvidia, Inno3D, GP107

Hong Kong based Inno3D recently introduced a single slot graphics card using NVIDIA’s mid-range GTX 1050 Ti GPU. The aptly named Inno3D GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (1-Slot Edition) combines the reference clocked Pascal GPU, 4GB of GDDR5 memory, and a shrouded single fan cooler clad in red and black.

Inno3D GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 1 Slot Edition.png

Around back, the card offers three display outputs including a HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.4, and DVI-D. The single slot cooler is a bit of an odd design with an thin axial fan rather than a centrifugal type that sits over a fake plastic fin array. Note that these fins do not actually cool anything, in fact the PCB of the card does not even extend out to where the fan is; presumably the fins are there primarily for aesthetics and secondarily to channel a bit of the air the fan pulls down. Air is pulled in and pushed over the actual GPU heatsink (under the shroud) and out the vent holes next to the display connectors. Air is circulated through the case and is not actually exhausted like traditional dual slot (and some single slot) designs. I am curious how the choice of fan and vents will affect cooling performance.

Overclocking is going to be limited on this card, and it comes out-of-the-box clocked at NVIDIA reference speeds of 1290 MHz base and 1392 MHz boost for the GPU’s 768 cores and 7 GT/s for the 4GB of GDDR5 memory. The card measures 211 mm (~8.3”) long and should fit in just about any case. Since it pulls all of its power from the slot, it might be a good option for those slim towers OEMs like to use these days to get a bit of gaming out of a retail PC.

Inno3D is not yet talking availability or pricing, but looking at there existing lineup I would expect a MSRP around $150.

Source: Tech Report

Rumor: GeForce GT 1030 Planned, Potentially with GP108

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 22, 2017 - 12:53 AM |
Tagged: pascal, nvidia, gt 1030, gp108

Expreview.com (machine-translated from Chinese) believes that NVIDIA will launch the GeForce GT 1030 to compete in the low-end. It’s difficult to tell how confident they are about this next part, due to the translation, but they believe that it will be based on a new Pascal design, GP108, rather than a further-disabled GP107 (as seen in the GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti). Those parts have 640 and 768 CUDA cores, respectively, which might be where their estimate of 512 CUDA cores for GP108 comes from.

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As for the merits as a product, it seems a little odd to me. There is some room for it in terms of performance, sliding between the GTX 1050 and integrated graphics with a GTX 750-class part, just with higher clocks and/or lower power due to the Pascal architecture. It does seem risky, though, considering the GTX 1050 already occupies the $110 USD price point.

The post also suggests that the cards will have 1 GB and 2 GB variants.

NVIDIA Releases TITAN Xp with Fully-Unlocked GP102

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 6, 2017 - 01:13 PM |
Tagged: titan xp, pascal, nvidia

While I realize that it’s the other way around if anything, part of me wants to believe that NVIDIA released this new graphics card, the TITAN Xp, solely to prevent people from calling last year’s Titan X “Titan XP”. Alternatively, they could be trolling everyone, but doing so with a legit product launch.

nvidia-2017-actualtitanxp.png

The NVIDIA TITAN Xp is, finally, a fully-unlocked GP102 for the consumer market, which was previously exclusive to the Tesla P40 and Quadro P6000 graphics cards. The extra 256 CUDA cores and slight bump in boost clocks equate to an expected 10.7% increase in boost shader capacity (12.15 TFLOPs vs 10.97 TFLOPs). Memory bandwidth, for its 12GB of GDDR5X, has also increase from 480 GB/s to 547.7 GB/s, which is a 14.1% increase.

NVIDIA's blog post also mentions that macOS drivers are coming this month.

The NVIDIA TITAN Xp is available now from NVIDIA’s website for $1200 USD. 2016’s NVIDIA Titan X is also listed at $1200, but is out of stock for some weird reason… hmm. It’s almost like they released an all-around better product at the same price point.

Source: NVIDIA