Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: HyperX

More than RGB

The Pulsefire Surge from HyperX is a wired gaming mouse with solid specs and 360-degree ring of RGB lighting. The heart of the mouse is its optical sensor, which in this case is the Pixart PMW3389; a sensor with a native 16,000 DPI (or CPI) resolution. A pair of Omron switches handle clicking duties for the left/right mouse buttons, and on paper this seems like a pretty good option - with the added flair of RGB effects. So how did it perform? Let's find out!

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First here's a look at the specifications from HyperX:

  • Ergonomic: Symmetrical
  • Sensor: Pixart PMW3389
  • Resolution: Up to 16,000 DPI
  • DPI Presets: 800 / 1600 / 3200 DPI
  • Speed: 450ips
  • Acceleration: 50G
  • Buttons: 6
  • Left / Right buttons switches: Omron
  • Left / Right buttons durability: 50 million clicks
  • Backlight: RGB (16,777,216 colors)
  • Light effects: Per-LED RGB lighting and 4 brightness levels
  • Onboard memory: 3 profiles
  • Connection type: USB 2.0
  • Polling rate: 1000Hz
  • USB data format: 16 bits/axis
  • Dynamic coefficient of friction: 0.13µ
  • Static coefficient of friction: 0.20µ
  • Cable type: Braided
  • Weight (without cable): 100g
  • Weight (with cable): 130g
  • Dimensions:Length: 120.24mm
  • Height: 40.70mm
  • Width: 62.85mm
  • Cable length: 1.8m

Pricing and Availability:

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Out of the box the Pulsefire Surge looks quite conventional - more like a standard productivity mouse than a gaming product. This is a compact symmetrical design (aside from the two side buttons along the left edge). Without RGB lighting enabled this could pass for any number of inexpensive or OEM mice on a desk - but we will discover that actual use paints a very different picture.

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Continue reading our review of the HyperX Pulsefire Surge RGB mouse!

HyperX Releases Pulsefire FPS Pro RGB Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | July 30, 2018 - 08:42 PM |
Tagged: wired, RGB, Pulsefire FPS Pro, PMW3389, pixart, Omron, mouse, mice, hyperx, gaming

HyperX today announced a third member of their gaming mouse family with the Pusefire FPS Pro, a wired model featuring the Pixart PMW3389 sensor, Omron switches, and single-zone RGB lighting effects.

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"The Pulsefire FPS Pro features the Pixart 3389 sensor for accurate tracking and utilizes premium Omron switches with 20M click durability, six programable buttons, and onboard memory to save up to three custom profiles through HyperX NGenuity software. 

Source: HyperX
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech

HERO Power

When it comes to gaming mice, Logitech has never been afraid to take risks and innovate. With PixArt, they created one of the most popular optical sensors in the industry with the PMW3366, which is renowned for its excellent tracking. In fact, the sensor is still be adopted by Logitech’s competitors today, often rebranded with custom firmware and fancy in-house names.

Logitech wasn’t content to rest on their laurels and has continued to push boundaries, introducing their new LIGHTSPEED wireless technology and the HERO sensor which is poised to lead the way into the next generation of gaming mice.

Today, we’re looking at the newest and cheapest way to try this new tech for yourself with the Logitech G305 Wireless Gaming Mouse. It promises performance to rival the best wired mice on the market and battery life between 250 hours and nine months, all for $59.99. Is there a catch? Let’s find out in our full review.

Specifications and Design

  • MSRP: $59.99 (Amazon.com)
  • Sensor: HERO
  • Resolution: 100-12,000 DPI
  • Max Acceleration: > 40G
  • Max. Speed: > 400 IPS
  • USB Data Format: 16 bits/axis
  • USB Report Rate: 1000Hz (1ms)
  • Wireless Technology: LIGHTSPEED (Logitech G Custom 2.4GHz)
  • Microprocessor: 32-bit ARM
  • Battery Life:
    • Performance mode: 250 hours (non-stop gaming, single AA battery)
    • Endurance mode: 9 months (standard usage, single AA battery)
  • Durability:
    • Main Buttons: 10-million clicks with precision mechanical button tensioning
    • Feet: > 250-km range
  • Weight: 3.42oz, 99g (with 1AA battery inserted)
  • Warranty: 2-year limited hardware warranty

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As always, we begin with packaging. It’s a simple affair this time around with a small blue box showcasing the body of the mouse as well as the usual feature callouts on the back.

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Continue reading our review of the Logitech G305 Lightspeed wireless gaming mouse!

Computex 2018: ASUS ROG Gaming Peripherals Announced: Gladius II Wireless Mouse, Balteus Qi Pad, Delta Headset

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 4, 2018 - 07:30 AM |
Tagged: ROG, Qi, peripherals, mousepad, mouse, headset, asus

ASUS ROG has also announced a few new peripherals at this year’s Computex: a headset, a mouse, and a mousepad that includes a Qi wireless charger. All of them have RGB lighting. All of them. Even the mousepad.

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Let’s start with the mouse. The ASUS ROG Gladius II Wireless is a wireless mouse that is built around the Pixart 16000 dpi sensor. It apparently uses two separate wireless connections, one RF and one Bluetooth, to optimize between connection speed and connection latency. ASUS claims to have tweaked the sensor to allow 24 hours on a single charge (if the RGB lighting is disabled). Interestingly, they don’t say whether this can be charged with Qi, which would have tied in to their announcement of…

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The ASUS ROG Balteus Qi is a 370mm x 320mm mousepad that includes Qi wireless charging and 15 Aura Sync RGB lighting zones, where each RGB zone can be individually set. Interestingly, they don’t say whether any of their mice can be charged with Qi technology, so either it’s a glaring omission on the press release’s part, or ASUS intends users to place their phone on their mousepad when they go to bed? It seems like charging a wireless mouse with a mousepad would be an interesting use case, and is something I’ve been considering with Logitech’s solution, although it’s hard to get in Canada. Hopefully the mice actually are Qi-compatible and this is the actual use case.

Also, the mousepad contains a USB 2.0 pass-through port, so you can easily plug-in devices on your desk, like a keyboard, without resorting to a USB hub.

Another version, the ROG Balteus, without the “Qi” suffix, will also be available… without the wireless charging system.

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Lastly, the ROG Delta is a USB headset that connects via Type-C. At first that sounds like, “Well, why would they intentionally use the less-common plug when every PC has a Type-A?” The reason is simple: it also works with Android devices. ASUS doesn’t state much about the headset’s specifications, although it has a “quad-DAC array” (digital -> analog converter) with a 127-dB(A) signal to noise ratio.

All of these devices are coming in the second half of the year. None of their pricing details are known.

Source:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Corsair

Center Your Qi

Wireless charging mouse pads. It’s one of the ideas PC enthusiasts have been asking for since wireless chargers started taking over the smartphone scene. Yet, for years, this seemingly simple idea stymied accessory makers. It turns out, wirelessly charging a moving object is harder than it seems. Finally, the industry seems ready to surmount this challenge, each with their own unique twist.

We’ve seen what Logitech has to offer with PowerPlay and Razer with the FireFly HyperFlux. Today, we look at Corsair’s solution with the Dark Core RGB SE Wired/Wireless Qi Charging Mouse and the MM1000 Qi Wireless Charging Mouse Pad. Is it enough to win the market? Let’s take a closer look and find out.

Specifications

Dark Core RGB SE Wired/Wireless Qi Charging Mouse

  • MSRP: $89.99 (Amazon.com)
  • Programmable Buttons: 9
  • DPI: 16,000 DPI
  • Sensor: PMW3367
  • Sensor Type: Optical
  • Mouse Backlighting: 4 Zone RGB
  • On Board Memory: Yes
  • On-board Memory Profiles: 3
  • Mouse button Type: Omron
  • Connectivity: Wireless, Wired
  • Mouse Button Durability: 50M L/R Click
  • Grip Type: Palm
  • Battery Life: Up to 16hrs with standard lighting or 24hrs with backlighting off
  • Battery Type: Rechargeable Lithium-Polymer
  • Cable: 1.8m Braided Fiber
  • CUE Software: Supported in CUE 2.0
  • Report Rate: 1000Hz
  • Battery Life: Up to 16hrs with standard lighting or 24hrs with backlighting off
  • Battery Type: Rechargeable Lithium-Polymer
  • Weight: 128g
  • Mouse Warranty: Two years

MM1000 Qi Wireless Charging Mouse Pad

  • MSRP: $79.99 (Amazon.com)
  • Surface: Micro-textured Hard Surface
  • Charging Capability: Qi, single-zone
  • LED Indicator Light: Two pattern charging status indicator
  • USB Passthrough: Yes, USB 3.0
  • Dimensions: 260mm x 350mm
  • Also includes:
    • Micro-B wireless charging Qi adapter
    • Micro-B To lightning adapter
    • Micro-B to Type-C adapter

Starting with the MM1000...

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Starting off with the MM1000, we find the standard Corsair black and yellow packaging with a nice product shot on the front. It also features the Dark Core RGB SE mouse, which at the moment is the only mouse in Corsair’s catalog compatible with the MM1000’s unique Qi charging capability without using the included adapters.

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Unlike the other charging options on the market, the MM1000 features a single Qi charging zone, which means it’s capable of charging any number of devices, not just your mouse. Simply placing the device over the circular outline allows it to pick up on the charge. Using the Dark Core RGB, getting it into position is easy and not overly picky like some chargers.

Continue reading our review of the Corsair Dark Core RGB SE and MM1000!

Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech

Logitech Powerplay Wireless Charging System

Logitech was the first company to introduce a commercially available wireless mouse, way back in 1991. Since then, the company and its competitors have evolved the concept to the point where most of the technology's downsides have been addressed, even for some of the most demanding users. But despite significant improvements over the past few years, the one advantage that traditional wired mice have continued to hold over their wireless counterparts is power.

Absent technical issues, a wired mouse will always be ready to work when you sit down at your PC. It will never give up and quit on you in the middle of a gaming session or business presentation. Wireless mice, conversely, rely on batteries with limited running time. The batteries in modern wireless mice can last weeks, even months in some cases, but at some point they'll need to be recharged or replaced. Depending on the situation, it might not be a big deal to simply plug in the USB charging cable or swap batteries when your mouse dies, but it's a safe bet that most wireless mouse users have been caught without adequate battery life at a highly inconvenient time at least once.

The obvious solution to this issue is wireless charging. The technology is already commercially available for devices like smartphones and smart watches, and for years we've been promised more ambitious solutions, such as desks that charge all of your devices at once. But there's a difference between the type of wireless charging products that have been on the market for the past few years and the type of product that would be ideal for your mouse. In other words, it's easier to design and implement a small wireless charging system that accommodates a stationary object (your smartphone) than it is to create an adequately sized mousing surface that can charge an often rapidly moving device.

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But that's exactly the challenge that Logitech decided to address, and the result of their efforts is the Powerplay, the world's first consumer-targeted wireless charging system for mice. When paired with compatible Logitech devices, the Powerplay system offers a low latency "Lightspeed" experience for both gaming and everyday productivity, and it's the first step into a world where users may never need to worry about charging their mouse.

Continue reading our review of the Logitech Powerplay Wireless Charging System!

Just Picked Up: Logitech G900 and G810

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 06:39 PM |
Tagged: logitech, mouse, keyboard, g900, g810

I braved the Black Friday lines... at about three in the afternoon, because this guy isn’t going to get trampled for discounts on computer hardware. Luckily, Best Buy still had a single G900 Chaos Spectrum mouse in stock at 50% off, and a few G810 Orion Spectrum keyboards at about 35% off. I was actually looking to pick them up on Boxing Week if they dropped in price, because I surprisingly needed another mechanical keyboard, but this is even better than I expected.

So, I picked up one of each.

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One of the things that attracted me to the G900 was its ambidextrous design with a tilt scroll wheel. It’s surprisingly hard to get a mouse for left-handed users that also has four directions of scrolling. The 2014 left-handed edition of the Razer Naga has a tilt wheel, although its left and right mouse buttons are swapped, so those who are used to right-handed mice will need to wait until Razer Synapse loads and connects to reverse them to left-on-left and right-on-right. What I’m trying to say is that, for the last two years, my old mouse would have left button right-click and right button left-click until my profile abruptly kicked in about 30 seconds after login. I don’t need to deal with that anymore, while still keeping the mouse tilt wheel.

I did notice that Logitech’s G Software refuses to allow binding scroll wheel input to mouse buttons (which I attach to my thumb buttons for comfortable scrolling). Both EVGA and Razer allow this, albeit you need to perform a full click for each notch, short of writing an AutoHotkey macro. It’s not too bad, because you can bind the keyboard’s up and down arrows instead, but scrolling and arrows might not behave the same in all applications, such as with Tweetdeck.

As for the G810, this keyboard feels really nice. The coating of the keycaps are nice and non-stick, the RomerG switches feel pretty good to me, keeping in mind my favorite Cherry MX switch is the MX Brown, and the keyboard’s feet are possible the best I’ve used. There are actually two sets of feet: one set that inclines the keyboard to about 4 degrees, and another that raises it to about 8 degrees. (These values are written on them.) Even better, it’s stable and takes quite a bit of force to slide.

I would prefer it to have a couple of macro keys, even a single row of them, but there’s only so much I can ask for. The media keys are RGB backlit and surprisingly clicky. I’m not sure what type of switch they use, but it feels mechanical... but a very short one like you would see on a mouse, not a keyboard. The G810 also has a volume roller, which I was a huge fan of when I was introduced to it with the first generation of Corsair K60 and K90 mechanical keyboards. (If another brand did it before them, in 2012, then I’m sorry! Corsair was the first that I’ve seen do it!) I should note that the Logitech roller is a bit smoother than the Corsair one, but, again, the K60 and K90 are about four years old at this point.

So yeah, that’s about it.

Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Evoluent

The Handshake Approach

Evoluent is a maker of ergonomic mice and keyboards, and we received one of the company's vertical mice for review. At a glance you can see that it's a very different design than the typical mouse, as it is intended to be used with the arm in a "handshake" position.

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"The patented ergonomic shape supports your hand in an upright neutral posture that eliminates forearm twisting. Many users said the Evoluent VerticalMouse provides superior comfort and even relieved their wrist pain."

The vertical design has been implemented to reduced strain on the arm and wrist, but how much of an adjustment is there in moving to this orientation? How sensitive and accurate is the sensor? Depending on your workload, precision might trump comfort, but if the VerticalMouse can provide both it would be quite an achievement.

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To test it out I resolved to use the VerticalMouse with my PC exclusively for a week. It was a startling change at first, feeling quite foreign in the first minutes. For someone who uses a standard mouse hours a day (sound familiar?) I felt like I wasn't in control as I attempted to move the cursor around, and I wasn't sure how I was going to be able to adjust. But I pushed on, and rapidly began to grow accustomed to the feeling.

Switching to something that promises to ease discomfort doesn't always mean instant gratification, as any seller of orthopedic shoes can tell you. There is going to be a period of adjustment, with the end result outweighing any initial hesitation - when it's effective, of course. I could spoil the review a bit here and tell you if I'm still using the mouse after a week (I am), but I'll fully describe my impressions below.

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Continue reading our review of the Evoluent VerticalMouse C Right wireless mouse!

Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse: Designed With And For Professional eSports Players

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2016 - 03:00 AM |
Tagged: pro, mouse, logitech g, logitech, gaming

Readers of PC Perspective have noticed that in the last couple of years a very familiar name has been asserting itself again in the world of gaming peripherals. Logitech, once the leader and creator of the gaming-specific market with devices like the G15 keyboard, found itself in a rut and was being closed in on by competitors such as Razer, Corsair and SteelSeries. The Logitech G brand was born and a renewed focus on this growing and enthusiastic market took place. We have reviewed several of the company’s new products including the G933/633 gaming headsets, G402 mouse that included an accelerometer and the G29 racing wheel.

Today Logitech is announcing the Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse. As the name would imply, this mouse is targeted at gamers that fancy themselves as professionals, or aspiring to be so. As a result, I imagine that many “normie” PC gamers will find the design, features and pricing to be attractive enough to put next to the keyboard on their desk. This is a wired-only mouse.

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The design of the Pro Gaming Mouse is very similar to that of the Logitech G100s, a long running and very popular mouse with the professional community. It falls a bit on the small side but Logitech claims that the “small and nimble profile allows gamers of many different game types to play as precisely as possible.” It’s incredibly light as well – measuring in at just 83g!

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This mouse has 6 programmable buttons, much less than some of the more extreme “gaming” mice on the market, all of which can be controlled through the Logitech Gaming Software platform. The on-board memory on the Pro allows gamers to configure the mouse on their own system and take those settings with them to competition or friends’ PCs without the need to re-install software.

RGB lights are of course included with the Pro mouse and I like the idea of the wrap around the sides and back of the mouse to add some flair to the design. 

Logitech is using the PMW3366 sensor in the Pro Gaming Mouse, the same used in the G502, G900 and others. Though mouse sensors might be overlooked for their importance in a gaming, the PMW3366 optical sensor is known to deliver accurate translations from 200-12,000 DPI with no acceleration or smoothing integrated that might hinder the input from the gamer.

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The buttons on the Logitech G Pro use a torsion spring system rated at 20 million clicks (!!) which works out to 25 kilometers of button travel for the life of the mouse. The spring system used is designed to minimize effort and distance required for button actuation.

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All aspects of the mouse were built with gamers in mind and with Logitech’s in-house professional gamers at the design table. Everything from the plastic feel, size, weight, etc. The scroll wheel is optimized for gamer’s use, not productivity, while the braided cable prevents snags. And the best part? The Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse is set to have an MSRP of just $69.

The full press release is after the break and we are due to have a Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse in our hands later today. We will follow up with thoughts and impressions soon!

Source: Logitech

Allyn isn't the only one with a Lapdog on his couch

Subject: General Tech | June 20, 2016 - 05:40 PM |
Tagged: RGB, mouse, lapdog, keyboard, gaming control center, couchmaster, Couch, corsair

The Tech Report would like to back Al up in saying that gaming on a TV from the comfort of your couch is not as weird as some would think.  In their case it was Star Wars Battlefront and Civilization V which were tested out, Battlefront as it is a console game often played on a TV and Civ5 as it is not a twitch game and the extra screen real estate is useful.  They also like the device although they might like a smaller version so that keyboards without a numpad did not leave as much room ... perhaps a PocketDog?  Check out their quick review if Al's review almost sold you on the idea.

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"Corsair's Lapdog keyboard tray is built to bridge the gap between the desk and the den by giving gamers a way to put a keyboard and mouse right on their laps. We invited the Lapdog into our living room to see whether it's a good boy."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

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