Feel that Hyper Pulsefire Surge in the palm of your hand

Subject: General Tech | June 15, 2018 - 03:01 PM |
Tagged: Pulsefire Surge, PMW3389, NGenuity, kingston, input, hyperx

There are two things that stand out about this new mouse from Kingston HyperX, the moniker they hung on it and the RGB programmability.  The Pulsefire Surge may sound like a special attack you need to charge up but The Tech Report found it to be fairly generic, from the shape of the body to the Pixart PMW3389 IR LED sensor.  However, for those who love to put on a lightshow, the HyperX NGenuity software offers a unique trick.  You can program the 33 RGB LED clusters individually, offering a chance for a truly enlightened mouse, if you are willing to pay the $70 MSRP.

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"HyperX's Pulsefire Surge starts with a proven design and rings it with an array of configurable RGB LEDs to let gamers enjoy both form and function. We put the Pulsefire Surge to the mat to see whether it games as well as it glows."

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Logitech's new G512 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard and GX Blue key switch

Subject: General Tech | June 12, 2018 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: input, logitech g, GX Blue, G513, G512, mechanical keyboard

Logitech G revealed a new type of keyswitch that will be available on the G513 and new G512 mechanical keyboards as well as early access to new control software called G Hub. 

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You are likely already familiar with the G513, which Christopher recently reviewed.  That model used Romer-G linear switches with a model using tactile switches also available, adding a bump at the end of a keypress.  You will now be able to chose a model with the new GX Blue key switch, which offers an audible and tactile click at the end of your keypress, filling out the majority of the preferred mechanical switch types. 

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The new G512 keyboard is physically similar to the G513 but in a slimmed down package.  The wrist rest has been removed as well as the kit to pull off your keycaps to replace them with your own favourites.  It does retain all the LIGHTSYNC RGBs, along with the ability to program your lightshows using the Logitech Gaming Software you can grab from Logitech; unless you are feeling adventurous. 

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Depending on your location, you can try out the pre-release version of Logitech's new G Hub software which will replace LGS in the near future. The new software will offer all the functionality of LGS but with an improved interface to let you be even more creative with your shiny, shiny lights. 

 

Source: Logitech

Who needs switches when you can have buckling springs!

Subject: General Tech | June 5, 2018 - 07:02 PM |
Tagged: input, buckling springs, ibm model m, unicomp, ultra classic

Unicomp describes their Ultra Classic keyboard as hand made, which The Tech Report does not find sufficient to explain a variety of minor flaws in the build of the keycaps and chassis.  The bottom and sides of the otherwise extremely well made keycaps are rough, showing rough marks remaining from the moulding process and the bottom of the keyboard is not particularly flat.  Considering the aesthetics of the IBM Model M, this is unlikely to deter fans from considering purchasing the keyboard.  What really matters is the feel, which when they got around to describing it included the word 'joy'.  The keycaps are replaceable, the red and yellow ones in the picture below are not the originals so the minor marring from the manufacturing process can be resolved if you are as interested in form as you are in function.  Take a gander at the full review and see what you think.

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"Unicomp's Ultra Classic keyboard takes the iconic buckling-spring key switch that's been the darling of many a keyboard enthusiast and packages it in a slimmer, sleeker chassis than the original IBM Model M. We got the Ultra Classic under our fingers to see whether it's as timeless as ever."

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Roll your own keyboard

Subject: General Tech | May 24, 2018 - 01:44 PM |
Tagged: DIY, input, mechanical keyboard

The mechanical keyboard market is huge, with numerous companies offering a variety of designs, switches and keycaps but perhaps you just can't yet find the perfect model.  One answer to that dilemma would be to build your own keyboard from scratch and TechSpot just published a guide to help you do just that.  In part one they provide a bill of materials you can build a shopping list out of, with an impressive amount of choices for each component.  In part two they cover the build process as well as a large gallery of designs which just might inspire you to take this project on.

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"In the world of mechanical keyboards, big brand names like Corsair, Razer, HyperX, etc., take the bulk of the limelight. But what if I told you that every part of a keyboard can be customized? This goes far beyond the aesthetics, so if you're not one for making compromises, it may be time to build your own."

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Source: TechSpot

Supercap the mouse, meet Razer's Mamba and Firefly Hyperflux

Subject: General Tech | May 17, 2018 - 04:02 PM |
Tagged: supercapacitor, razer, Mamba, firefly, hyperflux, wireless charging, input, gaming mouse

Razer have made some interesting choices with their Hyperflux wireless mouse and charging mat.  The Mamba Hyperflux does not contain a battery, instead depending on a constant flow of energy from the FireFly Hyperflux powered mouse mat or via the provided USB cable if you want to forgoe the wireless capabilities altogether.  It seems this choice came with a price, Kitguru has seen it for sale at £249.95, the US price at Amazon is a similar number, which makes this quite expensive comparatively.  Is it worth the cost or are you just paying extra for a unique feature?  Check out the video review for Kitguru's thoughts.

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"Creating a light gaming mouse has always been a challenge for one simple reason – it needs a battery. That’s what we thought, at least, until Razer introduced its Mamba Hyperflux gaming mouse. It weighs just 96g and simply does not have a battery – instead, it uses magnetic induction to receive power directly, thanks to the use of a supercapacitor."

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Source: Kitguru

i-Rocks' K70E gaming keyboard, rocking those capacitive switches

Subject: General Tech | April 26, 2018 - 06:37 PM |
Tagged: RGB, K70E, input, i-Rocks, gaming keyboard, capacitive switches

i-Rocks developed their own non-contact electro-capacitive switches for their new K70E keyboard, which will feel more like a membrane keyboard than a mechanical switch but offer you the choice of 2.2 mm (high) or 1.4 mm (low) actuation depths.  There are independent RGBs under each and every key which can display a variety of colours, programmed via their driver.  If you don't like the white fascia, there are various skins you can place over the keyboard and cap fetishists will appreciate the thick ABS plastic construction and doubleshot injected primary legends.  There is a full review typed out at TechPowerUp.

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"The i-Rocks K70E is a high-end keyboard with a feature set boasting configurable capacitive switches and per-key RGB backlighting, with software support backing onboard controls. At the same time, it retains the fun factor by using a transparent top plate and accessory paper skins for a high degree of customization."

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Source: TechPowerUp

In need of an ergonomic mechanical keyboard?

Subject: General Tech | April 11, 2018 - 03:07 PM |
Tagged: input, mechanical keyboard, ergonomic, kinesis, Freestyle Edge, Cherry MX, cherry mx red, cherry mx blue, cherry mx brown

There are those who prefer an ergonomic keyboard design over the standard model, which means most of the new mechanical keyboards do not meet their needs.  Kinesis offers an alternative, the Freestyle Edge available with Cherry MX Red, Bue or Brown switches and a separated keypad.  You do not need install the SmartSet App to use this keyboard but it is worth it as you can reprogram every keys function, add up to three macros on the appropriate keys, with delays, and of course to control your RGBs.  Check TechPowerUp for the full review.

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"Kinesis, with over 25 years of experience in developing ergonomic peripherals, has brought to market the Freestyle Edge keyboard as part of their new gaming brand. With a split keyboard configuration, extensive customization options, and nothing but Cherry mechanical switches, the Freestyle Edge offers a new take on ergonomics for gamers and casual end users alike."

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Source: TechPowerUp

Master, I have created a Cooler Mouse

Subject: General Tech | March 5, 2018 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: input, mastermouse, cooler master, MM520, PWM3360

Follow their trend of shoehorning Master into the name of all of their products, Cooler Master have release the MasterMouse MM520.  As you can see they did not follow the pack and have created a different looking and feeling mouse.  If you have mastered the claw grip, then this mouse is designed specifically for you; if not take a look at some of the comparison shots TechPowerUp posted to get an idea how the shape of this mouse differs from the norm.  Technically the mouse should appear, it uses the PWM3360 optical sensor and PBT main buttons however the shape is going to play a part in your enjoyment of this rodent.

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"Cooler Master's MM520 mouse uses great materials, a top optical sensor, and features highly customizable RGB lighting. While the shape might not be for everyone, it could be your top weapon of choice for all different kinds of game genres."

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Source: TechPowerUp

Tesoro's GRAM Spectrum takes on the low profile mechanical keyboard heavyweights

Subject: General Tech | February 9, 2018 - 02:38 PM |
Tagged: input, mechanical keyboard, Tesoro, GRAM Spectrum, Tesoro Agile

Not to be confused with a certain UK based grocery chain, Tesoro have been making peripherals for a while now and have just released a new low profile mechanical keyboard.  As is tradition now, a new keyboard deserves new switches, the GRAM Spectrum features Tesoro Agile Blue or Red switches with an actuation distance of 1.5mm and a 50 million click lifespan.  Benchmark Reviews found these switches comparable to Cherry switches of the same colour and as you can see below they feature clear plastic to allow your RGBs to flow freely from underneath the keycaps.  Drop by for details on the software and their final verdict.

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"Over the last few months, we have seen more and more low-profile mechanical keyboards hitting the market. With the Tesoro GRAM Spectrum, it comes with all the goodies normally seen on a mechanical gaming keyboard. But the feature that sets this one apart from the rest are the low-profile mechanical switches."

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GooBang drops a Doo on your desk, the ET-8178 RGB Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

Subject: General Tech | January 31, 2018 - 02:52 PM |
Tagged: unfortunate, GooBang, Doo ET-8178 RGB, gaming keyboard, mechanical keyboard, input, outemu

The unfortunately named GooBang Doo ET-8178 RGB is a mechanical keyboard which uses Outemu Blue switches which Kitguru discovered to be very similar in feel to Cherry Blue switches.  It ships without a numpad nor any software, the RGBs are controlled by function keys which allow you to swap between a half dozen modes.  The keyboard itself compares favourably to more familiar brands such as Corsair and Thermaltake but at around ~$50US it is significantly less expensive.  It currently seems to be limited in availability in NA, but worth investigating if you are on the other side of the pond.

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"While there is no chance that the name is familiar to you, GooBang does have a number of products listed on Amazon and has been trading for at least a couple of years. The company’s web site itself is tragic, so we had no idea what to expect when offered the ‘Doo’ keyboard."

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Source: Kitguru