Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A Beautiful Graphics Card

As a surprise to nearly everyone, on July 21st NVIDIA announced the existence of the new Titan X graphics cards, which are based on the brand new GP102 Pascal GPU. Though it shares a name, for some unexplained reason, with the Maxwell-based Titan X graphics card launched in March of 2015, this is card is a significant performance upgrade. Using the largest consumer-facing Pascal GPU to date (with only the GP100 used in the Tesla P100 exceeding it), the new Titan X is going to be a very expensive, and very fast gaming card.

As has been the case since the introduction of the Titan brand, NVIDIA claims that this card is for gamers that want the very best in graphics hardware as well as for developers and need an ultra-powerful GPGPU device. GP102 does not integrate improved FP64 / double precision compute cores, so we are basically looking at an upgraded and improved GP104 Pascal chip. That’s nothing to sneeze at, of course, and you can see in the specifications below that we expect (and can now show you) Titan X (Pascal) is a gaming monster.

  Titan X (Pascal) GTX 1080 GTX 980 Ti TITAN X GTX 980 R9 Fury X R9 Fury R9 Nano R9 390X
GPU GP102 GP104 GM200 GM200 GM204 Fiji XT Fiji Pro Fiji XT Hawaii XT
GPU Cores 3584 2560 2816 3072 2048 4096 3584 4096 2816
Rated Clock 1417 MHz 1607 MHz 1000 MHz 1000 MHz 1126 MHz 1050 MHz 1000 MHz up to 1000 MHz 1050 MHz
Texture Units 224 160 176 192 128 256 224 256 176
ROP Units 96 64 96 96 64 64 64 64 64
Memory 12GB 8GB 6GB 12GB 4GB 4GB 4GB 4GB 8GB
Memory Clock 10000 MHz 10000 MHz 7000 MHz 7000 MHz 7000 MHz 500 MHz 500 MHz 500 MHz 6000 MHz
Memory Interface 384-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 384-bit 384-bit 256-bit 4096-bit (HBM) 4096-bit (HBM) 4096-bit (HBM) 512-bit
Memory Bandwidth 480 GB/s 320 GB/s 336 GB/s 336 GB/s 224 GB/s 512 GB/s 512 GB/s 512 GB/s 320 GB/s
TDP 250 watts 180 watts 250 watts 250 watts 165 watts 275 watts 275 watts 175 watts 275 watts
Peak Compute 11.0 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 5.63 TFLOPS 6.14 TFLOPS 4.61 TFLOPS 8.60 TFLOPS 7.20 TFLOPS 8.19 TFLOPS 5.63 TFLOPS
Transistor Count 11.0B 7.2B 8.0B 8.0B 5.2B 8.9B 8.9B 8.9B 6.2B
Process Tech 16nm 16nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm
MSRP (current) $1,200 $599 $649 $999 $499 $649 $549 $499 $329

GP102 features 40% more CUDA cores than the GP104 at slightly lower clock speeds. The rated 11 TFLOPS of single precision compute of the new Titan X is 34% higher than that of the GeForce GTX 1080 and I would expect gaming performance to scale in line with that difference.

Titan X (Pascal) does not utilize the full GP102 GPU; the recently announced Pascal P6000 does, however, which gives it a CUDA core count of 3,840 (256 more than Titan X).


A full GP102 GPU

The complete GPU effectively loses 7% of its compute capability with the new Titan X, although that is likely to help increase available clock headroom and yield.

The new Titan X will feature 12GB of GDDR5X memory, not HBM as the GP100 chip has, so this is clearly a unique chip with a new memory interface. NVIDIA claims it has 480 GB/s of bandwidth on a 384-bit memory controller interface running at the same 10 Gbps as the GTX 1080.

Continue reading our review of the new NVIDIA Titan X (Pascal) Graphics Card!!

Frame Time Monday; this time with the GTX 1080

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 27, 2016 - 04:55 PM |
Tagged: pascal, nvidia, GTX 1080, gtx, GP104, geforce, founders edition

You have already seen our delve into the frame times provided by the GTX 1080 but perhaps you would like another opinion.  The Tech Report also uses the FCAT process which we depend upon to bring you frame time data, however they present the data in a slightly different way which might help you to comprehend the data.  They also included Crysis 3 to ensure that the card can indeed play it.  Check out their full review here.


"Nvidia's GeForce GTX 1080 is the company's first consumer graphics card to feature its new Pascal architecture, fabricated on a next-generation 16-nm process. We dig deep into the GTX 1080 to see what the confluence of these advances means for the high-end graphics market."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Teaser - GTX 1080's Tested in SLI - EVGA SC ACX 3.0

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 27, 2016 - 02:58 PM |
Tagged: sli, review, led, HB, gtx, evga, Bridge, ACX 3.0, 3dmark, 1080 the time where we manage to get multiple GTX 1080's in the office here would, of course, be when Ryan is on the other side of the planet. We are also missing some other semi-required items, like the new 'SLI HB 'bridge, but we should be able to test on an older LED bridge at 2560x1440 (under the resolution where the newer style is absolutely necessary to avoid a sub-optimal experience). That said, surely the storage guy can squeeze out a quick run of 3DMark to check out the SLI scaling, right?


For this testing, I spent just a few minutes with EVGA's OC Scanner to take advantage of GPU Boost 3.0. I cranked the power limits and fans on both cards, ending up at a stable overclock hovering at right around 2 GHz on the pair. I'm leaving out the details of the second GPU we got in for testing as it may be under NDA and I can't confirm that as all of the people to ask are in an opposite time zone, so I'm leaving out that for now (pfft - it has an aftermarket cooler). Then I simply ran Firestrike (25x14) with SLI disabled:


...and then with it enabled:


That works out to a 92% gain in 3DMark score, with the FPS figures jumping by almost exactly 2x. Now remember, this is by no means a controlled test, and the boss will be cranking out a much more detailed piece with frame rated results galore in the future, but for now I just wanted to get some quick figures out to the masses for consumption and confirmation that 1080 SLI is a doable thing, even on an older bridge.

*edit* here's another teaser:


Aftermarket coolers are a good thing as evidenced by the 47c of that second GPU, but the Founders Edition blower-style cooler is still able to get past 2GHz just fine. Both cards had their fans at max speed in this example.

*edit again*

I was able to confirm we are not under NDA on the additional card we received. Behold:



This is the EVGA Superclocked edition with their ACX 3.0 cooler.

More to follow (yes, again)!

Podcast #400 - Talking GTX 1080 Performance, GTX 1070 specs, AMD Polaris leaks and more!

Subject: General Tech | May 19, 2016 - 12:08 PM |
Tagged: video, radeon, polaris 11, polaris 10, Polaris, podcast, pascal, nvidia, GTX 1080, gtx 1070, gtx, geforce, arm, amd, 10nm

PC Perspective Podcast #400 - 05/19/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the GTX 1080 performance and features, official specifications of the GTX 1070, new Polaris specification rumors, ARM's 10nm chip test and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

NVIDIA Releases Full Specifications for GTX 1070

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 18, 2016 - 12:49 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, pascal, gtx 1070, 1070, gtx, GTX 1080, 16nm FF+, TSMC, Founder's Edition

Several weeks ago when NVIDIA announced the new GTX 1000 series of products, we were given a quick glimpse of the GTX 1070.  This upper-midrange card is to carry a $379 price tag in retail form while the "Founder's Edition" will hit the $449 mark.  Today NVIDIA released the full specifications of this card on their website.

The interest of the GTX 1070 is incredibly great because of the potential performance of this card vs. the previous generation.  Price is also a big consideration here as it is far easier to raise $370 than it is to make the jump to GTX 1080 and shell out $599 once non-Founder's Edition cards are released.  The GTX 1070 has all of the same features as the GTX 1080, but it takes a hit when it comes to clockspeed and shader units.


The GTX 1070 is a Pascal based part that is fabricated on TSMC's 16nm FF+ node.  It shares the same overall transistor count of the GTX 1080, but it is partially disabled.  The GTX 1070 contains 1920 CUDA cores as compared to the 2560 cores of the 1080.  Essentially one full GPC is disabled to reach that number.  The clockspeeds take a hit as well compared to the full GTX 1080.  The base clock for the 1070 is still an impressive 1506 MHz and boost reaches 1683 MHz.  This combination of shader counts and clockspeed makes this probably a little bit faster than the older GTX 980 ti.  The rated TDP for the card is 150 watts with a single 8 pin PCI-E power connector.  This means that there should be some decent headroom when it comes to overclocking this card.  Due to binning and yields, we may not see 2+ GHz overclocks with these cards, especially if NVIDIA cut down the power delivery system as compared to the GTX 1080.  Time will tell on that one.

The memory technology that NVIDIA is using for this card is not the cutting edge GDDR5x or HBM, but rather the tried and true GDDR5.  8 GB of this memory sits on a 256 bit bus, but it is running at a very, very fast 8 gbps.  This gives overall bandwidth in the 256 GB/sec region.  When we combine this figure with the memory compression techniques implemented with the Pascal architecture we can see that the GTX 1070 will not be bandwidth starved.  We have no information if this generation of products will mirror what we saw with the previous generation GTX 970 in terms of disabled memory controllers and the 3.5 GB/500 MB memory split due to that unique memory subsystem.


Beyond those things, the GTX 1070 is identical to the GTX 1080 in terms of DirectX features, display specifications, decoding support, double bandwidth SLI, etc.  There is an obvious amount of excitement for this card considering its potential performance and price point.  These supposedly will be available in the Founder's Edition release on June 10 for the $449 MSRP.  I know many people are considering using these cards in SLI to deliver performance for half the price of last year's GTX 980ti.  From all indications, these cards will be a signficant upgrade for anyone using GTX 970s in SLI.  With the greater access to monitors that hit 4K as well as Surround Gaming, this could be a solid purchase for anyone looking to step up their game in these scenarios.

Source: NVIDIA

The 1080 roundup, Pascal in all its glory

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 17, 2016 - 06:22 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, pascal, video, GTX 1080, gtx, GP104, geforce, founders edition

Yes that's right, if you felt Ryan and Al somehow missed something in our review of the new GTX 1080 or you felt the obvious pro-Matrox bios was showing here are the other reviews you can pick and choose from.  Start off with [H]ard|OCP who also tested Ashes of the Singularity and Doom as well as the old favourite Battlefield 4.  Doom really showed itself off as a next generation game, its Nightmare mode scoffing at any GPU with less than 5GB of VRAM available and pushing the single 1080 hard.  Read on to see how the competition stacked up ... or wait for the 1440 to come out some time in the future.


"NVIDIA's next generation video card is here, the GeForce GTX 1080 Founders Edition video card based on the new Pascal architecture will be explored. We will compare it against the GeForce GTX 980 Ti and Radeon R9 Fury X in many games to find out what it is capable of."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A new architecture with GP104

Table of Contents

The summer of change for GPUs has begun with today’s review of the GeForce GTX 1080. NVIDIA has endured leaks, speculation and criticism for months now, with enthusiasts calling out NVIDIA for not including HBM technology or for not having asynchronous compute capability. Last week NVIDIA’s CEO Jen-Hsun Huang went on stage and officially announced the GTX 1080 and GTX 1070 graphics cards with a healthy amount of information about their supposed performance and price points. Issues around cost and what exactly a Founders Edition is aside, the event was well received and clearly showed a performance and efficiency improvement that we were not expecting.


The question is, does the actual product live up to the hype? Can NVIDIA overcome some users’ negative view of the Founders Edition to create a product message that will get the wide range of PC gamers looking for an upgrade path an option they’ll take?

I’ll let you know through the course of this review, but what I can tell you definitively is that the GeForce GTX 1080 clearly sits alone at the top of the GPU world.

Continue reading our review of the GeForce GTX 1080 Founders Edition!!

PCPer Live! GeForce GTX 1080 Live Stream with Tom Petersen (Now with free cards!)

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | May 16, 2016 - 03:19 PM |
Tagged: video, tom petersen, pascal, nvidia, live, GTX 1080, gtx, GP104, geforce

Our review of the GeForce GTX 1080 is LIVE NOW, so be sure you check that out before today's live stream!!

Get yourself ready, it’s time for another GeForce GTX live stream hosted by PC Perspective’s Ryan Shrout and NVIDIA’s Tom Petersen. The general details about consumer Pascal and the GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card are already official and based on the traffic to our stories and the response on Twitter and YouTube, there is more than a little pent-up excitement. .


On hand to talk about the new graphics card, answer questions about technologies in the GeForce family including Pascal, SLI, VR, Simultaneous Multi-Projection and more will be Tom Petersen, well known in our community. We have done quite a few awesome live steams with Tom in the past, check them out if you haven't already.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Live Stream

10am PT / 1pm ET - May 17th

PC Perspective Live! Page

Need a reminder? Join our live mailing list!

The event will take place Tuesday, May 17th at 1pm ET / 10am PT at There you’ll be able to catch the live video stream as well as use our chat room to interact with the audience, asking questions for me and Tom to answer live. 

Tom has a history of being both informative and entertaining and these live streaming events are always full of fun and technical information that you can get literally nowhere else. Previous streams have produced news as well – including statements on support for Adaptive Sync, release dates for displays and first-ever demos of triple display G-Sync functionality. You never know what’s going to happen or what will be said!

UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE! This just in fellow gamers: Tom is going to be providing two GeForce GTX 1080 graphics cards to give away during the live stream! We won't be able to ship them until availability hits at the end of May, but two lucky viewers of the live stream will be able to get their paws on the fastest graphics card we have ever tested!! Make sure you are scheduled to be here on May 17th at 10am PT / 1pm ET!!


Don't you want to win me??!?

If you have questions, please leave them in the comments below and we'll look through them just before the start of the live stream. Of course you'll be able to tweet us questions @pcper and we'll be keeping an eye on the IRC chat as well for more inquiries. What do you want to know and hear from Tom or I?

So join us! Set your calendar for this coming Tuesday at 1pm ET / 10am PT and be here at PC Perspective to catch it. If you are a forgetful type of person, sign up for the PC Perspective Live mailing list that we use exclusively to notify users of upcoming live streaming events including these types of specials and our regular live podcast. I promise, no spam will be had!

Rumor: NVIDIA's Next GPU Called GTX 1080, Uses GDDR5X

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 11, 2016 - 05:03 PM |
Tagged: rumor, report, pascal, nvidia, HBM2, gtx1080, GTX 1080, gtx, GP104, geforce, gddr5x

We are expecting news of the next NVIDIA graphics card this spring, and as usual whenever an announcement is imminent we have started seeing some rumors about the next GeForce card.


(Image credit: NVIDIA)

Pascal is the name we've all being hearing about, and along with this next-gen core we've been expecting HBM2 (second-gen High Bandwidth Memory). This makes today's rumor all the more interesting, as VideoCardz is reporting (via BenchLife) that a card called either the GTX 1080 or GTX 1800 will be announced, using the GP104 GPU core with 8GB of GDDR5X - and not HBM2.

The report also claims that NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang will have an announcement for Pascal in April, which leads us to believe a shipping product based on Pascal is finally in the works. Taking in all of the information from the BenchLife report, VideoCardz has created this list to summarize the rumors (taken directly from the source link):

  • Pascal launch in April
  • GTX 1080/1800 launch in May 27th
  • GTX 1080/1800 has GP104 Pascal GPU
  • GTX 1080/1800 has 8GB GDDR5X memory
  • GTX 1080/1800 has one 8pin power connector
  • GTX 1080/1800 has 1x DVI, 1x HDMI, 2x DisplayPort
  • First Pascal board with HBM would be GP100 (Big Pascal)


Rumored GTX 1080 Specs (Credit: VideoCardz)

The alleged single 8-pin power connector with this GTX 1080 would place the power limit at 225W, though it could very well require less power. The GTX 980 is only a 165W part, with the GTX 980 Ti rated at 250W.

As always, only time will tell how accurate these rumors are; though VideoCardz points out "BenchLife stories are usually correct", though they are skeptical of the report based on the name GTX 1080 (though this would follow the current naming scheme of GeForce cards).

Source: VideoCardz

IFA 2015: Lenovo Introduces New ideapad Notebook Lineup

Subject: Systems, Mobile | September 2, 2015 - 03:00 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, notebooks, Lenovo, laptops, Intel Skylake, Intel Braswell, IFA 2015, ideapad 500S, ideapad 300S, ideapad 100S, Ideapad, gtx, APU, amd


Lenovo has unveiled their reinvented their ideapad (now all lowercase) lineup at IFA 2015 in Berlin, and the new laptops feature updated processors including Intel Braswell and Skylake, as well as some discrete AMD and NVIDIA GPU options.


At the entry-level price-point we find the ideapad 100S which does not contain one of the new Intel chips, instead running an Intel Atom Z3735F CPU and priced accordingly at just $189 for the 11.6” version and $259 for the 14” model. While low-end specs (2GB RAM, 32GB/64GB eMMC storage, 1366x768 screen) aren’t going to blow anyone away, these at least provide a Windows 10 alternative to a Chromebook at about the same cost, and to add some style Lenovo is offering the laptop in four colors: blue, red, white, and silver.


Moving up to the 300S we find a 14” laptop (offered in red, black, or white) with Intel Pentium Braswell processors up to the quad-core N3700, and the option of a FHD 1920x1080 display. Memory and storage options will range up to 8GB DDR3L and up to either 256GB SSD or 1TB HDD/SSHD. At 0.86" thick the 300S weighs 2.9 lbs, and prices will start at $479.

A lower-cost ideapad 300, without the “S” and with more basic styling, will be available in sizes ranging from 14” to 17” and prices starting between $399 and $549 for their respective models. A major distinction will be the inclusion of both Braswell and Intel 6th Gen Skylake CPUs, as well at the option of a discrete AMD GPU (R5 330M). 


Last we have the ideapad 500S, available in 13.3”, 14”, and 15.6” versions. With Intel 6th Gen processors up to Core i7 like the 300S, these also offer optional NVIDIA GPUs (GTX 920M for the 13.3", 940M for the 14"+) and up to FHD screen resolution. Memory and storage options range up to 8GB DDR3L and up to either 256GB SSD or 1TB HDD/SSHD, and the 500S is a bit thinner and lighter than the 300S, with the 13.3” version 0.76” thick and 3.4 lbs, moving up to 0.81” and 4.6 lbs with the 15.6” version.

A non-S version of the ideapad 500 will also be available, and this will be the sole AMD CPU representative with the option of an all-AMD solution powered by up to the A10-7300 APU, or a combination of R7 350M graphics along with 6th Gen Intel Core processors. 14” and 15” models will be available starting at $399 for the APU model and $499 with an Intel CPU.

All of the new laptops ship with Windows 10 as Microsoft’s newest OS arrived just in time for the back-to-school season.

Source: Lenovo