Author:
Manufacturer: MSI

Our First Look

Over the years, the general trend for new GPU launches, especially GPUs from new graphics architecture is to launch only with the "reference" graphics card designs, developed by AMD or NVIDIA. While the idea of a "reference" design has changed over the years, with the introduction of NVIDIA's Founders Edition cards, and different special edition designs at launch from AMD like we saw with Vega 56 and Vega 64, generally there aren't any custom designs from partners available at launch.

However with the launch of NVIDIA's Turing architecture, in the form of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti, we've been presented with an embarrassment of riches in the form of plenty of custom cooler and custom PCB designs found from Add-in Board (AIB) Manufacturers.

Today, we're taking a look at our first custom RTX 2080 design, the MSI RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio.

MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio
Base Clock Speed 1515 MHz
Boost Clock Speed 1835 MHz
Memory Clock Speed 7000 MHz GDDR6
Outputs DisplayPort x 3 (v1.4) / HDMI 2.0b x 1 / USB Type-C x1 (VirtualLink)
Dimensions

12.9-in x 5.5-in x 2.1-in (327 x 140 x 55.6 mm)

Weight 3.42 lbs (1553 g)
Price $849.99

Introduced with the GTX 1080 Ti, the Gaming X Trio is as you might expect, a triple fan design, that makes up MSI's highest performance graphics card offering.

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Click here to continue reading our review of the MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X TRio

More RTX facts for your enjoyment

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 21, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2080, nvidia, TU104

The Tech Report takes a look at the less of the two new Turing cards, the RTX 2080.  It has not been as well received as the 2080 Ti as it is very similar in performance to the GTX 1080 Ti.  One possible area which the new card might hold an advantage is in frametimes, with the new card providing smoother performance, as opposed to raw frames per second.  As their review shows, this is true in some cases but not all; see if your preferred games might benefit from the new RTX while we await releases which support the new features present on the RTX series.

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"Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080 brings Turing to a price point that's more accessible than the flagship RTX 2080 Ti. At $800, however, the Founders Edition card we're testing still has to contend with the GTX 1080 Ti in today's games. We see whether the RTX 2080 can establish a foothold as gamers await its future potential."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Podcast #514 - NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti Deep Dive

Subject: General Tech | September 20, 2018 - 12:23 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, rtx, podcast, pascal, nvidia, Intel, i9-9900K, i7-9700K, coffee lake

PC Perspective Podcast #514 - 09/20/18

Join us this week for discussion on both the Turing architecture, NVIDIA RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti product reviews, more 8-core Intel Coffee Lake Rumors and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:38:19

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. Thanks to Casper for supporting our podcast! Save $50 on select mattresses at http://www.casper.com/pcper code pcper
  3. News items of interest:
  4. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:26:40 Jeremy: @#*$ing NewEgg
    2. 1:28:35 Josh: Physical Media 4 Evah
    3. 1:31:20 Allyn: Lego Voltron
  5. Closing/outro

EVGA Launches RTX 20-Series XC Ultra Gaming Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 20, 2018 - 03:21 AM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, nvidia, evga

NVIDIA's Turing-based 2000 series graphics cards are finally official, and partners are unleashing all manner of custom cards based on the new GPU. EVGA is launching the RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 under a new XC Ultra Gaming series that uses a translucent shroud (with a very Gameboy Color nostalgia vibe) that wraps a dual fan ICX2 cooler in customizable white, black, and red trim and a large multi-heatpipe cooler to pair with the Turing GPU and GDDR6 memory.

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EVGA is introducing four XC Ultra Gaming series cards, with two RTX 2080 Tis and two RTX 2080s which differ in price and boost clockspeeds. The graphics cards feature 2.75 slot designs with ICX2 coolers and hydro dynamic bearing fans. EVGA claims the cooler is 14% cooler and 19% quieter. The taller card design reportedly allows for a taller fan hub and thicker blades that can push air through the thicker heatsink without extra noise (whereas its 2-slot cards use a smaller fan hub with more blades to try to balance things). Display outputs include three DisplayPort, one HDMI, and one USB-C VirtualLink.

The EVGA RTX 2080 Ti XC Ultra Gaming comes in two models: the 11G-P4-2383-KR and 11G-P4-2382-KR. Memory clocks on the 11GB of GDDR6 memory is clocked at 14000 MHz on both models, but the $1,199.99 11G-P4-2382-KR features a 1635 MHz boost clock for its 4352 CUDA cores while the $1,249.99 11G-P4-2383-KR takes things up a notch to a 1650 MHz boost clock. Of course, enthusiasts can use EVGA's Precision X1 or NVIDIA's new OC Scanner software to overclock on their own. The RTX 2080 Ti graphics cards have 2 8-pin power connectors.

EVGA RTX 2080 Ti XC Ultra Gaming Backplate.jpg

As far as the RTX 2080 XC Ultra Gaming cards, the $799.99 08G-P4-2182-KR and the $849.99 08G-P4-2183-KR pair a TU104 GPU with 2944 CUDA cores with 8GB of GDDR6 memory clocked at 14000 MHz. The cheaper model features a 1815 MHz boost clock while the higher priced model clocks in at 1850 MHz. EVGA's RTX 2080 XC Ultra Gaming cards use a 6+8 pin power connectors.

EVGA's XC Ultra Gaming cards come with a 3-year warranty and are currently being offered on the company's website. While they were previously available for pre-order, at the time of writing the cards are listed as auto-notify presumably due to the launch window slipping back a week.

What are your thoughts on EVGA's take on Turing?

Related:

Source: EVGA

Goodbye NDA, hello RTXs!

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 19, 2018 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: turing, tu102, RTX 2080 Ti, rtx, ray tracing, nvidia, gtx, geforce, founders edition, DLSS

Today is the day the curtain is pulled back and the performance of NVIDIA's Turing based consumer cards is revealed.  If there was a benchmark, resolution or game that was somehow missed in our review then you will find it below, but make sure to peek in at the last page for a list of the games which will support Ray Tracing, DLSS or both! 

The Tech Report found that the RTX 2080 Ti is an amazing card to use if you are playing Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice as it clearly outperforms cards from previous generations as well as the base RTX 2080.  In many cases the RTX 2080 matches the GTX 1080 Ti, though with the extra features it is an attractive card for those with GPUs several generations old.  There is one small problem for those looking to adopt one of these cards, we have not seen prices like these outside of the Titan series before now.

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"Nvidia's Turing architecture is here on board the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, and we put it through its paces for 4K HDR gaming with some of today's most cutting-edge titles. We also explore the possibilities of Nvidia's Deep Learning Super-Sampling tech for the future of 4K gaming. Join us as we put Turing to the test."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

New Generation, New Founders Edition

At this point, it seems that calling NVIDIA's 20-series GPUs highly anticipated would be a bit of an understatement. Between months and months of speculation about what these new GPUs would be called, what architecture they would be based off, and what features they would bring, the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti were officially unveiled in August, alongside the Turing architecture.

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We've already posted our deep dive into the Turing architecture and the TU 102 and TU 104 GPUs powering these new graphics cards, but here's a short take away. Turing provides efficiency improvements in both memory and shader performance, as well as adds additional specialized hardware to accelerate both deep learning (Tensor cores), and enable real-time ray tracing (RT cores).

  RTX 2080 Ti Quadro RTX 6000 GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  Quadro RTX 5000 GTX 1080 TITAN V RX Vega 64 (Air)
GPU TU102 TU102 GP102 TU104 TU104 GP104 GV100 Vega 64
GPU Cores 4352 4608 3584 2944 3072 2560 5120 4096
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1455 MHz 1408 MHz 1515 MHz 1620 MHz 1607 MHz 1200 MHz 1247 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1770 MHz 1582 MHz 1710 MHz/
1800 MHz (FE)
1820 MHz 1733 MHz 1455 MHz 1546 MHz
Texture Units 272 288 224 184 192 160 320 256
ROP Units 88 96 88 64 64 64 96 64
Tensor Cores 544 576 -- 368 384 -- 640 --
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 8 GRays/s -- -- --
Memory 11GB 24GB 11GB 8GB 16GB 8GB 12GB  8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  10000 MHz 1700 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 384-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 3072-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 672GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 653 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 W/
260 W (FE)
260 W 250 watts 215W
225W (FE)
230 W 180 watts 250W 292
Peak Compute (FP32) 13.4 TFLOPS / 14.2 TFLOP (FE) 16.3 TFLOPS 10.6 TFLOPS 10 TFLOPS / 10.6 TFLOPS (FE) 11.2 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 14.9 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS
Transistor Count 18.6 B 18.6B 12.0 B 13.6 B 13.6 B 7.2 B 21.0 B 12.5 B
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 14nm
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$6,300 $699 $800/
$700
$2,300 $549 $2,999 $499

 

As unusual as it is for them NVIDIA has decided to release both the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti at the same time, as the first products in the Turing family. 

The TU102-based RTX 2080 Ti features 4352 CUDA cores, while the TU104-based RTX 2080 features 2944, less than the GTX 1080 Ti. Also, these new RTX GPUs have moved to GDDR6 from the GDDR5X we found on the GTX 10-series.

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Click here to continue reading our review of the RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti.

Owning the 2080 Ti is still a fantasy but this will not be the final leak of benchmarks

Subject: General Tech | September 18, 2018 - 01:07 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2080 Ti, nvidia, leak, benchmark

A new leak has sprung from the green team, with a 2080 Ti purportedly showing up on some Final Fantasy XV benchmarks.  The cards are in reviewers hands so it is possible someone slipped up on their NDA and these accurately depict performance, though this being the internet it is also likely someone is trolling.  If true, the new card is almost 25% faster than the mighty Titan Xp, at least in a Final Fantasy XV benchmark.   Unfortunately it will also cost more than a Titan Xp when it does finally arrive. 

Drop by The Inquirer for a peek.

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"At least that's according to results that popped up in a leaked database of Final Fantasy XV benchmarks, hat tip to TechRadar, in which the RTX 2080 Ti racked up a score of 5,897 compared to the 4,756 achieved by the Titan Xp."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Availability Slips

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 16, 2018 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, rtx, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080

There are two changes to the launch of NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 20-series of cards. The first change is that the general availability, as in the first possible moment to purchase a GeForce RTX 2080 Ti without a pre-order, has slipped a week, from September 20th to September 27th. The second is that pre-orders of the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti have also slipped. They will ship between September 20th and September 27th, rather than all of them shipping on September 20th.

The GeForce RTX 2080 (without the Ti) will still launch on September 20th.

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This was all announced on the NVIDIA forums. The brief, ~six-sentence post did not clarify whether this applied to the OEMs, such as ASUS, EVGA, MSI, PNY, ZOTAC, and Gigabyte. It’s entirely possible that they are just referring to the Founder’s Edition. NVIDIA also did not mention why the delay occurred. Given the relatively short duration, it could be anything from one of the recent natural disasters to accidentally forgetting to add an automatic stop threshold to the pre-order page. Who knows?

The NVIDIA website has been updated to show “Notify Me” instead of “Pre-Order” for the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, so pre-orders have officially shut down for that product. The regular RTX 2080 is still available for pre-order on NVIDIA’s website, though, so you still have a little time to pre-order those.

You can also, of course, wait for the reviews to make a more informed decision later.

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A Look Back and Forward

Although NVIDIA's new GPU architecture, revealed previously as Turing, has been speculated about for what seems like an eternity at this point, we finally have our first look at exactly what NVIDIA is positioning as the future of gaming.

geforce-rtx-2080.png

Unfortunately, we can't talk about this card just yet, but we can talk about what powers it

First though, let's take a look at the journey to get here over the past 30 months or so.

Unveiled in early 2016, Pascal marked by the launch of the GTX 1070 and 1080 was NVIDIA's long-awaited 16nm successor to Maxwell. Constrained by the oft-delayed 16nm process node, Pascal refined the shader unit design original found in Maxwell, while lowering power consumption and increasing performance.

Next, in May 2017 came Volta, the next (and last) GPU architecture outlined in NVIDIA's public roadmaps since 2013. However, instead of the traditional launch with a new GeForce gaming card, Volta saw a different approach.

Click here to continue reading our analysis of NVIDIA's Turing Graphics Architecture

NVIDIA and Arrow Electronics New Jetson Xavier AI Computer

Subject: General Tech, Systems | September 10, 2018 - 04:59 PM |
Tagged: jetson xavier, nvidia, arrow electronics

Looking to do a little bit of black box programming but need new hardware to do it?  NVIDIA have partnered with Arrow Electronics to produce the newest Jetson system, the Xavier.

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The Xavier supports JetPack and DeepStream SDKs, as well as CUDA, cuDNN, and TensorRT software libraries.  The 512-core Volta GPU with Tensor Cores offer 10 TFLOPS at FP16 and 20 TOPS at INT8, with the two NVDLA engines adding another 5 TOPS each.  It is not just the processing power which has been upgraded, running full out the Xavier is rated at 30W with the option to reduce that maximum to 10W or 15W if efficiency is more important than raw speed.

If you are currently using the Jetson TX2 you have some thinking to do as this units pin-out will not be compatible, however many of the signals are.  The units are in pre-order right now, with the Dev Kit selling for $2500 (USD), $1300 if you are a NVIDIA Developer Program member.

Check out the specs and PR below.

specs.PNG

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Sept. 10, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- NVIDIA and Arrow Electronics, Inc. today announced they are bringing NVIDIA Jetson Xavier, a first-of-its-kind computer designed for AI, robotics and edge computing, to companies worldwide to create next-generation autonomous machines.

The collaboration combines NVIDIA’s world-leading AI capabilities with Arrow’s global roster of industrial customers and its broad support network of engineers and designers. This opens the door to the development and deployment of AI solutions for manufacturing, logistics, smart cities, healthcare and more.

“We are entering a new era of intelligent machines that will supercharge industries from manufacturing to healthcare,” said Deepu Talla, vice president and general manager of Autonomous Machines at NVIDIA. “NVIDIA and Arrow are working together to ensure that the unmatched AI capabilities of the Jetson Xavier platform reach deep into the global marketplace with first-class technical support and design.”

“At Arrow, we focus on connecting our global customers and developers to the right technology to enable transformative digital business,” said Aiden Mitchell, vice president and general manager, IoT Global Solutions at Arrow. “NVIDIA’s AI platform and Jetson Xavier is at that point, and our industrial customers can secure the Xavier developer kit from Arrow.com today.”

Jetson Xavier — available as a developer kit that customers can use to prototype designs — is supported by comprehensive software for building AI applications.

This includes the NVIDIA JetPack and DeepStream SDKs, as well as CUDA, cuDNN and TensorRT™ software libraries. At its heart is the new NVIDIA Xavier processor, which provides more computing capability than a powerful workstation and comes in three energy-efficient operating modes.

“Edge intelligence in modern robotics is a critical component in driving new use cases and increasing adoption. This relationship is primed to showcase the value of robotics in new areas and help drive continued innovation in the space,” said John Santagate, research director of Worldwide Robotics at IDC.

The NVIDIA Jetson Xavier developer kit is now available for purchase through Arrow’s website at https://www.arrow.com/nvidia.

 

Source: NVIDIA