Lucky winners choice; an i7-8086k or a Threadripper 1950X

Subject: General Tech | June 19, 2018 - 02:37 PM |
Tagged: Intel, amd, i7-8086k, 1950x, funny

If you are so lucky as to be one of the 8086 people who won an Intel i7-8086K, live in the US and can be one of the first 40 to respond to AMD you can trade in your Anniversary Edition for a Threadripper 1950X.  AMD have offered this limited, tongue in cheek deal for those who prefer a higher PCIe lane count to a higher frequency, at least as long as you are a US resident.   The i7-8086K does offer better overall performance, though it can be finicky as Ken and others have discovered.  The Intel contest is closed, but they do state it may take up to two weeks for the winners to receive a confirmation email, hopefully they arrive in time for those who would like to swap.  The Inquirer has a link to Intel's Twitter response to this move, if you are interested.

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"AMD HAS PICKED UP A STICK and decided to give Intel a damn-good prod, as it's offering people who've won the Core i7-8086K the option to trade it in for its own Threadripper 1950X."

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Source: The Inquirer

Intel's 8 Cores meal; comes with a Coffee Refresh

Subject: General Tech | June 15, 2018 - 02:38 PM |
Tagged: Intel, rumour, coffee lake refresh

Kudos to Intel for choosing to name their Coffee Lake Refresh exactly that, instead of adding an 'S' to the end of the name.   The refresh is rumoured to include an 8-core mainstream model, which will somewhat narrow AMD's current lead.  The rumours The Inquirer heard also suggest a 22-core high end model is a possibility, certainly an interesting count if nothing else.  This would come at a cost however, a run of Coffee Lake Refresh suggests that Cannon Lake may need a little work before it can be fired off.

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"The schedule states that Intel will launch the 8-core chip as an extension of the existing Coffee Lake family of processors in a few months' time, but it will be named the Coffee Lake Refresh, not the Coffee Lake S as previously speculated."

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Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #503 - Intel i7-8086K, Corsair Void Pro headset, and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 14, 2018 - 03:24 PM |
Tagged: video, zotac, VOID PRO, toshiba, Optane, noctua, logitech, Intel, i7-8086k, G512, corsair, coolermaster, amd, podcast

PC Perspective Podcast #503 - 06/14/18

Join us this week for discussion on Intel i7-8086K, Corsair Void Pro headset, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:18:14

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:10:55 Ryan: Transcend USB 3.0 Card Reader for $8!
      1. Can get it in pink for $.01 less!
    2. 1:12:10 Jeremy: Go for the Gold with Corsair’s Crystal Series 460X
    3. 1:13:15 Josh: Whoa...
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

Intel confirms first graphics chips will land in 2020

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 12, 2018 - 02:21 PM |
Tagged: Intel, graphics, gpu, raja koduri

This article first appeared on MarketWatch.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich disclosed during an analyst event last week that it will have its first discrete graphics chips available in 2020. This will mark the beginning of the chip giant’s journey towards a portfolio of high-performance graphics products for various markets including gaming, data center, and AI.

Some previous rumors posited that a launch at CES 2019 this coming January might be where Intel makes its graphics reveal, but that timeline was never adopted by Intel. It would have been drastically overaggressive and in no way reasonable with the development process of a new silicon design.

Back in November 2017 Intel brought on board Raja Koduri to lead the graphics and compute initiatives inside the company. Koduri was previously in charge of the graphics division at AMD, helping to develop and grow the Radeon brand, and his departure to Intel was thought to have significant impact on the industry.

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A typical graphics architecture and chip development cycle is three years for complex design, so even hitting the 2020 window with engineering talent is aggressive.

Intel did not go into detail about what performance level or target market this first discrete GPU solution might address, but Intel EVP of the Data Center Group Navin Shenoy confirmed that the company’s strategy will include solutions for data center segments (think AI, machine learning) along with client (think gaming, professional development).

This is a part of the wider scale AI and machine learning strategy for Intel, that includes these discrete graphics chip products in addition to other options like the Xeon processor family, FPGAs from its acquisition of Altera, and custom AI chips like the Nervana-based NNP.

While the leader in the space, NVIDIA, maintains its position with graphics chips, it is modifying and augmenting these processors with additional features and systems to accelerate AI even more. It will be interesting to see how Intel plans to catch up in design and deployment.

Though few doubt the capability of Intel for chip design, building a new GPU architecture from the ground up is not a small task. Intel needs to provide a performance and efficiency level that is in the same ballpark as NVIDIA and AMD; within 20% or so. Doing that on the first attempt, while also building and fostering the necessary software ecosystem and tools around the new hardware is a tough ask of any company, Silicon Valley juggernaut or no. Until we see the first options available in 2020 to gauge, NVIDIA and AMD have the leadership positions.

Both AMD and NVIDIA will be watching Intel with great interest as GPU development accelerates. AMD’s Forest Norrod, SVP of its data center group, recently stated in an interview that he didn’t expect Koduri at Intel to “have any impact at Intel for at least another three years.” If Intel can deliver on its 2020 target for the first in a series of graphics releases, it might put pressure on these two existing graphics giants sooner than most expected.

Source: MarketWatch

Computex 2018: G.Skill Attains 13 Overclocking World Records Including DDR4 5543 MHz

Subject: General Tech | June 11, 2018 - 11:25 PM |
Tagged: Trident Z RGB, samsung b-die, overclocking, msi, LN2, liquid nitrogen, Intel, G.Skill, ddr4, computex 2018, computex

G.Skill held its annual extreme overclocking competitions (the OC World Cup Competition and OC World Record Stage) at Computex 2018 in Taipei where the overclockers managed to break 13 world records including the two highest DDR4 clockspeeds and the fastest Core i7-8700K clockspeed.

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Overclocking teams from around the world using Intel processors, G.Skill DDR4 memory, and motherboards from MSI, EVGA, and ASRock along with extreme cooling methods (de-lidding and loads of LN2) were used to set the world records in 3DMark Fire Strike, SuperPi, Maxxmem, Geekbench 4, GPUPi for CPU, WPrime, and PiFast benchmarks along with hardware records of DDR4 5543 MHz and an Intel Core i7-8700K at 7409.03 MHz.

On the memory front, G.Skill notes that Toppc is now the world record holder with the DDR4-5543 MHz overclock achieved using an Intel i7-8700K, MSI Z370I Gaming Pro Carbon AC, and G.Skill Trident Z RGB memory. Following Toppc’s overclock Kovan Yang managed to achieve the second highest DDR4 clockspeed record at DDR4-5541 MHz on the MSI X299 Gaming Pro Carbon AC motherboard and Intel Core i7-7740X processor which is an interesting feat on the HEDT platform.

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Other notable benchmark world records include a 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme Single score of 20,320 (i9-7980XE and EVGA X299 Dark platform), Geekbench4 Single Core score of 9842 points (i7-8700K on an ASRock Z170M OC Formula), WPRIME -32M score of 1.937 seconds, and a SuperPi 32M score of 4 minutes and 8.922 seconds.

Interestingly, G.Skill’s video coverage (embedded below) shows both manual full pot cooling as well as the automated Roboclocker LN2 cooler being used. The video jumps from scene to scene quickly but it does give you some glimpses at the process and the pots/heatsinks used with the RAM and processor to keep things cool even when cranking up the voltage and clocks!

Also read:

Source: G.Skill

Should you wait for the i9-8088K anniversary instead?

Subject: Processors | June 11, 2018 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: Intel, i7-8086k, coffee lake-s, 8086

Now, before you decided to comment on Ken's i7-8086K article, consider he is not the only one who has encountered issues with Intel's Anniversary silicon.  The Tech Report offers succinct advice in their review as well "the i7-8086K isn't worth the $75 upcharge over the i7-8700K at stock speeds."  They manually overclocked the chip and found the same 5.1GHz limit, as the processors are thermally identical regardless of the handpicked artisan silicon inside the i7-8086K.  The 5GHz stock speed advertised does not seem to be available right out of the box but instead requires a bit of work.

On the other hand, if you like the idea of an Anniversary model CPU and would enjoy manually overclocking, the extra $75 might mean very little to you.

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"Intel's Core i7-8086K is the company's first CPU with a 5-GHz Turbo speed out of the box. We dig deep to see whether this chip has the cachet to live up to its limited-edition billing."

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Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: Intel

A Weekend of Misadventure

Last Friday marked the release of the Intel Core i7-8086K to consumers through retail channels like Amazon, Newegg, and Microcenter. Announced just earlier that week at Computex, the i7-8086K is essentially an i7-8770K, running slightly higher clock speeds, and is meant as a limited edition item to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Intel’s 8086 processor, which marked the beginning of the x86 microarchitecture.

Eager to test this new CPU, I picked one up from our local Microcenter on Friday evening, and plugged it into our Coffee Lake CPU testbed, powered by a Gigabyte Z370 Aorus Gaming 7 motherboard (updated to the latest BIOS), let my first pass of automated CPU benchmarks run, and went off with the rest of my evening.

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Saturday, when I came back to look at the results, they seemed mediocre at best, with the i7-8086K trading blows with the i7-8700K. While the extra 300MHz of clock speed seemed like it would provide more of a benefit than I was seeing, it wasn’t entirely unexpected that performance might not be spectacularly higher than the i7-8700K so I continued to run through the rest of our standard CPU benchmarking suite, as well as our CPU gaming benchmarks.

Finally looking at all of the data together, it appeared there was no change from the i7-8700K to the i7-8086K leading me to do some more digging.

Equipped with Intel’s Extreme Tuning Utility, I began to measure the clock speeds during several benchmarks.

8086k-XTU.png

Much to my surprise, even on purely single-threaded workload, such as Cinebench R15 in Single mode, the processor wasn’t getting close to its 5.0GHz Single Core Turbo Boost frequency, in fact, I never saw it get above 4.5GHz. We corroborated these issues with another piece of CPU monitoring software, HWInfo64.

As you can see in the screenshot from XTU, the processor was sitting at a cool 48C while this was going on, and no other alerts such as the motherboard power delivery or current limit throttling were an issue during our testing.

Moving to another motherboard, the ASUS Strix Z370-H Gaming, again on the latest UEFI release, we saw the same behavior.

So far, we have been unable to get this processor to operate at the advertised 5.0GHz Turbo Boost frequency, on a multitude of different hardware and software setups.

However, if we manually overclock the processor, we can get an all-core frequency of 5.1GHz, although with a temperature around 85C.

At this point, we are left puzzled and disappointed by the launch of the i7-8086K. This is the same hardware and software setup we used for all of our CPU benchmarking for the recent Ryzen 7 2700X review, with no issues. We even tried a fresh, fully updated Windows install on a separate SSD, to help eliminate any potential for weird software issues.

Jeff at The Tech Report used the same Gigabyte Z370 Aorus Gaming 7 motherboard as us, and while he didn’t see great performance overall, you can see explicit scaling in pure single-threaded workloads like Cinebench in his review.

As far as the ASUS motherboard we also tried is concerned, the i7-8086K is listed on ASUS’ CPU compatibility list for UEFI 1301 (which we are running), so it seems there should be no issue.

DSC04982.JPG

This morning, the i7-8086K we ordered on Amazon showed up, and did the exact same thing, in both test setups. 

To be fair, based on the reviews that we have seen pop up thus far, including The Tech Report, the resulting performance if things were configured correctly doesn’t appear to be worth the extra cost.

DSC04986.JPG

What was meant to be a celebration of Intel’s 40 years of the X86 architecture seems more like a rushed release than a fully baked product. Remember, we bought this processor directly from a retail outlet with no intervention from Intel. Without the proper BIOS-level support, and potentially a more widespread issue affecting normal consumers building machines with i7-8086K.

Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel

A little Optane for your HDD

Intel's Optane Memory caching solution, launched in April of 2017, was a straightforward feature. On supported hardware platforms, consisting of 7th and 8th generation Core processor-based computers, users could add a 16 or 32gb Optane M.2 module to their PC and enable acceleration for their slower boot device (generally a hard drive). Beyond that, there weren't any additional options; you could only enable and disable the caching solution. 

However, users who were looking for more flexibility were out of luck. If you already had a fast boot device, such as an NVMe SSD, you had no use for these Optane Memory modules, even if you a slow hard drive in their system for mass storage uses that you wanted to speed up.

DSC04972.JPG

At GDC this year, Intel alongside the announcement of 64GB Optane Memory modules, announced that they are bringing support for secondary drive acceleration to the Optane Memory application.

Now that we've gotten our hands on this new 64GB module and the appropriate software, it's time to put it through its paces and see if it was worth the wait.

Performance

The full test setup is as follows:

Test System Setup
CPU

Intel Core i7-8700K

Motherboard Gigabyte H370 Aorus Gaming 3 
Memory

16GB Crucial DDR4-2666 (running at DDR4-2666)

Storage

Intel SSD Optane 800P 

Intel Optane Memory 64GB and 1TB Western Digital Black

Sound Card On-board
Graphics Card NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB
Graphics Drivers NVIDIA 397.93
Power Supply Corsair RM1000x
Operating System Windows 10 Pro x64 RS4

optanecache-5.png

In coming up with test scenarios to properly evaluate drive caching on a secondary, mass storage device, we had a few criteria. First, we were looking for scenarios that require lots of storage, meaning that they wouldn't fit on a smaller SSD. In addition to requiring a lot of storage, the applications must also rely on fast storage. 

Click here to continue reading our look at accelerating secondary drives with Optane

What's the horsepower equivalent of -185C? The i7-8086K passes 7GHz

Subject: General Tech, Processors | June 8, 2018 - 01:39 PM |
Tagged: overclocking, Intel, i7-8086k, der8auer

Der8auer is at it again, this time pushing Intel's Anniversary Edition i7-8086K quickly passing 7GHz in initial overclocking, showing just how well picked these Core i7-8700K's are.  He pushed the core voltage up past 1.85V and used an impressive amount of LN to accomplish this feat but he feels there is more to this processor.  Having had more time to work on overclocking 8700K's he has successfully pushed them to 7.3GHz, so in theory the 8086K should be able to beat that.  Take a look at the video posted on the Inquirer to see this happen.

You can also try to get your hands on one for free here.

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"The processor, announced this week at Computex, commemorates 40 years of x86 computing and out of the box can hit 5GHz on a single core without overclocking via the chip's boost frequency."

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Source: The Inquirer

This is your Yoga on tiger blood; Intel's dual display demo duo

Subject: General Tech, Mobile, Shows and Expos | June 7, 2018 - 01:13 PM |
Tagged: Tiger Rapids, Intel, kaby lake

Recently seen in the Lenovo Yoga devices, mobile devices with dual screens are attracting attention but so far the implementation has not been without troubles.  Intel showed off two prototype machines at Computex that they believe will offer what this segment of customers is looking for.  The Tiger Rapids machine has a conventional touchscreen on one side and some sort of electronic paper display on the other, which has a bit of give to it so that using a stylus on it gives you some tactile feedback.  It is powered by a Kaby Lake processor of some description, with an SSD and the unfortunately common lone USB Type-C port on it.  At 4.7mm thin it is a fairly impressive design. 

Their second does not bear a code name but resembles the Yoga as it has two traditional touchscreens with one generally displaying a keyboard.   We don't know much about them, but you can take a peek at them over at The Inquirer.

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"The first machine codenamed Tiger Rapids - this is Intel after all - mixes one touchscreen panel with an electronic paper display designed specifically for note taking and stylus scribbling, even coming with a slight give to simulate writing on paper."

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Source: The Inquirer