NVIDIA GeForce GTX Cards Finally Return to Stock at MSRP

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 9, 2018 - 12:23 PM |
Tagged: video card, pricing, msrp, mining, GTX 1080, gtx 1070, gtx 1060, gtx, graphics, gpu, gaming, crypto

The wait for in-stock NVIDIA graphics cards without inflated price tags seems to be over. Yes, in the wake of months of crypto-fueled disappointment for gamers the much anticipated, long-awaited return of graphics cards at (gasp) MSRP prices is at hand. NVIDIA has now listed most of their GTX lineup as in-stock (with a limit of 2) at normal MSRPs, with the only exception being the GTX 1080 Ti (still out of stock). The lead time from NVIDIA is one week, but worth it for those interested in the lower prices and 'Founders Edition' coolers.

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Many other GTX 10 Series options are to be found online at near-MSRP pricing, though as before many of the aftermarket designs command a premium, with factory overclocks and proprietary cooler designs to help justify the added cost. Even Amazon - previously home to some of the most outrageous price-gouging from third-party sellers in months past - has cards at list pricing, which seems to solidify a return to GPU normalcy.

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The GTX 1080 inches closer to standard pricing once again on Amazon

Some of the current offers include:

MSI Gaming GeForce GTX 1080 ARMOR 8G - $549.99 @ Amazon.com

EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 SC GAMING ACX 3.0 - $469.99 @ Amazon.com

EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 SC GAMING 6GB - $299.99 @ Newegg.com

GTX 1070 cards continue to have the highest premium outside of NVIDIA's store, with the lowest current pricing on Newegg or Amazon at $469.99. Still, the overall return to near-MSRP pricing around the web is good news for gamers who have been forced to play second (or third) fiddle to cryptomining "entrepreneurs" for several months now; a disturbing era in which pre-built gaming systems from Alienware and others actually presented a better value than DIY builds.

Source: NVIDIA

Samsung 970 PRO and 970 EVO Get Purchase Day Price Cuts!

Subject: Storage | May 7, 2018 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, 970, pro, EVO, price cut, msrp

A couple of weeks ago, the Samsung 970 EVO and PRO launched, but they were not available for purchase until today.

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It appears Samsung were paying attention to the many reviews pointing out that the price premium was getting harder to justify in the face of competing drives closing in on performance because along with purchase availability came some nice price cuts:

Old pricing:

  • 970 PRO
    • 512GB - $330 ($0.64/GB)
    • 1TB      - $630 ($0.62/GB)
  • 970 EVO
    • 250GB - $120 ($0.48/GB)
    • 500GB - $230 ($0.46/GB)
    • 1TB      - $450 ($0.45/GB)
    • 2TB      - $850 ($0.43/GB)

New pricing (MSRP):

  • 970 PRO
    • 512GB - $250 ($0.49/GB)
    • 1TB      - $500 ($0.49/GB)
  • 970 EVO
    • 250GB - $110 ($0.44/GB)
    • 500GB - $200 ($0.40/GB) (Amazon)
    • 1TB      - $400 ($0.40/GB) (Amazon)
    • 2TB      - $800 ($0.40/GB)

These are not sale prices - these are the revised suggested retail prices (MSRP) from Samsung! It looks like Newegg and Amazon are now populating their listings with 970 SSDs at the revised pricing.

How sweet it is, to buy new GPUs ... yes it is

Subject: General Tech | April 30, 2018 - 01:49 PM |
Tagged: gpu, cryptocurrency, msrp

It does seem to be that GPU prices have recently begun to trend down, heading towards their MSRP though with a ways to go yet.  There is no definitive reason for such good news, but there are certainly some obvious factors, of which cryptocurrency is the most glaring.  With more mature currencies close to being mined out, and being designed to run better on ASIC's anyways, that part of the crowd is no longer buying GPUs.  The more recent altcoins which were designed for GPUs are having some minor trust issues at the moment, and there are those designing ASICs for those currencies which is also taking the heat off.  

Also consider the maturity of both Vega and Pascal, they have been out long enough for supply to catch up with demand and in theory there are new products coming soon from both vendors which generally means they are looking to get rid of exisiting stock.  Slashdot and other sites offer a variety of theories but no matter how you slice it, this is good news.

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"If you were looking for a new graphics card for your PC over the last year, your search probably ended with you giving up and slinging some cusses at cryptocurrency miners. But now the supply of video cards is on the verge of rebounding, and I don't think you should wait much longer to pull the trigger on a purchase."

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Source: Slashdot