Magnetic fans, how do they work? Check out Corsair's new ML series

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 2, 2016 - 03:58 PM |
Tagged: magnetic levitation, corsair, air cooling, ML 120, ML140 Pro, ML120 Pro, led

Instead of using sleeve bearings, ball bearings or fluid dynamic bearings, the Corsair ML series relies on magnetic levitation to deal with the friction created by a spinning fan.  The fans are available in 120mm and 140mm sizes, with blue, red or white LEDS, or none if you prefer.  The fans use a 4-pin PWM connection to allow you to control their speed and should be compatible with any case, heatsink or radiator you might want to use them with.  Techgage tried them out in a Cooler Master CM 690 III.  They are somewhat pricey, the Pro version which ships with rubber mounts more so, with the non-Pro models shipping in pairs.  Read all about them in their review.

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"I’m a big fan of magnets, they’re just plain cool. Corsair was attracted to the idea of using magnets in it’s latest fans and created the ML-Series. Sporting magnetic levitation, the ML Series fans are meant to be the last set of fans you’ll ever need. Maintaing both high performance and quiet operation, we take the ML120 and ML140 PRO LED fans for a spin."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Techgage
Manufacturer: SilverStone

Introduction and Specifications

The Primera Series PM01 is a new tower enclosure from SilverStone which combines sleek looks and integrated LED lighting.

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It's been a little while since we've taken a look at a new case from SilverStone, and the company has certainly not been idle during this time. The case we have for you today is the first model from the new Primera Series, which offers "the feel of a luxurious supercar" from its angular lines and mesh grills, and it features an impressive piano black high gloss finish (a white version is also available).

The PM01 is also equipped with a trio of 140 mm intake fans, which in our black review sample are outfitted with red LED lights (the white version contains blue lighting). In addition to the front fans, the case has integrated LED lighting strips above and beneath the large side panel window, and the lighting effects can be controlled with a 4-position selector button on the top of the case.

SilverStone lists these features for the PM01 enclosure:

  • Includes three 140mm LED fans and built-in LED strips for stunning visual impact
  • Oversized front panel mesh design inspired by supercar intake grill
  • Support two 240/280/360mm radiator for AIO liquid cooler or custom water cooling
  • Reserved water tank mounting holes for water cooling setup
  • Removable filters with positive air pressure design for dust reduction
  • Built-in 4-segment LED light controller to adjustable brightness and modes
  • Super clean internal look with PSU and drive bay cover
  • Includes 10-in-1 fan hub for fan cable management

The metal mesh front and rear exhaust suggest excellent airflow, and we will find out just how effectively this new case can cool a gaming build - and how quietly it does so.

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Continue reading our review of the SilverStone Primera Series PM01 case!

Teaser - GTX 1080's Tested in SLI - EVGA SC ACX 3.0

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 27, 2016 - 02:58 PM |
Tagged: sli, review, led, HB, gtx, evga, Bridge, ACX 3.0, 3dmark, 1080

...so the time where we manage to get multiple GTX 1080's in the office here would, of course, be when Ryan is on the other side of the planet. We are also missing some other semi-required items, like the new 'SLI HB 'bridge, but we should be able to test on an older LED bridge at 2560x1440 (under the resolution where the newer style is absolutely necessary to avoid a sub-optimal experience). That said, surely the storage guy can squeeze out a quick run of 3DMark to check out the SLI scaling, right?

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For this testing, I spent just a few minutes with EVGA's OC Scanner to take advantage of GPU Boost 3.0. I cranked the power limits and fans on both cards, ending up at a stable overclock hovering at right around 2 GHz on the pair. I'm leaving out the details of the second GPU we got in for testing as it may be under NDA and I can't confirm that as all of the people to ask are in an opposite time zone, so I'm leaving out that for now (pfft - it has an aftermarket cooler). Then I simply ran Firestrike (25x14) with SLI disabled:

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...and then with it enabled:

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That works out to a 92% gain in 3DMark score, with the FPS figures jumping by almost exactly 2x. Now remember, this is by no means a controlled test, and the boss will be cranking out a much more detailed piece with frame rated results galore in the future, but for now I just wanted to get some quick figures out to the masses for consumption and confirmation that 1080 SLI is a doable thing, even on an older bridge.

*edit* here's another teaser:

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Aftermarket coolers are a good thing as evidenced by the 47c of that second GPU, but the Founders Edition blower-style cooler is still able to get past 2GHz just fine. Both cards had their fans at max speed in this example.

*edit again*

I was able to confirm we are not under NDA on the additional card we received. Behold:

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This is the EVGA Superclocked edition with their ACX 3.0 cooler.

More to follow (yes, again)!

CES 2013: Vizio Teases 4K XVT-Series LED Televisions

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2013 - 10:22 AM |
Tagged: vizio xvt series, vizio, ultra hdtv, UHD, led, edge-lit led, ces 2013, CES, 4k, 3d tv

Vizio is bringing out all the stops for CES this year with new products in all of its major areas of manufacturing. They are showing off new phones, tablets, computers, and now televisions. Specifically, the company will be teasing invited CES attendees at the Wynn Hotel ballroom with several new 4K Ultra HDTV televisions.

 

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Vizio's 80-inch M-series television. The XVT series will have a similar industrial design.

Vizio has not yet released detailed specifications, but the company has stated that the UHD televisions will be similar in form factor and design to the upcoming M-series (set to release later this year). An industrial design with thin bezel and up to 80” display are hinted at. The new XVT series will have resolutions of 4K x 2K which qualifies for the lower-tier UHD standard (with the top end being 8K). Vizio will be using edge-lit LED technology, which is likely the result of compromises necessary to facilitate the thin bezel. While full array LED with local dimming would be ideal, the company’s edge-lit technology is decent second-choice.

Further, at least some models will support 3D input and Vizio’s Theater 3D tech along with refresh rates up to 240Hz. That figure is interesting as it could mean 120Hz refresh rates per player in a multiplayer game should the TVs support the necessary glasses technology.

Naturally, Vizio is not yet talking pricing or availability. The company has only stated that it will talk about such things once the XVT series is “closer to commercial availability.” In essence, that means they will be fairly pricey and not coming anytime soon.

Even though the event is invite only and the TVs are still a ways off from an official release, it is exciting to see Vizio step into the 4K TV game in a big way. Here’s hoping they come out by next year so that Ryan can buy all of the staff one from Christmas (then maybe we would stop dying on the multiplayer after-podcast games... it’s worth a shot!)

You can find more pictures and the full press release over at Engadget as well as read more about 4K and the Ultra High Definition TV standard at PC Perspective.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Engadget
Author:
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer:

From Viewers Like You...

About two months ago, a viewer of the podcast that Ryan co-hosts on the This Week in Tech network, This Week in Computer Hardware, wrote in with some information that immediately excited the staff here at PC Perspective. Ryan for a long time has been of the opinion that the proliferation of 1080p displays, and prohibitive cost of high resolution monitors has been holding the industry back as a whole. With talk of 4K displays being introduced for consumers this year, a major topic on the podcast in the weeks prior to this viewer email had centered around why we haven't seen affordable 2560x1440 (or 2560x1600) displays.

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This brings us back to the knowledge which the listener Jeremy bestowed upon us.  Jeremy brought to our attention that various eBay sellers were reselling and exporting generic 27", IPS, LED backlight, 2560x1440 monitors from South Korea. What is remarkable about these displays however is that various models can be found for just around, or even under $350. Everyone listening, including Ryan and his co-host Patrick Norton became immediately interested in these monitors, and I went into research mode.

Continue reading our review of the 27-in Achieva Shimian 2560x1440 monitor!

Sony Shelves OLED Tech, Brings Crystal LED TV To Bear Against OLED Competition

Subject: General Tech, Displays | January 9, 2012 - 09:50 PM |
Tagged: CES, sony, led, crystal led, oled, tv

While I read a few weeks ago that Sony would not be showing off any OLED TVs at CES, I was a bit saddened. The company was the first to bring a real OLED television one step above vaporware, even if it was only 11" and prohibitively expensive it was advancing the technology. Well, CES is here and Sony did not bring any OLED television to demo, much less bring to market this year. Fortunately, LG and Samsung have the OLED TVs covered. The question of how Sony plans to compete with the OLED competition seems to be in improved LED TV technology.

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Speaking of LED TV technology, while Sony did not bring an OLED TV to CES, they did bring a new LED TV that they claim is much improved over current LED back-lit televisions. They are calling this technology "Crystal LED," and it is powering a 55" prototype television at this years CES. The 55" television uses very small RGB (red, green, and blue) LEDs to create the picture. This is an important distinction as current "LED TVs" are really just LCD televisions with LEDs as the back-light; where the LEDs shine light through the LCD pixels to create the picture. This Sony prototype is an actual LED TV, not just a branding misnomer as the LED lights are what creates the picture and not just a light source.

According to Engadget, Sony claims their true LED TV is greatly improved over LED-back-lit LCDs and offers 3.5 times the contrast, a 1.5 times wider color gamut, and is 10 times faster than LCDs. Although these are Sony's numbers and should be taken with a grain of salt (until independent reviewers can verify), they at least seem reasonable and plausible. The contrast improvement and true blacks should be readily possible thanks to the panel tech being self emitting. If done right, it should come close to the contrast offered by OLEDs which share the self-emitting property. The ability to be 10 times faster than LCDs may be the most questionable number, but still not an outrageous claim.

Stay tuned for more information as we get it! Do you think Sony's Crystal LED prototype has a chance against OLED?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Engadget

AOC Will Show Off USB Powered 22 Inch LED Monitor At CES

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2012 - 10:49 AM |
Tagged: monitor, led, display, CES, AOC, 1080p

CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, is not until next week, but the tsunami of information and products that is sure to ensue has already started to rise in the form of leaks and teaser announcements. First off today is an announcement by AOC on a product that they will be showing off at CES. According to Maximum PC, the monitor, dubbed the e2251Fwu, will be pretty impressive by USB monitor standards.

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Specifically, the monitor will be a 22 inch, LED back-lit monitor powered and connected to the PC for video via USB. It is HDCP compatible, sports a 1920x1080 resolution, 5ms response time, and 250 cd/m2 (candela per square metre) brightness, The monitor claims a 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, though comparing contrast ratios isn't very reliable (but that's another story).  Unfortuantely, I wasn't able to dig up much more information from around the web.  It will be interesting to see just how much latency the USB connection will add and whether it will be close to the panel's 5ms response time.

Further, the monitor is slated to be available in February for just under 200 bucks. For those of you that have tried out USB connected displays, how well do they work as secondary monitors?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer

Source: Maximum PC

Swap your displays CCFL with LEDs

Subject: Displays | May 31, 2011 - 12:09 PM |
Tagged: hack, mod, ccfl, led, repair

Over at Hack a Day is a video and project log of an industrious fellow whose digital picture frame backlight bit the biscuit.  Instead of buying a new one he removed the dead CCFL and replaced it with a six dollar LED strip instead of an expensive inverter or lamp for the CCFL.  The project is not easy, especially if you wish to attempt this on a full sized monitor but there are tips and tricks that should help you on your way in the full post.

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"[Fileark] had the backlight on his digital picture frame go out one day. These are generally Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps which require an inverter to source the voltage necessary for proper operation. When they stop working, the inverter is usually to blame. Since that circuit is made up of pretty small surface mount circuitry, he decided to replace the backlight with LEDs rather than repair the inverter."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Hack a Day