The best of storage; which is just a flash in the pan and which is here for the long term

Subject: Storage | April 9, 2019 - 03:17 PM |
Tagged: NVMe, ssd, hdd, sshd, tape, punchcard, Optane, NAS

TechSpot have taken a look at the current state of the storage market and have chosen what they feel are the best products in six different categories; enthusiast SSDs, mainstream SSDs, HDDs, portable storage, external storage and NAS devices.  Unsurprisingly, Samsung's 970 EVO Plus makes an appearance as does Crucial's MX500, you should check out the rest as well as the reasons they took top spot in their article, with links to their full reviews as well.

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"It's been over a decade but we can finally declare solid state drives are not only mainstream, but they're a commodity. Fast storage will hopefully only get faster but today's best choices are only differentiated by how extreme you want to go and how willing you are to pay for the very best."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

Source: TechSpot
Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Synology

Synology DS1019+ Review

Synology this week is launching the DS1019+, a 5-bay counterpart to last year's 4-bay DS918+. Like most of the company's "Plus" series devices, it is aimed at higher-end home users and small businesses with a price (without drives) of $649.99.

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Synology loaned us a review unit of the DS1019+ prior to launch, and after adding it to our growing shelf of network storage devices, we spent some time seeing how this new model compares to its predecessors and counterparts.

Specifications & Design

The design of the DS1019+ is virtually identical to that of the DS918+, with the same style of drive bays, same case material and color, same basic layout of ports and status lights, and even an almost identical list of technical specs. The biggest difference between the two by far is simply the addition of a fifth drive bay on the DS1019+. So, if you liked the look and feel of the DS918+, you should feel the same way about the DS1019+.

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Following the design trends of other Synology NAS devices in recent years, the DS1019+ is compact considering its capabilities. It measures in at 166mm x 230mm x 223mm (about 6.5 x 9.0 x 8.8 inches) and weighs about 5.6 pounds without drives. Included in the box is the power adapter with region-appropriate power cord, two five-foot Cat5e Ethernet cables, an accessory kit with two keys for the drive bay locks, 20 screws for mounting 2.5-inch drives in the 3.5-inch drive bays, and a quick installation guide.

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Like almost all Synology NAS devices, the DS1019+ ships without drives, so you'll need to add your own mechanical or solid state drives in order to use the device. If want to configure the NAS with a traditional RAID, you'll want to populate the drive bays with drives of the same capacity and ideally from the same vendor. If you need to mix-and-match drive vendors, at least aim to use drives with identical performance specifications. Similar in concept to Drobo, Synology also offers a "Hybrid RAID" (SHR) option that allows users to combine drives of different sizes or later expand the array by replacing smaller drives with larger ones. Depending on drive types and size mismatches, however, there is a performance penalty to going this route compared to a similar RAID configuration utilizing identical disks.

As alluded to, the 1019+ is powered by the same CPU found in the DS918+: the Intel Celeron J3455, a quad-core 10-watt Apollo Lake part. With base and boost clocks of 1.5GHz and 2.3GHz, respectively, the J3455 is more than powerful enough to accommodate the transfer and management of data on the NAS, and it also supports hardware video transcoding, which is a huge advantage for services like Plex.

Continue reading for our complete review of the Synology DS1019+!

10 gigabits and 252 TB, it's a seriously NASty peice of kit from Synology

Subject: Storage | February 5, 2019 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: 10 gigabit, synology, ds 1819+, NAS

Synology's DS 1819+ is quite the piece of NAS hardware, supporting an obnoxious amount of RAID varieties and can be specifically configured for just about any task you might want to assign eight SATA drives to, or 18 if you pick up the expansion kit.  More important are the choices of PCIe NICs you can choose from, including a 10GbE SFP+ on PCIe 2.0 x4, a pair of 10GbE SFP+ or RJ45 on PCIe 3.0 x8 or a single 10GbE RJ45 PCIe 3.0 x4 card.

If you are looking for a NAS that can do just about anything you want, and don't mind paying around $1000 for the device, take a look at Modders Inc for the full story.

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"Just like everyone graduated from IDE drives and AGP cards it is time to change how we use home and small office storage. Gigabit Ethernet is still very popular however, it is time to consider the next Ethernet technology. Yes, I am talking about 10 Gigabit (10GbE) enabled devices."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Modders-Inc
Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Synology

Synology DS1618+ Review

Synology's 2018 product lineup includes a new network-attached storage device that merges a prosumer price point with an enterprise-level (albeit entry-level enterprise) feature set. The Synology DS1618+ is a six-bay NAS sporting a quad-core Intel processor, up to 32GB of DDR4 memory, and, most importantly, a PCIe expansion slot.

It's that last key feature -- a PCIe 3.0 x8 (x4 link) slot -- that really makes the DS1618+ interesting, as it lets users optionally expand the capabilities of the device with add-ons like NVMe flash adapters or 10GbE ports. Synology has long offered PCIe expansion capabilities in their products, but they've generally been limited to the much costlier enterprise models. With the costs of 10-gigabit networking continuing to fall, however, the DS1618+ is perfectly timed to bring ultra-fast networked storage to home power users.

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Synology loaned us a DS1618+ for review, and we've spent the last few weeks testing it with our existing 10GBase-T network.

Read on to find out how this new NAS performs, and take a look at some new software-based features that Synology is bringing to the home.

Friday storage roundup

Subject: Storage | April 20, 2018 - 02:58 PM |
Tagged: round up, ssd, hdd, external drive, NAS

The SSD market is somewhat daunting to a newcomer, not just the various interfaces and technology but also the huge selection of models from the various suppliers.  HDDs and NAS devices are a little less so, but there is still a large variety to choose from. TechSpot offer their advice, with a round up of what they consider the best of the best in six categories of storage devices.  Quickly take a look to see if you agree, as it is all likely to change again very soon.

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"With solid state drives now fully mainstream and hard drives being more affordable than ever, there is a broad a mix of high-performance and high-capacity options to choose from in a range of form factors. Fortunately for you, we have spent dozens of hours testing storage devices, so we have a pretty clear idea about what devices are worth buying."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: TechSpot

Hey you, get off of My Cloud! Western Digital hardwired backdoor is a golden oldie

Subject: General Tech | January 8, 2018 - 12:42 PM |
Tagged: western digital, My Cloud, security, D-Link, DNS-320L, NAS

A few years back the D-Link DNS-320L NAS device made headlines thanks to the discovery of a hardwired user and password present which allowed anyone access to your device.  Western Digital seems to have completely ignored that previous furor as it turns out they reused that same firmware, without the update D-Link provided years back, on a number of My Cloud devices.  As of now, if you are running any of the devices listed by The Register here with a firmware version below 4.x you are exposed.  If you can't find newer firmware, which may well be the case, you can use D-Link's 2.30.174 firmware patch on your My Cloud; as always back up anything you don't want to lose before doing a firmware update.

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"If you have a Western Digital My Cloud network attached storage device, it's time to learn how to update its OS because researcher James Bercegay has discovered a dozen models possess a hard-coded backdoor."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Go big or go home, LaCie's 96TB 12big NAS

Subject: Storage | August 8, 2017 - 05:57 PM |
Tagged: thunderbolt 3, NAS, LaCie, big12, 96TB

The big12 NAS device from LaCie comes in 48TB, 72TB, 96TB and 120TB varieties, all having a dozen 3.5" bays for your drives.  The device stands 447x161x237mm which is somewhat larger than the Ruler drive Intel just announced and is 17.6kg fully loaded.  It will connect via Thunderbolt 3 and supports RAID 0/1/6/10/50/60.  Just because it is loaded with HDDs doesn't mean it is a slowpoke, KitGuru measure speeds of 2287MB/s for RAID 0 and 2231MB/s for RAID 5, impressive by any means.  The price is also impressively high, however the speed and quality of the RAID software installed in the device makes it desirable for those who need a serious storage solution.

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"LaCie’s 12big is the current flagship of the company’s professional range of external drives and if you are in the market for huge amounts of capacity and very, very fast data transfer rates then the 12big might be just the thing you are looking for…..but beware, you will need deep pockets – the 96Tb version we review today costs close to £8,300."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Kitguru

COMPUTEX 2017: QNAP Unveils World's First Ryzen-based NAS

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | May 31, 2017 - 01:46 PM |
Tagged: TS-x77, amd, ryzen, qnap, NAS, computex 2017

QNAP are providing a sneak peak of a new line of NAS devices, powered by AMD's Ryzen processors.  The TS-x77 series will come in 6, 8, and 12-bay models with an AMD Ryzen 7 1700 or Ryzen 5 1600 or 1400 processor with up to 8, 16, 32 or 64GB DDR4 RAM dependant on the model. 

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The devices support RAID 0/1/5/6/10/50/60, RAID 1/5/6/10/50/60 + spare, single and JBOD, which support AES-NI encryption acceleration.  Internally there are quite a lot of opportunities to customize your NAS, on all models you will find a pair of M.2 2242/2260/2280/22110 SATA 6 Gb/s SSD slots for your hot storage and depending on the model you will have a mix of 2.5" and dual 2.5/3.5" drive bays for your SSDs or HDDs. 

That is not the only possibilities for expansion in these NAS devices, all models contain three PCIe 3.0, one 8x slot and two 4x which you can use for a PCIe SSD, 10GbE or 40GbE network cards or perhaps even a GPU for local transcoding.  Externally you have four Gigabit ethernet connectors, two USB 3.1 ports, one Type-C and one Type-A as well as five USB 3.0 ports.

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These will not be available until Q3, so we won't be able to review it for a while but rest assured that we are at least as interesting in seeing the performance of Ryzen in a NAS as you are.

Source: QNAP

Western Digital Launches 10TB Red and Red Pro

Subject: Storage | May 17, 2017 - 09:57 PM |
Tagged: western digital, wdc, WD, Red Pro, red, NAS, helium, HelioSeal, hdd, Hard Drive, 10TB

Western Digital increased the capacity of their Red and Red Pro NAS hard disk lines to 10TB. Acquiring the Helioseal technology via their HGST acquisition, which enables Helium filled hermetically sealed drives of even higher capacities, WD expanded the Red lines to 8TB (our review of those here) using that tech. Helioseal has certainly proven itself, as over 15 million such units have shipped so far.

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We knew it was just a matter of time before we saw a 10TB Red and Red Pro, as it has been some time since the HGST He10 launched, and Western Digital's own 10TB Gold (datacenter) drive has been shipping for a while now.

  • Red 10TB:        $494
  • Red Pro 10TB: $533

MSRP pricing looks a bit high based on the lower cost/GB of the 8TB model, but given some time on the market and volume shipping, these should come down to match parity with the lesser capacities.

Press blast appears after the break.

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Drobo

Introduction and Packaging

Data Robotics shipped their first product 10 years ago. Dubbed the Drobo (short for Data Robot), it was a 4-bay hot-swappable USB 2.0 connected external storage device. At a time where RAID was still a term mostly unknown to typical PC users, the Drobo was already pushing the concept of data redundancy past what those familiar with RAID were used to. BeyondRAID offered a form of redundant data storage that decoupled rigid RAID structures from fixed capacity disk packs. While most RAID volumes were 'dumb', BeyondRAID was aware of what was stored within its partitions, distributing that data in block format across the available disks. This not only significantly speed up rebuilding (only used portions of the disks need be recopied), it allowed for other cool tricks like the ability to mix drive capacities within the same array. Switching between parity levels could also be done on-the-fly and with significantly less effort than traditional RAID migrations.

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While all of the above was great, the original Drobo saw performance hits from its block level management, which was limited by the processing overhead combined with the available processing power for such a device at the time. The first Drobo model was lucky to break 15 MB/s, which could not even fully saturate a USB 2.0 link. After the launch, requests for network attached capability led to the launch of the DroboShare, which could act as a USB to ethernet bridge. It worked but was still limited by the link speed of the connected Drobo. A Drobo FS launched a few years later, but it was not much quicker. Three years after that we got the 5N, which was finally a worthy contender in the space.

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10 years and nearly a dozen models later, we now have the Drobo 5N2, which will replace the aging 5N. The newer model retains the same 5-bay form factor and mSATA bay for optional SSD cache but adds a second bondable Gigabit Ethernet port and upgrades most of the internals. Faster hardware specs and newer more capable firmware enables increased throughput and volume sizes up to 64TB. Since BeyondRAID is thin provisioned, you always make the volume as large as it can be and simply add disk capacity as the amount of stored content grows over time.

Read on for our review of the Drobo 5N2!