Today's episode features special guest Denver Jetson

Subject: Processors | March 14, 2017 - 03:17 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, JetsonTX1, Denver, Cortex A57, pascal, SoC

Amongst the furor of the Ryzen launch the NVIDIA's new Jetson TX2 SoC was quietly sent out to reviewers and today the NDA expired so we can see how it performs.  There are more Ryzen reviews below the fold, including Phoronix's Linux testing if you want to skip ahead.  In addition to the specifications in the quote, you will find 8GB of 128-bit LPDDR4 offering memory bandwidth of 58.4 GB/s and 32GBs of eMMC for local storage.  This Jetson is running JetPack 3.0 L4T based off of the Linux 4.4.15 kernel.  Phoronix tested out its performance, see for yourself.

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"Last week we got to tell you all about the new NVIDIA Jetson TX2 with its custom-designed 64-bit Denver 2 CPUs, four Cortex-A57 cores, and Pascal graphics with 256 CUDA cores. Today the Jetson TX2 is shipping and the embargo has expired for sharing performance metrics on the JTX2."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: Phoronix

Need a hand picking a low power ARM system?

Subject: Systems | January 13, 2016 - 02:36 PM |
Tagged: arm, raspberry pi zero, jetson tk1, JetsonTX1

If you are curious how the various ARM powered boards currently on the market compare to each other then the gang over at Phoronix has a real treat for you.  They have assembled a plethora of systems including the ODROID C1+, Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2, Orange Pi Plus, Orange Pi PC, Banana Pi M2 as well as the Jetson TK1, and Jetson TX1 for comparison purposes.  Most of the systems use a Cortex A7 though you will also see an A5 as well as an A57.  The tests are varied as it can be difficult to determine what performance should be benchmarked on these systems although some like the OpenSSL test are obvious.  Since part of the reason you would choose a low power ARM system is the price, they wrap up with a performance-per-dollar rating to help you choose the best valued system for what you need it to do.

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"For those interested in small, low-power ARM single-board computers, up for your viewing pleasure today are benchmarks of several different boards from the Raspberry Pi Zero to the Banana Pi M2."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

Source: Phoronix

NVIDIA's new Tesla M40 series

Subject: General Tech | November 11, 2015 - 06:12 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, Tesla M40, neural net, JetsonTX1

There are a lot of colloquialisms tossed about such as AI research and machine learning which refer to the work being done designing neural nets by feeding in huge amounts of data to an architecture capable of forming and weighting connections in an attempt to create a system capable of processing that input in a meaningful way.  You might be familiar with some of the more famous experiments such as Google's Deep Dream and Wolfram's Language
Image Identification Project
.  As you might expect this takes a huge amount of computational power and NVIDA has just announced the Tesla M40 accelerator card for training deep neural nets.  It is fairly low powered at 50-75W of draw and NVIDIA claims it will be able to deal with five times more simultaneous video streams than previous products.  Along with this comes Hyperscale Suite software, specifically designed to work on the new hardware which Jen-Hsun Huang comments on over at The Inquirer.  

At the end of the presentation he also mentioned the tiny Jetson TX1 SoC.  It has 256-core Maxwell GPU capable of 1TFLOPS, a 64-bit ARM A57 CPU, 4GB of memory and communicates via Ethernet or Wi-Fi all on a card 50x87mm (2x3.4)" in size.  It will be available at $300 when released some time early next year.

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"Machine learning is the grand computational challenge of our generation. We created the Tesla hyperscale accelerator line to give machine learning a 10X boost. The time and cost savings to data centres will be significant."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer