Ti-ny bubbles in my card, watercooling the GTX 1080 Ti

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 13, 2017 - 02:05 PM |
Tagged: gtx 1080 ti, phanteks, G1080, watercooling

Phanteks announced their G1080 water block for GTX 1080 Ti's a while back but we hadn't seen it in action until now.  [H]ard|OCP installed the cooler on a Founders Edition card and created a video of the process.  Not only do they show how to properly install the water block they also cover a few of the possible issues you might encounter while doing so.  They also made a video showing how the coolant flows through the waterblock which is not only pretty but can help you determine where to insert your GPU into your watercooling loop.

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"Phanteks recently sent us its Glacier series water block for our Founders Edition GTX 1080 Ti. We take you through the full process of getting it installed. We check out the mating surfaces of the GPU, capacitors, and MOSFETs and show you just how well it all fits together. Then finally we show exactly how the coolant flows in 4K!"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

XSPC Razor Neo Waterblock is pretty, effective

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 23, 2017 - 01:30 PM |
Tagged: watercooler, gtx 1080 ti, nvidia, XSPC, Razer Neo

It seems a shame to hide the XSPC Razor Neo watercooler for the GTX 1080 Ti as you will not easily see the polished nickel plated copper waterblock and tempered glass window XSPC used.  [H]ard|OCP found the design to be very scratch resistant and it allows you to completely avoid the cracks which acrylic inevitably develops as it ages.  This waterblock is not just decorative, [H] found the card would hit and remain at 2100.5MHz in game, with temperatures never exceeding 33C, with or without the Frag Harder Disco Lights going.

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"If you are thinking about delving in water cooling your high end NVIDIA GTX 1080 or 1080 Ti video card, the XSPC Razor Neo is certainly worthy of being on your short list. Outside of its incredibly good looks, Frag Harder Disco Lights, and easy install process, does it work well when it comes to overclocking and cooling your GTX 1080 Ti?"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Zotac Shrinks GTX 1080 Ti Into Water-Cooled Small Form Factor ArcticStorm Mini

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 25, 2017 - 03:34 PM |
Tagged: zotac, gtx 1080 ti, SFF, water cooler

Zotac finally made its watercooled GTX 1080 Ti ArcticStorm Mini official last week. A card that was first teased at Computex, the ArcticStorm Mini is a dual slot with metal backplate and full cover water block that has been significantly shortened such that it can fit into many more cases including Micro ATX and some Mini ITX form factors. Specifically, the ArcticStorm Mini measures 212mm (8.35”) x 164mm (6.46”) and uses a custom shortened PCB that appears to be the same platform as the dual fan air cooled model.

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The star of the ArcticStorm Mini is the full cover waterblock with nickel plated copper base and a tinted acrylic top cover. According to Zotac the waterblock uses 0.3mm micro channels above the GPU to improve cooling performance by moving as much heat from the GPU into the water loop as possible. There are ports for vertical or horizontal barb orientation though I would have loved to see a card that routed the water cooling in and out ports to the rear of the card rather than the side especially since this is aimed at small form factor builds. The water block can accommodate standard G1/4” fittings and Zotac includes two barbs that support 10mm ID (inner diameter) tubing in the box. A metal backplate helps prevent warping of the PCB from the water cooling which can be rather hefty.

While there is no RGB on this card, Zotac did go with an always on white LED that along with the gray and silver colors of the card itself are supposed to be color neutral and allow it to fit into more builds (as opposed to Zotac’s usual yellow and black colors). Around the front are five display outputs including: DVI-D, HDMI 2.0b, and three DisplayPort 1.4 connections.

Out of the box, the GTX 1080 Ti ArcticStorm Mini comes with a modest factory overlock that pushes the GP102’s 3,584 CUDA cores to 1506 MHz base and 1620 MHz boost. The 11GB of GDDR5X remains clocked at the stock 11 GHz, however. (For comparison, reference clocks are 1480 MHz base and 1582 MHz boost.) The graphics card is powered by two 8-pin PCI-E power connectors and enthusiasts should be able to push it quite a bit further than the out of the box clocks simply by increasing the power target as we saw in our review of the 1080 Ti, and barring any silicon lottery duds this card should be able to clock higher and have more stable clocks than our card thanks to the liquid cooler.

As is usual with these things, Zotac did not reveal exact pricing or availability, but with the full sized GTX 1080 Ti ArcticStorm already selling for $809 on Amazon and $820 over at Newegg, I would expect the little SFF brother to sell for a bit of a premium beyond that, say $840 at launch with the price going down a bit with sales later.

It would have been nice to see this be a single slot card, and giving up DVI would be worth it, but you can’t have everything (heh). I am looking forward to seeing the systems modders and enthusiasts are able to cram this card (or two) into!

Source: Zotac

How much does the driver matter when playing Forza 7?

Subject: General Tech | October 18, 2017 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: forza motorsport 7, amd, nvidia, vega 64, vega 56, gtx 1070, GTX 1080, gtx 1080 ti, gaming

[H]ard|OCP recently used Forza 7 in their GPU benchmarks and discovered that AMD's Vega 64 outperformed the GTX 1080 by a noticeable margin.  NVIDIA responded by releasing two new drivers in quick succession, claiming performance improvements of up to 25% in this title, which prompted [H] to revisit there results with the newest drivers from both companies.  They tested at both 1440p and at 4K and saw changes, though perhaps not as great as NVIDIA first announced.  Take a look at the review here and consider the question they pose in their conclusions.

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"Forza Motorsport 7 gaming performance has changed, video cards stack up differently when compared. We take Forza Motorsport 7 and apply new NVIDIA GeForce 387.92 and AMD Crimson ReLive 17.10.1 drivers to find out how these compare, what performance differences there are, and if AMD Radeon RX Vega is still king in this game."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Good things come in three, the new MSI GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X TRIO

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 12, 2017 - 03:23 PM |
Tagged: msi, gtx 1080 ti, gtx 1080 ti gaming x trio, TRI-FROZR

MSI have just announced the GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X TRIO, which will hit the market in November, though with the current price of Bitcoin you may have trouble locating one.

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The cards will feature their Tri-Frozr cooler with two 10cm and one 9cm TORX 2.0 fans along with a pair of 8mm SuperPipes which will provide 300W of heat dissipation for those planning on pushing the overclock even further.  It will also have Mystic Light, offering you three zones of controllable RGBs, with the option to synchronize the light show emanating from your various components. 

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Source: MSI

Corsair's Hydro GFX GTX 1080 Ti; a splash of water really opens it up

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 28, 2017 - 02:46 PM |
Tagged: corsair, gtx 1080 ti, hydro gfx, liquid cooled, factory overclocked

Corsair's Hydro GFX GTX 1080 Ti liquid cooled GPU offers two preset modes, a respectable Gaming mode with frequencies of 1544MHz base, 1657MHz boost and a more impressive OC Mode which runs at 1569MHz and 1683MHz.  [H]ard|OCP blasted past those frequencies when overclocking, hitting a 2050MHz GPU, 11.6GHz memory after increasing the power settings.  This was enough to allow playable frame rates at 4k on the games they tested, even with graphics settings pushed up.  If 4k gaming is in your plans, this review is worth checking out.

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"We’ve got an exciting new video card for you today, the Corsair Hydro GFX GTX 1080 Ti Liquid Cooled Graphics Card with a Corsair Hydro Series AIO liquid cooling package on board. We find out how well this video card performs, how cool it runs, and how well it will overclock at 4K and 1440p."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Extra memory! The EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 ELITE

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 22, 2017 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 ELITE, gtx 1080 ti, evga

EVGA has released a new improved GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 Elite card, with 11GB of GDDR5x, running at 12GHz with a bandwidth of 528.3 GB/s.  The reference card has GDDR5x running at 11GHz with 484 GB/s of memory bandwidth so it will be interesting to see how this changes the performance of the card. 

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The iCX cooler on the card offers nine thermal sensors and multiple MCUs along with asynchronous fan control to manage both heat and sound simultaneously.  You can choose between black or white models depending on the colour scheme in your PC and there are customizable RGB colour for the visual alarms present on the card.  PR just below the back end.

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September 21st, 2017 – The EVGA GeForce GTX 1080Ti FTW3 ELITE cards are now available with 12GHz of GDDR5 memory, giving it 528 GB/s of memory bandwidth! These cards are available with either the ELITE Black or White shroud, and of course comes with EVGA’s exclusive iCX technology, giving you 9 thermal sensors, onboard thermal LED indicators and incredible cooling with quiet operation.

Features

  • Includes EVGA iCX Technology
  • 12GHz GDDR5 Memory
  • 528 GB/s of Memory Bandwidth
  • Available in ELITE Black and White Colors

Includes EVGA iCX Technology

  • Featuring a total of 11 global patents (pending and granted), iCX is efficiency perfected.
  • 9 Additional Sensors and MCU's embedded on the PCB.
  • Purposefully-directed Airflow Chambers.
  • Newly Designed Die-Cast Baseplate and Backplate.
  • Full Control Using EVGA Precision XOC.
  • EVGA's iCX is the Very Definition of Interactive Cooling.

Learn more and buy now at https://www.evga.com/articles/01149/evga-geforce-gtx-1080-ti-12ghz/

Source: EVGA

A splash of water can open it up; ASUS' ROG Poseidon GTX 1080 Ti Platinum

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 13, 2017 - 01:19 PM |
Tagged: ROG Poseidon GTX 1080 Ti Platinum, gtx 1080 ti, asus, water cooling, factory overclocked

We have seen the test results that ASUS' Poseidon GTX 1080 Ti can manage on air cooling and now it is time to revist the card when it is watercooled.  [H]ard|OCP attached the card to a Koolance Exos Liquid Cooling System Model EX2-755 and fired up the system to benchmark it.  The difference is immediately noticeable, the minimum clock on watercooling almost matches the highest clock seen on air cooling, with an average observed frequency of 2003MHz, 2076MHz once they manually overclocked.  This did translate into better gameplay and significantly lower operating temperatures which you can see in detail here.

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"It’s time to let the liquid flow and put the ASUS ROG Poseidon GTX 1080 Ti Platinum Edition to the ultimate test. We will connect a Koolance Liquid Cooling System and test GPU frequency, gaming performance, and push the video card as hard as possible for its best overclock. Let’s find out what a little liquid can do for a GTX 1080 Ti."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: AKiTiO

A long time coming

External video cards for laptops have long been a dream of many PC enthusiasts, and for good reason. It’s compelling to have a thin-and-light notebook with great battery life for things like meetings or class, with the ability to plug it into a dock at home and enjoy your favorite PC games.

Many times we have been promised that external GPUs for notebooks would be a viable option. Over the years there have been many commercial solutions involving both industry standard protocols like ExpressCard, as well as proprietary connections to allow you to externally connect PCIe devices. Inspiring hackers have also had their hand with this for many years, cobbling together interesting solutions using mPCIe and M.2 ports on their notebooks which were meant for other devices.

With the introduction of Intel’s Thunderbolt standard in 2011, there was a hope that we would finally achieve external graphics nirvana. A modern, Intel-backed protocol promising PCIe x4 speeds (PCIe 2.0 at that point) sounded like it would be ideal for connecting GPUs to notebooks, and in some ways it was. Once again the external graphics communities managed to get it to work through the use of enclosures meant to connect other non-GPU PCIe devices such as RAID and video capture cards to systems. However, software support was still a limiting factor. You were required to use an external monitor to display your video, and it still felt like you were just riding the line between usability and a total hack. It felt like we were never going to get true universal support for external GPUs on notebooks.

Then, seemingly of out of nowhere, Intel decided to promote native support for external GPUs as a priority when they introduced Thunderbolt 3. Fast forward, and we've already seen a much larger adoption of Thunderbolt 3 on PC notebooks than we ever did with the previous Thunderbolt implementations. Taking all of this into account, we figured it was time to finally dip our toes into the eGPU market. 

For our testing, we decided on the AKiTio Node for several reasons. First, at around $300, it's by far the lowest cost enclosure built to support GPUs. Additionally, it seems to be one of the most compatible devices currently on the market according to the very helpful comparison chart over at eGPU.io. The eGPU site is a wonderful resource for everything external GPU, over any interface possible, and I would highly recommend heading over there to do some reading if you are interested in trying out an eGPU for yourself.

The Node unit itself is a very utilitarian design. Essentially you get a folded sheet metal box with a Thunderbolt controller and 400W SFX power supply inside.

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In order to install a GPU into the Node, you must first unscrew the enclosure from the back and slide the outer shell off of the device.

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Once inside, we can see that there is ample room for any graphics card you might want to install in this enclosure. In fact, it seems a little too large for any of the GPUs we installed, including GTX 1080 Ti models. Here, you can see a more reasonable RX 570 installed.

Beyond opening up the enclosure to install a GPU, there is very little configuration required. My unit required a firmware update, but that was easily applied with the tools from the AKiTio site.

From here, I simply connected the Node to a ThinkPad X1, installed the NVIDIA drivers for our GTX 1080 Ti, and everything seemed to work — including using the 1080 Ti with the integrated notebook display and no external monitor!

Now that we've got the Node working, let's take a look at some performance numbers.

Continue reading our look at external graphics with the Thunderbolt 3 AKiTiO Node!

ASUS has created a new hybrid, the Poseidon GTX 1080 Ti Platinum Edition

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 29, 2017 - 01:33 PM |
Tagged: asus, ASUS ROG, gtx 1080 ti, Poseidon GTX 1080 Ti Platinum Edition, poseidon, DirectCU H20, factory overclocked

We've seen the ASUS ROG Poseidon before, the last one that comes to mind being the GTX 980 Ti from Computex 2015.  The name refers to the hybrid cooling solution which incorporates both watercooling and aircooling, giving you the option to add watercooling to increase your thermal dissipation or to remain with aircooling.  [H]ard|OCP is working on a two part review of the card, this first article covering the performance of the card on aircooling alone.  The card exceeded the quoted boost clock of 1708MHz, averaging 1939MHz in the BF1 test on default Gaming Mode clocks, 2025MHz once they overclocked.  That is an impressive clock but there are other air cooled cards which are able to reach higher frequencies so it will be interesting to see what adding watercooling to the card will do.

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"Air cooling? Liquid Cooling? How about both, the ASUS ROG Poseidon GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Platinum Edition hybrid video card can run them both. In Part 1 of our evaluation we will test the video card on "air cooling" and overclock it as high as possible. In Part 2, we pump liquid through its veins and compare overclocks."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP