Recalculating ... time to arrival infinite minutes

Subject: General Tech | February 13, 2019 - 01:12 PM |
Tagged: gps, 10 bit, Future, oh no

You might have missed something in 1999, while everyone focused on the other Y2K bug, which was older GPS devices going haywire.  This was because the date is stored as a 10 bit character which means that 1024 weeks after the start of the epoch, the dates on your GPS device rolls back to 0 and it is no longer able to give positional data as it depends on knowing when, as well as where you are.

On April 6th, this will happen once again and far more people are bound to notice than when this previously occurred.  There are ways to ensure that devices do not suffer this bothersome 10 bit problem but with the lack of news coverage and general awareness not many have bothered.  Devices which adhere to the ICD-200/IS-GPS-200 specification will have no problems whatsoever; but many devices did not originally and when was the last time you saw a firmware update for the GPS in your car?

As The Register puts it, "if your gadget goes haywire in April, it's probably because of this. If it works as normal: brilliant, it's not affected."

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"Older satnavs and such devices won't be able to use America's Global Positioning System properly after April 6 unless they've been suitably updated or designed to handle a looming epoch rollover."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register
Subject: Editorial, Storage
Manufacturer: Various
Tagged: ssd, Future, flash, Bleak, 2012

Overcoming Hurdles

A paper, titled “The Bleak Future of NAND Flash Memory” was recently jointly published by the University of California and Microsoft Research. It has been picked up by many media outlets who all seem to be beating the same morbid drum, spinning tales of a seemingly apocalyptic end to the reign of flash-based storage devices. While I agree with some of what these authors have to say, I have reservations about the methods upon which the paper is based.

TLC and beyond?

The paper kicks off by declaring steep increases in latency and drops in lifetime associated with increases in bits-per-cell. While this is true, flash memory manufacturers are not making large pushes to increase bits-per-cell beyond the standard MLC (2 bits per cell) tech. Sure some have dabbled in 3-bit MLC, also called Triple Level Cell (TLC) which is a bit of a misnomer since storing three bits in a cell actually requires eight voltage level bands, not three as the name implies. Moving from SLC to MLC doubles density, but the diminishing returns increase sharply after that – MLC to TLC only increases capacity by a another 1.5x, but sees a 2-4x reduction in performance and endurance. In light of this, there is little demand for TLC flash, and where there is, it’s clear by the usage cases that it is not meant for anything beyond light usage. There's nothing wrong with the paper going down this road, but the reality is that increasing bits per cell is not the envelope being pushed by the flash memory industry.

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Wait a second – where is 25nm MLC?

Looking at the above we see a glaring omission – 25nm MLC flash, which has been around for close to two years now, and constitutes the majority of shipping flash memory parts currently in production. SLC was also omitted, but I can see the reason for this – it’s hard to get your hands on 25nm SLC these days. Why? Because MLC technology has been improved upon to the point where ‘enterprise MLC’ (eMLC) is rapidly replacing SLC even despite the supposed reduction in reliability and endurance over SLC. The reasons for this are simple, and are completely sidestepped or otherwise overlooked by the paper:

  • SSD controllers employ write combination and wear leveling techniques.
  • Some controllers even compress data on-the-fly as to further reduce writes and provisioning.
  • Controller-level Error Correction (ECC) has improved dramatically with each process shrink.
  • SSD controllers can be programmed to compensate for the drift of data stored in a cell (eMLC).

Continue reading our editorial on the not-so-bleak future of NAND Flash Memory!!!