HTC announces VIVE Pro Pricing, Available now for Preorder

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | March 19, 2018 - 12:09 PM |
Tagged: vive pro, steamvr, rift, Oculus, Lighthouse, htc

Today, HTC has provided what VR enthusiasts have been eagerly waiting for since the announcement of the upgraded VIVE Pro headset earlier in the year at CESthe pricing and availability of the new device.

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Available for preorder today, the VIVE Pro will cost $799 for the headset-only upgrade. As we mentioned during the VIVE Pro announcement, this first upgrade kit is meant for existing VIVE users who will be reusing their original controllers and lighthouse trackers to get everything up and running.

The HMD-only kit, with it's upgraded resolution and optics, is set to start shipping very soon on April 3 and can be preordered now on the HTC website.

Additionally, your VIVE Pro purchase (through June 3rd, 2018) will come with a free six-month subscription to HTC's VIVEPORT subscription game service, which will gain you access to up to 5 titles per month for free (chosen from the VIVEPORT catalog of 400+ games.)

There is still no word on the pricing and availability of the full VIVE Pro kit including the updated Lighthouse 2.0 trackers, but it seems likely that it will come later in the Summer after the upgrade kit has saturated the market of current VIVE owners.

As far as system requirements go, the HTC site doesn't list any difference between the standard VIVE and the VIVE Pro. One change, however, is the lack of an HDMI port on the new VIVE Pro link box, so you'll need a graphics card with an open DisplayPort 1.2 connector. 

Source: HTC

Learn about the tech in Vive's Lighthouse

Subject: General Tech | December 22, 2016 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: vive, valve, Lighthouse, alan yates

Curious about the tech behind Valve's Lighthouse room-scale VR positioning system for the HTC Vive?  Learn about it from Alan Yates, one of the leads on the project at Valve over at Hack a Day in a 40 minute video.  He discusses the various attempts at finding a way to make the positioning system work, from failed bearings to the eventual discovery of the optimal thickness for the mirror. If you can't wait for the second generation of Lighthouse, he also provides you with a way to get your hands on an ASIC on a breakout board which will help you build your own version.

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"[Alan Yates] is a hacker’s engineer. His job at Valve has been to help them figure out the hardware that makes virtual reality (VR) a real reality. And he invented a device that’s clever enough that it really should work, but difficult enough that it wasn’t straightforward how to make it work."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: HTC

Introduction and Background

Introduction

VR is rapidly gaining steam lately with the recent launch of several capable platforms. I’ve briefly sampled the various iterations of development kits and pre-release units coming through our office, and understanding how they tracked the headset position was relatively easy. Then we got to play with an HTC Vive, and things got a bit more interesting. The Vive is a ‘whole room’ VR experience. You’re not sitting at a desk with a game controller. Instead, you are holding a pair of controllers that behave more like extensions of yourself (once you get used to them, that is). Making all of this work took some extra pieces included with the kit, and the electronics technician in me was dying to know just what made this thing tick. I’d imagine other readers of this site might feel the same, so I thought it appropriate to do some digging and report my findings here.

Before diving straight into the HTC Vive, a brief history lesson of game system positional tracking is in order.

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I'll start with the Wii Remote controllers, which had a front mounted IR camera that ‘saw’ a pair of IR LED banks mounted in the ‘Sensor Bar’ – an ironic naming as the ‘sensor’ was actually in the Remotes. This setup lets you point a Wii Remote at the television and use it as a mouse. Due to the limited number of points in use, the system could not tell the Wii Remote location within the room. Instead, it could only get a vector relative to the Sensor Bar itself. Wii Remotes also contained accelerometers, but those were typically not used to assist in the accuracy of the pointing (but were used to determine if the remote was inverted, as the Sensor Bar had only two light sources).

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The Oculus Rift was essentially a reversing of the technology used in the old Nintendo Wii Remotes. The headset position and orientation are determined by a desk-mounted IR camera which ‘looks’ at IR LEDs mounted to the headset. The system dubbed ‘Constellation’, can decode the pattern (seen faintly in the above photo) and determine the headset position and orientation in space.

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Even the sides and rear of the headset have a specific LED pattern to help the camera lock on to someone looking away from it. If the IR camera sees the triangular pattern on the headset strap, it can conclude that the viewer us looking behind them.

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The HTC Vive takes a different approach here. Since it was launching with a headset and two controllers that would all need to be tracked in space simultaneously. The Wii Remote style idea would only work with a much larger grid of sensor bars (or QR codes) peppered all over the room, so that idea was out. The Rift’s constellation system might have a hard time identifying unique light patterns on multiple devices that could be far away and possibly occluding each other. So if having cameras on the headset and controllers is out, and having a camera on the desk is out, what’s left?

Read on for our in-depth look at the HTC Vive Lighthouse Tracking System