Zotac steps up their Zbox game

Subject: Systems | October 3, 2017 - 05:42 PM |
Tagged: zotac, zbox, Magnus EN1080K, GeForce GTX 1080, i7-7700, SFF, water cooler

The newest Zbox from Zotac is also the most powerful one they have made, which does make it a bit of a different beast than other Zotac SFF products.  With an i7-7700 paired with a GTX 1080, along with 16GB of DDR4-2400 and a WD Black 512GB NVMe M.2 SSD the Magnus offers more power than you find in many a mid-range system.  The heat produced in the tight confines of the system, 8.9x8x5" (23 x 20 x 13cm), is handled by a custom built watercooling system which cools both the CPU and GPU.  This does make the system significantly larger than previous Zbox products and it is much more power hungry, with two power adapters required to run it.  The Tech Report loved the performance but did encounter some significant issues with the Zbox, which they overcame with quick and effective support from Zotac.  Check this one out for the impressive build design as well as it's impressive gaming abilities.

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"Zotac's Zbox Magnus EN1080K pairs Intel's Core i7-7700 CPU with a GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card in an impressively dense liquid-cooled package. We ran some of our favorite games on this system to see how it stacks up in the small-form-factor pantheon."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

 

The cutest little GTX 1080 you'll see; Gigabyte's GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 1, 2017 - 05:52 PM |
Tagged: GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G, gigabyte, GeForce GTX 1080

Gigabyte have shrunk the GTX 1080 into a tiny little package 17cm long, retaining the dual slot design to ensure you still have the connectivity options you expect.

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Even with its small stature and 90mm fan, the card is no slowpoke.  Setting it to Gaming Mode gives the standard 1733/1607MHZ Boost/BAse and there is an OC mode which will raise those clocks to 1771/1632MHz.

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There is no stock at the moment, which is also true the GTX 1070 and 1060 models which have already been released.  Those two are not sold at a large premium over their bigger twins so once prices have descended from the stratosphere and supply begins to accumulate again the tiny 1080 shouldn't carry a large premium.

 

Source: Gigabyte

NVIDIA Limits GTX 1080 SLI to Two Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 11, 2016 - 10:57 PM |
Tagged: sli, nvidia, GTX 1080, GeForce GTX 1080

Update (May 12th, 1:45am): Okay so the post has been deleted, which was originally from Chris Bencivenga, Support Manager at EVGA. A screenshot of it is attached below. Note that Jacob Freeman later posted that "More info about SLI support will be coming soon, please stay tuned." I guess this means take the news with a grain of salt until an official word can be released.

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Original Post Below

According to EVGA, NVIDIA will not support three- and four-way SLI on the GeForce GTX 1080. They state that, even if you use the old, multi-way connectors, it will still be limited to two-way. The new SLI connector (called SLI HB) will provide better performance “than 2-way SLI did in the past on previous series”. This suggests that the old SLI connectors can be used with the GTX 1080, although with less performance and only for two cards.

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This is the only hard information that we have on this change, but I will elaborate a bit based on what I know about graphics APIs. Basically, SLI (and CrossFire) are simplifications of the multi-GPU load-balancing problems such that it is easy to do from within the driver, without the game's involvement. In DirectX 11 and earlier, the game cannot interface with the driver in that way at all. That does not apply to DirectX 12 and Vulkan, however. In those APIs, you will be able to explicitly load-balance by querying all graphics devices (including APUs) and split the commands yourself.

Even though a few DirectX 12 games exist, it's still unclear how SLI and CrossFire will be utilized in the context of DirectX 12 and Vulkan. DirectX 12 has the tier of multi-GPU called “implicit multi-adapter,” which allows the driver to load balance. How will this decision affect those APIs? Could inter-card bandwidth even be offloaded via SLI HB in DirectX 12 and Vulkan at all? Not sure yet (but you would think that they would at least add a Vulkan extension). You should be able to use three GTX 1080s in titles that manually load-balance to three or more mismatched GPUs, but only for those games.

If it relies upon SLI, which is everything DirectX 11, then you cannot. You definitely cannot.

Source: EVGA

Galax GeForce GTX 1080 Pictured with Custom Cooler

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 10, 2016 - 04:06 PM |
Tagged: video card, reference cooler, pascal, nvidia, GTX 1080, graphics card, GeForce GTX 1080, Founder's Edition

The first non-reference GTX 1080 has been revealed courtesy of Galax, and the images (via VideoCardz.com) look a lot different than the Founder's Edition.

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Galax GTX 1080 (Image Credit: VideoCardz)

The Galax is the first custom implementation of the GTX 1080 we've seen, and as such the first example of a $599 variant of the GTX 1080. The Founder's Edition cards carry a $100 premium (and offer that really nice industrial design) but ultimately it's about performance and the Galax card will presumably offer completely stock specifications.

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(Image Credit: VideoCardz)

Expect to see a deluge of aftermarket cooling from EVGA, ASUS, MSI, and others soon enough - most of which will presumably be using a dual or triple-fan cooler, and not a simple blower like this.

Source: VideoCardz