Every single Freesync ... G-SYNC in a box

Subject: Displays | April 2, 2019 - 06:24 PM |
Tagged: freesync, adaptive sync, g-sync, 32GK850F, LG, 24GL600F, 27GK750F, 32GK650F, 34GK950Fand found to b

When TechSpot tested G-SYNC monitors for compatibility they had great success, indeed any issues they found they decided were more likely issues with the display as opposed to compatibility issues.  LG noticed that they didn't test any of their displays and so they sent over a few for review, which TechSpot happily accepted.  The 32GK850F, 24GL600F, 27GK750F, 32GK650F and 34GK950F were all tested and found to be fully compatible, if you happen to have one.

If you are not familiar with that third model, it is a rare 27" 1080p TN display with a top refresh rate of 240Hz, maybe not the prettiest but certainly one of the fastest 27 inchers around. 

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"Earlier this year we first put Nvidia's support for FreeSync monitors to the test, grabbed every FreeSync monitor we had in the office, and verified that in all cases adaptive sync worked as expected. LG recently sent us 5 of their latest FreeSync monitors, which we've used to revisit Nvidia's FreeSync support."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: TechSpot

$750 Pre-orders for LG 32UL750-W FreeSync HDR 600 Display

Subject: Displays | February 11, 2019 - 07:30 PM |
Tagged: LG, hdr 600, hdr, freesync

LG is preparing to release the 32UL750-W 31.5-inch FreeSync gaming monitor.

This one is certified for VESA DisplayHDR 600, which requires a minimum of 600 cd/m2 in both small patches for highlights (at least 10% of the screen) as well as full-screen for brief periods to convey the sharp brightness during scenes of explosions. The panel also must produce 350 cd/m2 across the whole panel for long periods of time. It is VESA’s second-highest DisplayHDR certification behind DisplayHDR 1000 (excluding the True Black variants, which add low-brightness performance to the criteria).

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In terms of its other features: it is built around a VA panel that has a 4K (3840 x 2160) native resolution. The monitor can accept inputs over 2x HDMI, DisplayPort, or USB-C. Its color gamut is listed as 95% DCI-P3. It is only capable of a 60Hz refresh rate, which may or may not be something that people care about. Personally, I value higher refresh rates, although that’s mostly for typical 2D things, like moving my mouse and simple UI animations. Above 60 FPS is less noticeable for me in busy scenes, like most first-person shooters, although it does add a bit to the experience.

The LG 32UL750-W is currently on pre-order for an MSRP of $749.99. B&H Photo has it listed for $746.99. As far as I know, neither LG nor B&H Photo lists when these pre-orders will ship. Anandtech says that the monitor is already shipping in Japan, however.

Source: LG

Independent G-SYNC Compatibility Testing Begins at Rtings

Subject: Displays | January 21, 2019 - 05:37 PM |
Tagged: vrr, variable refresh rate, rtings, nvidia, monitor, g-sync compatible, g-sync, freesync, display, amd

The staff of Rtings has embarked upon their own in-house testing of G-SYNC compatibility with FreeSync monitors (introduced with GeForce driver 417.71), and have released a video to introduce this new project:

While their choice of NVIDIA's Pendulum demo might be up for debate (since let's face it, any time NVIDIA anything is used to test, well, anything, there will always be a conspiracy theory) they have made some noteworthy observations about their experience vs. an AMD FX 580 with the same monitors. Still, as they point out in the article, "This test is by no means exhaustive, and your results may vary depending on the specific games you are playing, and your specific graphics card."

From RTings:

"We test FreeSync on a custom built PC, with an NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB. Each monitor is connected via DisplayPort, as NVIDIA's FreeSync implementation does not currently work over HDMI. We use NVIDIA's Pendulum G-SYNC demo to test for tearing, stuttering, screen blanking, and other artifacts. We start at the monitor's standard refresh rate, and gradually decrease the sliders until we could see any issues. From there, we gradually increase the sliders until we start seeing tearing or other issues. The results of both of these tests give us the effective variable refresh rate range. We repeat the test at least twice to confirm our findings.

We use the results of this test to subjectively assign a result, based on how well the monitor supports NVIDIA's FreeSync implementation. The possible results are:

  • Yes, NVIDIA Certified: This is reserved for monitors that are certified by NVIDIA as being compatible with NVIDIA FreeSync.
  • Yes, Native: This is used to differentiate between monitors that support NVIDIA G-SYNC, instead of NVIDIA FreeSync.
  • Yes: These monitors are confirmed by us to support FreeSync with no major issues, but are not certified by NVIDIA.
  • Partial: These monitors at least partially support FreeSync, but we experienced some issues during testing. See the review for details of these issues.
  • No: These monitors either do not support FreeSync at all, or are unusable with FreeSync enabled."

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There are currently 25 test results available to help out with your variable refresh-rate monitor selections for use on NVIDIA hardware.

Source: Rtings

PC Perspective Podcast #529 - HyperX Cloud MIX, G-SYNC Compatible Monitors

Subject: General Tech | January 17, 2019 - 07:02 AM |
Tagged: video, Threadripper, podcast, Optane, micron, Intel, hyperx, g-sync compatibility, g-sync, freesync, cortana, 3dmark

PC Perspective Podcast #529 - 1/16/2019

This week on the show, we look at a review of a new wireless gaming headset from HyperX, talk about the new G-SYNC Compatibility program for FreeSync monitors, look at ray tracing performance in the new 3DMark Port Royal benchmark, and more!

Subscribe to the PC Perspective Podcast

Check out previous podcast episodes: http://pcper.com/podcast

Show Topics
01:34 - Review: HyperX Cloud MIX
05:19 - News: G-SYNC Compatible Monitor Driver
13:38 - News: Threadripper NUMA Dissociater
15:47 - News: HardOCP Interview with AMD's Scott Herkelman
21:35 - News: Intel-Micron 3D XPoint Split
24:34 - News: Cortana & Windows 10 Search
29:38 - News: 3DMark Port Royal Ray Tracing Benchmark
35:53 - Picks of the Week
46:24 - Outro

Sponsor: This week's episode is brought to you by Casper. Save $50 on select mattresses by visiting http://www.casper.com/pcper and using promo code pcper at checkout.

Picks of the Week
Jim: iPhone XS Max Battery Case
Jeremy: 3D-Printed Resistor Storage
Josh: ASRock X470 Taichi Motherboard
Sebastian: Koss KPH30ik Headphones

Today's Podcast Hosts
Sebastian Peak
Josh Walrath
Jeremy Hellstrom
Jim Tanous

GeForce Driver 417.71 Now Available, Enables G-SYNC Compatibility With FreeSync Monitors

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 15, 2019 - 03:25 AM |
Tagged: variable refresh rate, nvidia, graphics driver, gpu, geforce, g-sync compatibility, g-sync, freesync

One of NVIDIA's biggest and most surprising CES announcements was the introduction of support for "G-SYNC Compatible Monitors," allowing the company's G-SYNC-capable Pascal and Turing-based graphics cards to work with FreeSync and other non-G-SYNC variable refresh rate displays. NVIDIA is initially certifying 12 FreeSync monitors but will allow users of any VRR display to manually enable G-SYNC and determine for themselves if the quality of the experience is acceptable.

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Those eager to try the feature can now do so via NVIDIA's latest driver, version 417.71, which is rolling out worldwide right now. As of the date of this article's publication, users in the United States who visit NVIDIA's driver download page are still seeing the previous driver (417.35), but direct download links are already up and running.

The current list of FreeSync monitors that are certified by NVIDIA:

Users with a certified G-SYNC compatible monitor will have G-SYNC automatically enabled via the NVIDIA Control Panel when the driver is updated and the display is connected, the same process as connecting an official G-SYNC display. Those with a variable refresh rate display that is not certified must manually open the NVIDIA Control Panel and enable G-SYNC.

NVIDIA notes, however, that enabling the feature on displays that don't meet the company's performance capabilities may lead to a range of issues, from blurring and stuttering to flickering and blanking. The good news is that the type and severity of the issues will vary by display, so users can determine for themselves if the potential problems are acceptable.

Update: Users over at the NVIDIA subreddit have created a public Google Sheet to track their reports and experiences with various FreeSync monitors. Check it out to see how others are faring with your preferred monitor.

Update 2: Our friends over at Wccftech have published a short video demonstrating how to enable G-SYNC on non-G-SYNC VRR monitors:

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA adapts to the market and frees their displays

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2019 - 01:47 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, g-sync, freesync, benq, asus, AOC, amd, adaptive sync, acer

G-SYNC is showing some signs of defeat as today NVIDIA announced that several Adaptive Sync monitors have been tested and rated as G-SYNC compatible.  Adaptive Sync is the official VESA technology which is present in AMD's FreeSync monitors and it offers a definitive financial advantage over NVIDIA's G-SYNC as the module required for G-SYNC can add hundreds of dollars to the price.

So far only a dozen monitors out of around 400 tests have been rated as G-SYNC compatible, so don't expect to be mixing your monitors quite yet but it does imply in some cases the extra controller is not required for variable refresh rates with either NVIDIA's or AMD's GPUs.   The results of this test give AMD bragging rights for implementing adaptive sync in the most attractive way but this change could hurt GPU sales as users can now opt for an GeForce card paired with a FreeSync display.

Even if your display is not listed in those models, you can try enabling adaptive sync over DisplayPort and see if it works, though your results may vary. Ars Technica lists the models here.

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"Besides being unexpected good news for gamers who already own one of these FreeSync monitors, this is also great news for gamers that want to add VRR to their Nvidia graphics card setup without breaking the bank."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

A FreeSync G-Master G3266HS-B1 monitor, a sight for sore eyes

Subject: Displays | August 31, 2018 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: Iiyama, Iiyam, G-Master G3266HS-B1, freesync, 32in, 1800R, 144hz, 1080p

The G-MASTER G3266HS-B1 from Iiyama may not appeal to young gamers but for those who's eyes have seen better days, a 32" 1080p display is a decent size, and it includes a peak 144Hz refresh rate and FreeSync.  The 1800R curve may not appeal to some, especially if they were planning to use this from a fair distance away but it is a feature many look for.  Check out what Kitguru thought of this inexpensive, extra large sized, HD display in their full review.

Iiyama-G3266HS-B1-Monitor-Review-on-KitGuru-Front-Off.jpg

"However, Iiyama offers a nice selection of gaming-oriented monitors that are a bit easier on the wallet, and we’re looking at the largest of these, the 32in G-MASTER G3266HS-B1. Will it turn out to be a bit of a banger or a Ferrari lite?"

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Source: Kitguru

Podcast #511 - IFA 2018, StoreMI, and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 30, 2018 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: podcast, xps13, StoreMI, Samsung, radeon pro, nvidia, Intel, ifa 2018, freesync, Azulle, amd, acer

PC Perspective Podcast #511 - 08/30/18

Join us this week for discussion on IFA 2018, StoreMI, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:24:43

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
    1. IFA 2018
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:27:09 Jeremy: NordVPN deal
    2. 1:29:00 Josh: 3 free games!
    3. 1:33:25 Alex: http://paletton.com/
  4. Closing/outro
 
 
Source:

Acer shows off their stuff at IFA in Berlin

Subject: Shows and Expos | August 29, 2018 - 02:27 PM |
Tagged: Swift 5, Predator XB273K, OJO 500, Nitro XV273K, g-sync, freesync, aspire, acer

Acer announced a variety of new products at IFA, from monitors to laptops by way of a gaming throne. First up are a pair of monitors, the G-Sync Predator XB273K and FreeSync Nitro XV273K and two other models.  The 4k IPS Predator sports an impressive 144Hz top refresh rate, with a variety of Acer VisionCare features to reduce eyestrain.

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The Nitro series support FreeSync, and come in three models, a 4k IPS display and two 2560×1440 models, one IPS and one TN.  All three monitors can match the 144Hz top refresh rate of the Predator.  Purists will be a little disappointed that all four of these monitors were designed to the VESA DisplayHDR 400 standard.

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A wide variety of laptops were revealed, including the Swift 5 which is the lightest 15" laptop on the market.  The magnesium-lithium alloy construction of the body keeps the weight to 990g (2.2lbs), which is lighter than most high end CPU heatsinks.  Inside you can choose from a i7-8565U or Core
i5-8265U, up to 16GB DDR4 and an NVMe SSD.

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Their Aspire lineup has been updated with the Aspire 7 series featuring the Intel i7-8705G or or i5-8305G processor both of which have AMD's Radeon RX Vega M GL graphics onboard.  The Aspire 5 will offer a choice of 8th gen Amber Lake-Y or Whiskey Lake-U chips paired with NVIDIA's GeForce MX150 GP while the Aspire 3 line will offer a low cost laptop for students, with the choice to include an optical drive.

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If you are looking for an all-in-one, the Aspire Z 24 is a impressive implementation of that form factor.  Hidden behind the 1080p 10 point touchscreen is a Whiskey Lake-U processor paired with a GeForce MX15 and even support for up to 32GB of Optane memory.  It is designed to be controllable from up to 4 metres away, offering more than just a small footprint on a work desk.

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Last but not least is the OJO 500 Mixed Reality headset.  The two screens combine to offer a 100 degree FOV at a 2880 x 1440 resolution with up to a 90Hz refresh rate.  Acer chose to include small speakers in the headset as opposed to integrated headphones, in keeping with the mixed reality nature of the headset. The headset and two Bluetooth controllers will sell for $399US and will be compatible with Steam as well as Windows 10.

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This is a Thronos, in which a Predator desktop PC and three screens can prevent any chance of human interaction.

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Source: Acer
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

Your Mileage May Vary

One of the most interesting things going around in the computer hardware communities this past weekend was the revelation from a user named bryf50 on Reddit that they somehow had gotten his FreeSync display working with his NVIDIA GeForce GPU. 

For those of you that might not be familiar with the particular ins-and-outs of these variable refresh technologies, getting FreeSync displays to work on NVIDIA GPUs is potentially a very big deal.

While NVIDIA GPUs support the NVIDIA G-SYNC variable refresh rate standard, they are not compatible with Adaptive Sync (the technology on which FreeSync is based) displays. Despite Adaptive Sync being an open standard, and an optional extension to the DisplayPort specification, NVIDIA so far has chosen not to support these displays.

However, this provides some major downsides to consumers looking to purchase displays and graphics cards. Due to the lack of interoperability, consumers can get locked into a GPU vendor if they want to continue to use the variable refresh functionality of their display. Plus, Adaptive-Sync/FreeSync monitors, in general, seem to be significantly more inexpensive for similar specifications.

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Click here to continue reading our exploration into FreeSync support on NVIDIA GPUs!