Das Keyboard Launches Q-Series Cloud Connected RGB Keyboards

Subject: General Tech | September 6, 2018 - 09:31 AM |
Tagged: X50Q, smart keyboard, RGB, q series, Omron, mechanical, keyboard, key switches, iot, das keyboard, connected, cloud, 5Q

Das Keyboard has introduced their Q-series of "smart, cloud-connected keyboards" which use the company's Q-software to bring notifications directly to key backlighting. It's an interesting concept, and the software connects to both IFTTT and Zapier services "to light up the 5Q and X50Q keyboards with notifications - all color-coded and displayed on keys determined by the user", according to Das Keyboard.

The first of the two announced models is the 5Q, shown here with its silicon-padded wrist rest attached:

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"The Das Keyboard 5Q is a cloud-enabled, open API, RGB mechanical keyboard that helps boost productivity through dazzling performance and the industry’s fastest electronics."

What are these fast electronics? Exclusive to the 5Q is 'Real-Time One' (or RTO) which is an analog technology that Das Keyboard states "detects key presses in 0.4 milliseconds and reports it to the computer within 1 millisecond—up to 45 times faster than other keyboards". RGB lighting is onboard, naturally, and here Das Keyboard is offering what they call "RGB+", which is a ultra-bright solution they claim to be "many times" as bright as other keyboards:

"Extra-bright RGB backlighting electronics called Das Keyboard RGB+, along with custom surface-mount LEDs, optimized lens and ultra-clear light guide—making the 5Q keyboard many times brighter than any other RGB keyboard currently on the market."

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These are mechanical keyboards, both of which offer Omron Gamma Zulu switches, as the company describes:

"A modern best-in-class, soft tactile key switch that provides users with faster, effortless typing and gaming sessions. Das Keyboard’s Gamma Zulu switches have a 1.5mm actuation point, a total travel of 3.5mm and can withstand an unsurpassed 100 million actuations..."

Next we have the X50Q:

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The X50Q adds a swappable top plate design (and includes alternate textured WASD keys), but does not have the RTO analog system - and costs $50 less than the 5Q. Pricing for these keyboards is at the high end of the premium keyboard market, with MSRPs of $249 for the 5Q and $199 for the X50Q. Both models are available now.

Full press release after the break.

Source: Das Keyboard
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: HyperX

More than RGB

The Pulsefire Surge from HyperX is a wired gaming mouse with solid specs and 360-degree ring of RGB lighting. The heart of the mouse is its optical sensor, which in this case is the Pixart PMW3389; a sensor with a native 16,000 DPI (or CPI) resolution. A pair of Omron switches handle clicking duties for the left/right mouse buttons, and on paper this seems like a pretty good option - with the added flair of RGB effects. So how did it perform? Let's find out!

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First here's a look at the specifications from HyperX:

  • Ergonomic: Symmetrical
  • Sensor: Pixart PMW3389
  • Resolution: Up to 16,000 DPI
  • DPI Presets: 800 / 1600 / 3200 DPI
  • Speed: 450ips
  • Acceleration: 50G
  • Buttons: 6
  • Left / Right buttons switches: Omron
  • Left / Right buttons durability: 50 million clicks
  • Backlight: RGB (16,777,216 colors)
  • Light effects: Per-LED RGB lighting and 4 brightness levels
  • Onboard memory: 3 profiles
  • Connection type: USB 2.0
  • Polling rate: 1000Hz
  • USB data format: 16 bits/axis
  • Dynamic coefficient of friction: 0.13µ
  • Static coefficient of friction: 0.20µ
  • Cable type: Braided
  • Weight (without cable): 100g
  • Weight (with cable): 130g
  • Dimensions:Length: 120.24mm
  • Height: 40.70mm
  • Width: 62.85mm
  • Cable length: 1.8m

Pricing and Availability:

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Out of the box the Pulsefire Surge looks quite conventional - more like a standard productivity mouse than a gaming product. This is a compact symmetrical design (aside from the two side buttons along the left edge). Without RGB lighting enabled this could pass for any number of inexpensive or OEM mice on a desk - but we will discover that actual use paints a very different picture.

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Continue reading our review of the HyperX Pulsefire Surge RGB mouse!

HyperX Releases Pulsefire FPS Pro RGB Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | July 30, 2018 - 08:42 PM |
Tagged: wired, RGB, Pulsefire FPS Pro, PMW3389, pixart, Omron, mouse, mice, hyperx, gaming

HyperX today announced a third member of their gaming mouse family with the Pusefire FPS Pro, a wired model featuring the Pixart PMW3389 sensor, Omron switches, and single-zone RGB lighting effects.

HyperX Pulsefire Pro 1.jpg

"The Pulsefire FPS Pro features the Pixart 3389 sensor for accurate tracking and utilizes premium Omron switches with 20M click durability, six programable buttons, and onboard memory to save up to three custom profiles through HyperX NGenuity software. 

Source: HyperX

We need a longer name! Creative's Sound BlasterX Vanguard K08 Keyboard

Subject: General Tech | July 7, 2017 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: Sound BlasterX Vanguard K08, Creative, mechanical keyboard, Omron, input

It seems almost a pity that the only noise this Sound BlasterX device can make is the clicking of its Omron switches, but the Aurora Reactive Lighting offers a 16.8 million shades of RGB to provide a light show.  TechPowerUp were disappointed by the immature status of the driver, macro functionality was added long after launch and they saw lag when switching between lighting modes which other keyboards do not display. This is Creative's first go at an RGB mechanical keyboard and there are some good features to it, especially if you are a fan of Omron switches so take a look if you find your interest peaked.

keyboard-11.jpg

"The Sound BlasterX Vanguard K08 is the first keyboard from Creative and features OMRON mechanical switches, full 16.8M RGB backlighting, dedicated media and macro buttons, and a USB pass-through port. The hardware is supported by their Sound Blaster Connect software driver for lighting customization and performance tweaking."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: TechPowerUp

Das Keyboard Gaming Announces X50 Gaming Keyboard

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 24, 2017 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: Omron, das keyboard

According to post-CES coverage from Tom’s Hardware, Das Keyboard is in the process of rebranding their gaming line from “Division Zero” to Das Keyboard Gaming. Das Keyboard is known for their productivity-focused keyboards, including their famous models with unlabeled keycaps. I’m guessing they realized that more gamers know of Das Keyboard than Division Zero, which this news is the first I’ve heard of it, although it’s possible that they changed their branding for a completely different reason.

daskeyboard-2017-x50-tomshardware.png

Image Credit: Tom's Hardware.
(Das Keyboard hasn't updated their website yet...)

They are also announcing a new keyboard, the Das Keyboard X50 Gaming Mechanical Keyboard, which uses switches from Omron. If this company name rings a bell, they are the provider of switches for several of Logitech’s mechanical keyboards as well as mechanical switches for several mice, including a few models from Logitech, Razer, Steelseries, and others. This keyboard’s brand of switches is called “Gamma Zulu” and Das Keyboard claims that they are manufactured on a production line that is entirely separate from Logitech's Romer-G. There will be two models, one with a bump and another with a click, both of which will apparently be called “Gamma Zulu”.

As for the keyboard itself, it has three macro keys up in the top right, by the volume knob. Tom’s Hardware points out how odd these two decisions are, and I agree. Still, it might be very good for a left-handed gamer that still uses the arrow keys, despite pressure from game developers to pretend to be a Tyrannosaurus rex / Thriller zombie with our hands crushed up to the left, right elbow in our chest. (Thankfully, I have a big desk, so I can just slide my keyboard to the right.)

Yes, I used to look kind-of stupid playing Battlefield 2.

Especially when I bunny-hopped.

Yes, I bunny-hopped. Stop complaining and use a shotgun or something.

If you were a fan of the Das Keyboard X40 Gaming, formerly called the Division Zero X40 Pro, then you can still buy another one. Das Keyboard expects to produce both models in parallel, targeting the lower-end gaming market with the lower-numbered version and its Alpha-Zulu switches, its lack of a volume knob, and its left-side macro keys.

Tom’s Hardware claims that the X50 will sell for $180 MSRP when it launches in Q2.

Das Keyboard 5Q Kickstarter Announced

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 30, 2016 - 03:14 PM |
Tagged: das keyboard, mechanical keyboard, Omron, RGB LED

Das Keyboard has just launched a crowd-funding campaign for their new Das Keyboard 5Q. The company is known to make high-end keyboards with a focus on productivity, even to the point of marketing some models with blank keycaps to force users to learn QWERTY. This model is an “extra bright” RGB LED keyboard that uses these lights to deliver data to the user's peripheral vision (because you're not looking at your keyboard while you type, right?)

daskeyboard-2016-5qkickstarter.jpg

Over the last year or so, RGB LED peripherals have become more commonplace. A new RGB LED keyboard from a gaming company will come in at around the $120 - $170 USD price range. Das is known to be on the higher end of the pricing curve, though. The Das Keyboard 5Q is expected to retail for $229 (although backers perks starting at $109 contain the keyboard -- and Das Keyboard is an established company, so it seems likely that these rewards will be fulfilled).

What you're getting for this cost is a high-quality, mechanical keyboard (with Omron switches) that has an open API. Their examples range from slowly alerting you of notifications, which can be expanded with a press of the volume button, to displaying your CPU load. Their pitch is that you cannot dismiss your keyboard and it's always on your desk, so, using color, it can continually notify you how much free time you have until something needs your attention. You'll need to decide for yourself if that seems reasonable and will help you be productive, or if it will just add to your anxiety, preventing you from zoning out into a good chunk of work.

As always, Kickstarters are backing products, not purchasing them, but Das Keyboard expects backers to receive their keyboards by January 2017.

Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: ASUS

Introduction and First Impressions

The ASUS ROG Gladius mouse features sleek styling and customizable lighting effects, but the biggest aspect is the underlying technology. With socketed Omron switches designed to be easily swapped and an adjustable 6400dpi optical sensor this gaming mouse offers a lot on paper. So how does it feel? Let's find out.

gladius_box.jpg

There are a few aspects to the way a mouse feels, including the shape, surface material, and overall weight. Beyond the physical properties there is the speed and accuracy of the sensor (which also affects hand movement) and of course the mouse buttons and scroll wheel. Really, there's a lot going on with a modern gaming mouse - a far cry from the "X-Y position indicator" that the inventors had nicknamed "mouse" in the 1960s.

One of the hallmarks of the ASUS ROG (Republic of Gamers) lineup is the sheer amount of additional features the products tend to have. I use an ROG motherboard in my personal system, and even my micro-ATX board is stuffed with additional functionality (and the box is loaded with accessories). So it came as no surprise to me when I opened the Gladius mouse and began to look it over. Sure, the box contents aren't as numerous as one of the Maximus motherboards, but there's still quite a bit more than I've encountered with a mouse before.

gladius_top.jpg

Continue reading our review of the ASUS ROG Gladius Gaming Mouse!!