PC Perspective Podcast #529 - HyperX Cloud MIX, G-SYNC Compatible Monitors

Subject: General Tech | January 17, 2019 - 07:02 AM |
Tagged: video, Threadripper, podcast, Optane, micron, Intel, hyperx, g-sync compatibility, g-sync, freesync, cortana, 3dmark

PC Perspective Podcast #529 - 1/16/2019

This week on the show, we look at a review of a new wireless gaming headset from HyperX, talk about the new G-SYNC Compatibility program for FreeSync monitors, look at ray tracing performance in the new 3DMark Port Royal benchmark, and more!

Subscribe to the PC Perspective Podcast

Check out previous podcast episodes: http://pcper.com/podcast

Show Topics
01:34 - Review: HyperX Cloud MIX
05:19 - News: G-SYNC Compatible Monitor Driver
13:38 - News: Threadripper NUMA Dissociater
15:47 - News: HardOCP Interview with AMD's Scott Herkelman
21:35 - News: Intel-Micron 3D XPoint Split
24:34 - News: Cortana & Windows 10 Search
29:38 - News: 3DMark Port Royal Ray Tracing Benchmark
35:53 - Picks of the Week
46:24 - Outro

Sponsor: This week's episode is brought to you by Casper. Save $50 on select mattresses by visiting http://www.casper.com/pcper and using promo code pcper at checkout.

Picks of the Week
Jim: iPhone XS Max Battery Case
Jeremy: 3D-Printed Resistor Storage
Josh: ASRock X470 Taichi Motherboard
Sebastian: Koss KPH30ik Headphones

Today's Podcast Hosts
Sebastian Peak
Josh Walrath
Jeremy Hellstrom
Jim Tanous

STH Goes Under the Heat Spreader with Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory

Subject: Storage | December 20, 2018 - 10:34 AM |
Tagged: storage, ram, Optane DC Persistent Memory, Optane, micron, memory, Intel, Hynix, flash, ddr4, 3D XPoint

ServeTheHome got up close and personal with Optane DC Persistent Memory in an article posted yesterday, removing the heat spreaders and taking a look at (and several photos of) the components within.

Intel-Optane-v-DDR4-DIMM-Underneath-Controller-Side.jpg

Intel Optane Persistent Memory DDR4 module, front view (via ServeTheHome)

"We are going to take a 128GB Intel Optane Persistent Memory DDR4 module, and open it up. Until now, Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory has mostly been photographed with its big black heat spreader. We ended up with a handful of modules not from Intel, nor a system provider, but a handful to use."

Among their notes we have this interesting find, as SK.Hynix is the provider of the module's DRAM, rather than Micron:

"On the other side of the module from the Optane controller is a DDR4 DRAM module, this one from SK.Hynix. Model number H5AN4G8NAFR-TFC. We are not sure why Intel would not use a Micron module here since Micron has been the manufacturing partner for 3D XPoint thus far."

Intel-Optane-v-DDR4-DIMM-Underneath-Controller-Side-2.jpg

Intel Optane Persistent Memory DDR4 module, rear view (via ServeTheHome)

The full article is available here from STH and includes an embed of this video covering their de-lidding and chip exploration process:

Source: ServeTheHome
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Crucial

Introduction

Once we saw Intel launch QLC flash installed in their recent 660p M.2 part, I had a feeling that Micron would not be far behind, and that feeling has been confirmed with the launch of the Crucial P1 M.2 SSDs:

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Both the 500GB and 1TB models are single sided. The 2TB (not yet released) will likely have packages installed at the rear.

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No surprises with the packaging. Does the job just fine.

specs.png

Specs are also reasonably standard for an NVMe SSD at this point, though we do see a bit more of a falloff at the lower capacities here. This is partially due to the use of QLC flash, even though these specs are likely assuming full use of the available SLC cache. Since QLC allows for higher capacity per die, that translates to fewer dies for a given SSD total capacity, which lowers overall performance even at SLC speeds. This is a common trait/tradeoff for the use of higher capacity dies.

Read on for our review of the Crucial P1!

Even Intel has the occasional Monday

Subject: General Tech | October 22, 2018 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: Intel, micron, imft, 3D XPoint

Micron is planning on buying Intel out of the Intel Micron Flash Technologies group the two companies created back in 2006, along with the three fabs which come with it, for about $1.5 billion.  The writing has been on the wall for a while; to put it nicely, Optane has not sold well.  This also affected Micron's bottom line as they didn't have customers for their own 3D XPoint flash and so by taking over the entire venture they could repurpose the fabs.  According to The Register Micron has not completely given up on the technology and you should see new products launching towards the end of the year. 

Then there are the 10nm rumours, of course.

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"Micron's acquisition of IM Flash demonstrates our strong belief that 3D XPoint technology and other emerging memories will provide a unique differentiator for the company and be an essential solution for new data-hungry applications."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

The whole DRAM market is changing

Subject: General Tech | July 26, 2018 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: SK Hynix, Samsung, micron, DRAM

According to this story out of DigiTimes we may finally be hitting peak DRAM demand and that supplies and prices may start to decline.  This seems somewhat counter intuitive, the drop in sales of smartphones and cryptomining will reduce the demand somewhat but we should expect to see a surge in demand from auto manufacturers as our cars become more and more complex ... and possibly intelligent.  The counterpoint would be the maturation of current process tech and the numerous plants coming online over the next year or so.  Samsung, Micron, SK Hynix, Innotron and even Jin Hua will be facing a lot of changes over the coming months.  Let us hope part of the changes are a downwards trend in price.

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"Samsung Electronics and SK Hynix would be forced to overhaul their current profit-oriented business strategy as both firms believe that the booming memory market, which has continued for 2-3 years, is likely to be over by the end of 2018, according to a Korea-based Digital Times report."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: DigiTimes

Podcast #505 - ASUS G-SYNC HDR, Logitech G305, and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 28, 2018 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: video, thermaltake, qualcomm, podcast, PG27UQ, nvidia, micron, K70, Intel, gddr6, g-sync, Elgato, corsair, asus

PC Perspective Podcast #505 - 06/28/18

Join us this week for discussion on ASUS G-SYNC HDR, Logitech G305, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:26:36

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. Ryan:
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

Micron announces GDDR6 production is in full swing

Subject: General Tech | June 25, 2018 - 01:46 PM |
Tagged: micron, gddr6

Micron have officially announced that several GDDR6 lines are in full production, with several more still sampling.  Currently the memory comes in 8Gb BGA packages but it is possible to increase the size of a single module to 32Gb which could offer a glimpse into the size of future GPUs onboard RAM.  The memory will operate between 1.25-1.35V with transfer speeds currently topping out at 14 Gb/s offering roughly twice the transfer rate of GDDR5 as well as dropping the power required from 1.35-1.5V.  Drop by Micron for a look at their brochure and product catalogue for a more detailed breakdown.

 

Correction - BOISE, Idaho, June 25, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In a release issued under the same headline earlier today by Micron Technology, Inc.(Nasdaq:MU), please note that in the first and second paragraph of the release the correct casing is Gb, not GB as previously stated. 

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"Micron Technology, Inc. (Nasdaq:MU) today announced volume production on its 8GB GDDR6 memory. Built on experience and execution for several generations of GDDR memory, GDDR6 - Micron’s fastest and most powerful graphics memory designed in Micron’s Munich Development Center - is optimized for a variety of applications that require high performance memory, including artificial intelligence (AI), networking, automotive and graphics processing units (GPUs). Additionally, Micron has worked with core ecosystem partners to ramp GDDR6 documentation and interoperability, enabling faster time to market for designs."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Micron

Micron Launches 5210 ION - First QLC NAND Enterprise SATA SSD

Subject: Storage | May 21, 2018 - 04:30 PM |
Tagged: ssd, sata, QLC, nand, micron, enterprise

For those that study how flash memory stores bits, Quad Level Cell technology is a tricky thing to pull off in production. You are taking a single NAND Flash cell and change its stored electron count in such a way that you can later discriminate between SIXTEEN different states.

SLC MLC TLC QLC.png

...we're talking a countable number (dozens to hundreds) of electrons making the difference between a stored 0101 or 0110 in a given cell. Pulling that off in production-capable parts is no small feat, and doing so for enterprise usage first is definitely a bold move. Enter Micron:

5210_SATA_ION_2.5_bottom_transparent_labled_1000x667.png

The 5210 ION line is a SATA product meant for enterprise usages where the workload is primarily reading. This comes in handy for things like real-time data analytics and content delivery systems, where data is infrequently written but needs to be readable at latencies faster than what HDD's can provide.

ION ECO PRO.png

These are 2.5" 7mm SSDs that will be available from 1.92TB to 7.68TB (yes, 2TB is the *smallest* available capacity for these!). The idea is to enable an easy upgrade path for larger data systems that already employ SATA or SAS (SAS systems are typically cross-compatible with SATA). For backplanes that are designed for slimmer 7mm drives, this can make for some extreme densities.

These are currently being sampled to some big data companies and should see more general availability in a few months time. Press blast from Micron appears after the break.

Source: Micron

Podcast #495 - ICY DOCK’s 16 bay enclosure, Intel Rumors, and more!

Subject: General Tech | April 12, 2018 - 10:20 AM |
Tagged: video, Samsung, podcast, Platimax, micron, KL-G, K68, Intel, icy dock, hp, enermax, corsair, cloudflare, chromebook x2, Byte3, Azulle, amd, AlterEgo, 7nm, 3d nand

PC Perspective Podcast #495 - 04/11/18

Join us this week for ICY DOCK’s 16 bay enclosure, Intel Rumors, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Allyn Malventano, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath

Peanut Gallery: Ken Addison, Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:34:25

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. ButcherBox
  3. News items of interest:
    1. 0:35:00 Chris Hook leaves AMD (to where?) and Sasa Marinkovic takes that spot
  4. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:22:50 Ryan: The NVIDIA Ruler
    2. 1:26:50 Allyn: MKVToolNix (also for Windows)
    3. 1:29:35 Jeremy: Humble Strategy Bundle
  5. Closing/outro
Source:

Micron Constructing New Cleanroom For 3D NAND Fabrication R&D In Singapore

Subject: General Tech | April 9, 2018 - 11:20 PM |
Tagged: micron, manufacturing, IMFT NAND, flash memory, fab, cleanroom, 64-Layer, 3d nand

Micron Technologies recently began construction on a multi-billion-dollar cleanroom facility for research and development of its 3D NAND technologies. The new facility is being built adjacent to Micron’s existing NAND fabrication complex at 1 North Coast Drive where Micron invested $4 Billion to expand in 2016. Micron did not disclose its exact investment in the new cleanroom space except to say that it was a multi-billion-dollar project.

IMFT_Micron 3D NAND.png

Micron’s expanded 300mm 3D NAND manufacturing complex is part of its NAND Center of Excellence, and the new facility that is under construction will expand the company’s ability to increase its research and development efforts and allow Micron to push “even more intricate designs” according to Sanjay Mehrotra (Micron President and CEO). for its 3D flash memory. The new facility will be staffed by the new hires which will mainly be engineers and technicians specializing in 3D NAND manufacturing and will include as many as 600 fresh graduates.

Construction of the new manufacturing and cleanroom space is slated for completion in mid-2019 with initial wafer output by the fourth quarter of next year. Unfortunately, this facility is not intended to add additional wafer capacity (at least at this time) so those hoping for increased supply of NAND chips and cheaper SSDs will have to keep waiting. Rather, this facility is going to be used for R&D and its manufacturing will be used to produce more advanced flash and experiment with new manufacturing methods for increasingly complicated stacked and denser die designs instead of beefing up supply of its current memory chips that are being used in current products.

1 North Coast Drive_Micron.png

Satellite view of Micron's existing 300mm NAND fabrication facility in northern Singapore.

Along with the new 3D NAND facility, Micron will be adding 1,000 new jobs to its existing workforce in Singapore of 7,500 over the next five years per a deal with Singapore’s Economic Development Board. Business Times and Channel News Asia note that over the past 20 years Micron has invested heavily in Singapore – north of $20 billion.

I am glad to see Micron pushing forward with its 3D NAND especially following the breakup with Intel wherein the two companies have decided to complete the development of third generation 3D NAND together and then to develop 3D NAND independently. Interestingly, Intel and Micron did not totally dissolve the IMFT joint venture as they will continue collaborating on 3D XPoint at the fab in Lehi, Utah which according to Intel is now entirely focused on XPoint memory. That was something I was curious about when first reading of the breakup early this year and happened to come across when writing this story. That press release notes that Intel and Micron are currently producing second generation 64-layer IMFT flash and developing higher density third generation flash which is slated for production next year (after which Micron and Intel will go their separate ways on NAND), so this may be a major reason for Micron building out new multi-billion-dollar fab space for NAND R&D.