Lian Li's New PC-T70 Test Bench

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 16, 2017 - 06:05 PM |
Tagged: Test Bench, T70-1, PC-T70, open air case, Lian Li, acrylic

Lian Li has designed an open air case with an optional acrylic enclosure to help simulate normal case environs or to protect your components if you build a system you want to showcase.  The PC-T70 is primarily designed as a test bench so you can set up a E-ATX, ATX, or Micro-ATX/iTX motherboard and easily swap out components while benchmarking hardware or software.  The problem with test benches is one of temperature; most of us set up our systems in enclosed cases and the temperatures experienced will be different than in a case fully exposed to any wafting breeze.  Lian Li has overcome this with their optional T70-1, a set of acrylic side pieces and top with mounts for fans or radiators which allow you to simulate a closed case environment when you are reporting on running temperatures.

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There is another use for this case which might tempt a different set of users.   The case fully exposes your components which makes this a great base to build an impressive mod on, or simply to show off all of those RGB LEDs you paid good money for.  The acrylic case ensures that your system cannot be permanently killed by a passing feline as well as providing mounting points for an impressive watercooling setup.  You can check out the full PR below the specs and video.

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New PC-T70 Test Bench Simulates Any Case Environment Lian Li’s New Modular Bench Transforms for Both Closed-Air and Open-Air Testing

May 16, 2017, Keelung, Taiwan - Lian-Li Industrial Co. Ltd is eager to announce the PC-T70 test bench. After productive collaboration, taking feedback from high-end PC hardware reviewers, Lian Li sought to create a test bench that could both provide unhindered access for enthusiasts who want to rapidly swap hardware, and those who like to use their test benches as a workstation. Lian Li’s latest test bench is its most flexible yet – a sleek, minimal platform for easy hardware swapping, with an optional kit that encloses the bench with radiator mounts and an acrylic cover.

Unobstructed Design for Hardware Swapping
After taking feedback from PC hardware reviewers, Lian Li realized that simplicity was key. The PC-T70 has completely free access, with zero barriers hindering the installation of motherboards and other hardware. Users can even remove the back frame for expansion slots and IO cover if they so choose. Six open pass-throughs are positioned around the motherboard tray to route cables down to the PSU and drive mounts on the floor panel.

Simulate Closed-Air Case Environments for Advanced Testing
With the T70-1 upgrade kit, users can add side panels to the open bench, each mounting two 120mm or 140mm fans or a 240mm or 280mm radiator with removable mesh dust filters. It also includes a back panel, mounting an additional 120mm or 140mm exhaust fan and an acrylic canopy secured by magnetic strips to fully enclose the motherboard compartment, simulating a closed-air environment more representative of regular users – a valuable advantage for hardware reviewers. Every panel is modular and easily taken down, so users can rapidly cycle between closed and open-air setups.

A Bench Built for All Form Factors
The PC-T70 mounts E-ATX, ATX, Micro ATX, and mini ITX motherboards, with eight expansion slots to mount VGA cards as long as 330mm. While enclosed, its CPU cooler clearance is limited to 180mm. The floor panel mounts ATX PSUs as long as 330mm and as many as five 2.5” and one 3.5” drives or one 2.5” and two 3.5” storage drives. Users can also use the floor panel to mount a 360mm radiator, reservoirs, and pumps for custom water cooling loops.

Price and Availability
The PC-T70, including the T70-1 option kit is now available at Newegg for $189.99.
Also available in white.

Source: Lian Li
Author:
Manufacturer: Open Benchtable

Overview

Open-air chassis have always been an odd segment of the PC hardware market. While the ability to quickly swap out components is a major benefit to hardware reviewers like us, overclockers, and other people who are working to quickly validate lots of components, they are the antithesis of what most users are looking for from their computers. 

While we've seen some attempts at bringing the open test bed concepts to a more general audience including the Antec Skeleton and the Thermaltake Core P5 and P3, test bench products are often very low volume and are targeting a specific niche market. Due to the low volume nature, test benches are usually pretty low build quality, expensive, and don't seem to be fully formed concepts.

Today, we are taking a look at a product which aims to change all of this, the Open Benchtable.

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From first glance, you might be hard-pressed to tell that the BC1 is meant to be used with computer hardware. One of the unique design aspects of the BC1 is the ability for it to pack completely flat, in a way that may be familiar to you if you've ever had an experience assembling furniture from Ikea. 

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Everything has a place and there's a place for everything on the BC1. Included hardware such as thumbscrews, brackets, standoffs, and even the feet for the actual testbench slot into the single piece of aluminum and store securely into an 8mm thick package. This, along with the completely toolless design mean that the BC1 can quickly be assembled, used, and torn down.

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Once you start to assemble the BC1, one of the most striking features is the build quality. Where we normally see test benches made from lower quality materials like acrylic or bent sheet metal, the BC1 is made of a single slab of anodized heavy-duty AL5052 aluminum. It's difficult for me to imagine a user managing to break this test bench in any way, aside from potentially chipping anodization, without actively trying to do so.

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The first step to assembling the BC1 is to remove the feet from the middle section of the test bench. Simply remove 4 thumbscrews, and you can remove the feet from the main assembly.

Continue reading our review of the OBT Open Benchtable!

CES 2016: In Win H-Frame Open Air Chassis and PSU

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 8, 2016 - 07:03 PM |
Tagged: PSII, open air case, in win, H-Frame, enclosure, CES 2016, CES, aluminum case

Among the enclosures on display at the In Win booth at CES 2016 was the H-Frame (not to be confused with the H-Tower), a striking, open-air enclosure with tempered glass side panels.

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In Win highlights these features for the enclosure:

  • Stunning lighting effect with light controller
  • Open-air layered aluminium metal plate structure provides excellent thermal performance
  • Supports USB 3.1 TYPE-C Super Speed transfer interface
  • Convenient water cooling pump holder for versatile cooling option
  • Equipped with 2 x 3.5”/2.5” SATA HDD modules and Tool-Free EZ-Swap HDD tray
  • Unique In Win logo thumb screws

Every detail of the industrial design was clearly considered with the design of this H-Frame chassis, which has a very high level of fit and finish throughout. I was able to go hands on with the enclosure, which is very large in person at 23.5 inches high, 22.9 inches deep, and 10.6 inches wide. The tempered glass sides are tinted, which helps to reduce visible cable clutter behind the motherboard tray.

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Besides the glass side panels, the entire construction is aluminum, and inside there is a full tower, standard ATX layout. No so standard is the external chassis design, which is a collection of aluminum plates that leave the outer walls of the case open to the air. This is not ideal for noise or dust of course, but this is the tradeoff with open-air designs which focus on cooling and ease of installation.

An interesting addition to the H-Frame announcement is a matching power supply from In Win, which is specifically designed for this limited edition enclosure. The matching SII-1065W is a very large, fully modular PSU that exceeds the width of standard ATX designs, classified as a PSII size PSU. Offering 1065 watts of power, this PSU has an efficiency equivalent to 80 Plus Platinum according to In Win.

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Style matters, of course, so the PSU is color matched and includes internal lighting to match the H-Frame, visible through the clear PSU side panel which is designed to face the windowed side of the enclosure.

H-Frame specifications from In Win:

  • Case size: Full Tower
  • Material: Aluminum Metal Structure
  • Motherboard form-factor: E-ATX / ATX / Micro-ATX / Mini- ITX (max 12” x 13”)
  • Expansion slots: PCI-E Slot x8
    • Supports High-end Graphic Card up to 440mm (Without HDD Tray)
  • Drive bays (internal): 3.5” / 2.5” x6
    • (Supports SATA HDD EZ-Swap Module x 2)
  • Thermal solution support:
    • 120mm Top Fan x3
    • 120mm Rear Fan x1
    • 360mm Top Radiator (height up to 40mm)
    • Supports at least 185mm height CPU heatsink
  • Power Supply: Supports ATX12V & EPS12V up to 210mm 
  • Dimensions: 597 x 271 x 582mm (23.5” x 10.6” x 22.9”)

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Pricing and availability were not available for the H-Frame Open-Air Chassis and SII-1065W power supply.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: In Win
Author:
Manufacturer: Puget Systems

Clearly a contender

Open air cases are a pretty niche market. The number of DIY users that are interested or willing to have their components fully exposed need to have some specific goals in mind. You could be a full time overclocker, looking for easy access to the CPU socket for LN2 or to hit that BIOS reset button. You could also be an enthusiast that is always swapping out components so the ability to bypass getting under a desk and removing a door makes things faster. Or you could just be a show off and want to be certain your friends and family see the gear you have purchased to power your PC gaming.

Just don't be someone with curious cats. 

Puget Systems is a high end system builder based in the north west United States and though they don't plan on making a living selling these open air cases, called the Puget Systems EATX V1 Test Bench, they decided if they were making it, they might as well sell it too. Used primarily for the company's own internal testing and evaluation, the open air test bench is an acrylic structure that holds the power supply and storage on a bottom level along with the motherboard and other components up top, totally open to the elements.

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It is expensive though, at $170.

The stand out features include support for a 120mm or even 240mm water cooler mount, triple GPU support and of course, as the name implies, the capability to hold EATX motherboards. Check out the full video review above and if you just want to see some more photos, click the link below!

Continue to see some more photos of the Puget Systems Test Bench EATX Version 1!!

Scythe Unveils ACB-TYPE3 Open-Air Acrylic ATX Chassis

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 31, 2012 - 05:29 AM |
Tagged: scythe, open bench, open air case, atx case, acyrilic case

Scythe, a PC enthusiast hardware company popular for its line of fans and processor heatsinks will soon be launching a new open air case. The ACB-TYPE3 is a clear acrylic case that forgoes side panels for an open bench design.

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The case weighs in at under 6 pounds, the case is constructed of 5mm acrylic and can accommodate ATX, Micro-ATX, and Mini-ITX motherboards. Additionally, it features three 5.25” drive bays, three 3.5” hard drive bays, and two 2.5” drive bays suitable for storing SSDs (solid state drives).
Another cool feature is that the open air case can hold tower coolers up to 190mm, which is not quite big enough for the 100W passive TwinBlock cooler but will be good enough for most any other high-end air cooler.

According to FanlessTech, the Scythe acrylic case will be available for purchase soon, and will cost around $85. It certainly seems like a neat option for benchmarking test beds and enthusiast’s that like to show off their computer hardware (nothing wrong with that!). You can find more photos over at the Fanless Tech website.

Source: Fanless Tech