Manufacturer: Scythe

A Trio of Air Coolers

Scythe is a major player in the air cooling space with a dizzying array of coolers for virtually any application from the Japanese company. In addition to some of the most compact coolers in the business Scythe also offers some of the highest performing - and most quiet - tower coolers available. Two of the largest coolers in the lineup are the new Mugen 5 Rev. B, and the Grand Kama Cross 3 - the latter of which is one of their most outlandish designs.

DSC_0589.jpg

Rounding out this review we also have a compact tower option from Scythe in the Byakko, which is a 130 mm tall cooler that can fit in a greater variety of enclosures than the Mugen 5 or Grand Kama Cross due to its lower profile. So how did each perform on the cooler test bench? We put these Scythe coolers against the Intel Core i7-7700K to see how potent their cooling abilities are when facing a CPU that gets quite toasty under load. Read on to see how this trio responded to the challenge!

DSC_0690.jpg

Continue reading our roundup of three Scythe CPU air coolers!

Run softly and carry a big Scythe

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 6, 2017 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged: scythe, Mugen 5, air cooler

Scythe's Mugen 5 has a bit of a list to one side, which is designed to give your RAM a little more breathing room and will fit on motherboards with very little clearance between the socket and the DIMMs.  At 890g and 130x110x154.5mm it is not the largest cooler on the market but is big enough to warrant attention when picking out a case to install your system in.  [H]ard|OCP's tests show this cooler to be more focused the audibility of the cooler than topping the cooling charts, heavy overclockers will be better served by a different cooler but those building a quiet system should check out the full review.

149591671380fntpns12_2_6_l.jpg

"The Mugen 5 is one of the larger CPU air coolers you will find on the market, and with that is has an "asymmetric design for maximum memory compatibility," so it does not extend deep into DIMM territory. The polished copper baseplate, as well as the rest of the HSF is nickel plated. Also we have a newly engineered mounting mechanism."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: [H]ard|OCP