Manufacturer: PC Perspective

AMD and NVIDIA GPUs Tested

Tom Clancy’s The Division 2 launched over the weekend and we've been testing it out over the past couple of days with a collection of currently-available graphics cards. Of interest to AMD fans, this game joins the ranks of those well optimized for Radeon graphics, and with a new driver (Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.3.2) released over the weekend it was a good time to run some benchmarks and see how some AMD and NVIDIA hardware stack up.

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The Division 2 offers DirectX 11 and 12 support, and uses Ubisoft's Snowdrop engine to provide some impressive visuals, particularly at the highest detail settings. We found the "ultra" preset to be quite attainable with very playable frame rates from most midrange-and-above hardware even at 2560x1440, though bear in mind that this game uses quite a bit of video memory. We hit a performance ceiling at 4GB with the "ultra" preset even at 1080p, so we opted for 6GB+ graphics cards for our final testing. And while most of our testing was done at 1440p we did test a selection of cards at 1080p and 4K, just to provide a look at how the GPUs on test scaled when facing different workloads.

Tom Clancy's The Division 2

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Washington D.C. is on the brink of collapse. Lawlessness and instability threaten our society, and rumors of a coup in the capitol are only amplifying the chaos. All active Division agents are desperately needed to save the city before it's too late.

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Developed by Ubisoft Massive and the same teams that brought you Tom Clancy’s The Division, Tom Clancy’s The Division 2 is an online open world, action shooter RPG experience set in a collapsing and fractured Washington, D.C. This rich new setting combines a wide variety of beautiful, iconic, and realistic environments where the player will experience the series’ trademark for authenticity in world building, rich RPG systems, and fast-paced action like never before.

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Play solo or co-op with a team of up to four players to complete a wide range of activities, from the main campaign and adversarial PvP matches to the Dark Zone – where anything can happen.

Continue reading our preview of GPU performance with The Division 2

NVIDIA Explains How Higher Frame Rates Can Give You an Edge in Battle Royale Games

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 7, 2019 - 11:07 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, gaming, fps, battle royale

NVIDIA has published an article about GPU performance and its impact on gaming, specifically the ultra-popular battle royale variety. The emphasis is on latency, and reducing this when gaming with a combination of high FPS numbers and a 144 Hz (and higher) refresh display. Many of these concepts may seem obvious (competitive gaming on CRTs and/or lower resolutions for max performance comes to mind), but there are plenty of slides to look over - with many more over at NVIDIA's post.

"For many years, esports pros have tuned their hardware for ultra-high frame rates -- 144 or even 240 FPS -- and they pair their hardware with high refresh rate monitors. In fact, ProSettings.net and ProSettings.com report that 99% of Battle Royale Pros (Fortnite,PUBG and Apex Legends) are using 144 Hz monitors or above, and 30% are using 240 Hz monitors. This is because when you run a game, an intricate process occurs in your PC from the time you press the keyboard or move the mouse, to the time you see an updated frame on the screen. They refer to this time period as ‘latency’, and the lower your latency the better your response times will be."

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While a GTX 750 Ti to RTX 2080 comparison defies explanation, latency obviously drops with performance in this example

"Working with pros through NVIDIA’s research team and Esports Studio, we have seen the benefits of high FPS and refresh rates play out in directed aiming and perception tests. In blind A/B tests, pros in our labs have been able to consistently discern and see benefits from even a handful of milliseconds of reduced latency.

But what does higher frame rates and lower latency mean for your competitiveness in Battle Royale? A few things:

  • Higher FPS means that you see the next frame more quickly and can respond to it
  • Higher FPS on a high Hz monitor makes the image appear smoother, and moving targets easier to aim at. You are also less likely to see microstutters or “skip pixels” from one frame to the next as you pan your crosshair across the screen
  • Higher FPS combined with G-SYNC technologies like Ultra Low Motion Blur (ULMB) makes objects and text sharper and easier to comprehend in fast moving scenes

This is why for Battle Royale games, which rely heavily on reaction times and your ability to spot an enemy quickly, you want to play at 144 FPS or more."

One of the more interesting aspects of this article relates to K/D ratios, with NVIDIA claiming an edge in this are based on GPU performance and monitor refresh rate:

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"We were curious to understand how hardware and frame rates affect overall competitiveness in Battle Royale games for everyday gamers - while better hardware can’t replace practice and training, it should assist gamers in getting closer to their maximum potential."

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"One of the common metrics of player performance in Battle Royales is kill-to-death (K/D) ratio -- how many times you killed another player divided by how many times another player killed you. Using anonymized GeForce Experience Highlights data on K/D events for PUBG and Fortnite, we found some interesting insights on player performance and wanted to share this information with the community."

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For more on this topic, and many more charts, check out the article over at NVIDIA.com.

Source: NVIDIA

Q2VKPT Makes Quake 2 the First Entirely Raytraced Game

Subject: General Tech | January 18, 2019 - 06:09 PM |
Tagged: vulkan, rtx, raytracing, Quake II, quake, Q2VKPT, Q2PRO, path tracing, open source, nvidia, john carmack, github, fps

Wait - the first fully raytraced game was released in 1997? Not exactly, but Q2VKPT is. That name is not a typo (it stands for Quake 2 Vulkan Path Tracing) it's actually a game - or, more correctly, a proof-of-concept. But not just any game; we're talking about Quake 2. Technically this is a combination of Q2PRO, "an enhanced Quake 2 client and server for Windows and Linux", and VKPT, or Vulkan Path Tracing.

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The end result is a fully raytraced experience that, if nothing else, gives the computer hardware media more to run on NVIDIA's GeForce RTX graphics cards right now than the endless BFV demos. Who would have guessed we'd be benchmarking Quake 2 again in 2019?

"Q2VKPT is the first playable game that is entirely raytraced and efficiently simulates fully dynamic lighting in real-time, with the same modern techniques as used in the movie industry (see Disney's practical guide to path tracing). The recent release of GPUs with raytracing capabilities has opened up entirely new possibilities for the future of game graphics, yet making good use of raytracing is non-trivial. While some games have started to explore improvements in shadow and reflection rendering, Q2VKPT is the first project to implement an efficient unified solution for all types of light transport: direct, scattered, and reflected light (see media). This kind of unification has led to a dramatic increase in both flexibility and productivity in the movie industry. The chance to have the same development in games promises a similar increase in visual fidelity and realism for game graphics in the coming years.

This project is meant to serve as a proof-of-concept for computer graphics research and the game industry alike, and to give enthusiasts a glimpse into the potential future of game graphics. Besides the use of hardware-accelerated raytracing, Q2VKPT mainly gains its efficiency from an adaptive image filtering technique that intelligently tracks changes in the scene illumination to re-use as much information as possible from previous computations."

The project can be downloaded from Github, and the developers neatly listed the needed files for download (the .pak files from either the Quake 2 demo or the full version can be used):

  • Github Repository
  • Windows Binary on Github
  • Quake II Starter ("Quake II Starter is a free, standalone Quake II installer for Windows that uses the freely available 3.14 demo, 3.20 point release and the multiplayer-focused Q2PRO client to create a functional setup that's capable of playing online.")

There were also a full Q&A from the developers, and some obvious questions were answered including the observation that Quake 2 is "ancient" at this point, and shouldn't it "run at 6000 FPS by now":

While it is true that Quake II is a relatively old game with rather low geometric complexity, the limiting factor of path tracing is not primarily raytracing or geometric complexity. In fact, the current prototype could trace many more rays without a notable change in frame rate. The computational cost of the techniques used in the Q2VKPT prototype mainly depend on the number of (indirect) light scattering computations and the number of light sources. Quake II was already designed with many light sources when it was first released, in that sense it is still quite a modern game. Also, the number of light scattering events does not depend on scene complexity. It is therefore thinkable that the techniques we use could well scale up to more recent games."

And on the subject of path tracing vs. ray tracing:

"Path tracing is an elegant algorithm that can simulate many of the complex ways that light travels and scatters in virtual scenes. Its physically-based simulation of light allows highly realistic rendering. Path tracing uses Raytracing in order to determine the visibility in-between scattering events. However, Raytracing is merely a primitive operation that can be used for many things. Therefore, Raytracing alone does not automatically produce realistic images. Light transport algorithms like Path tracing can be used for that. However, while elegant and very powerful, naive path tracing is very costly and takes a long time to produce stable images. This project uses a smart adaptive filter that re-uses as much information as possible across many frames and pixels in order to produce robust and stable images."

This project is the result of work by one Christoph Schied, and was "a spare-time project to validate the results of computer graphics research in an actual game". Whatever your opinion of Q2VKPT, as we look back at Quake 2 and its impressive original lighting effects it's pretty clear that John Carmack was far ahead of his time (and it could be said that it's taken this long for hardware to catch up).

Source: Q2VKPT

Far Cry 4 Will Require Modest PC Hardware and Newer Operating Systems

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 04:07 AM |
Tagged: system requirements, pc gaming, kyrat, fps, far cry 4

In case you missed it earlier this week, Ubisoft revealed the PC system requirements needed to run Far Cry 4. Developed by Ubisoft Montreal and set to release on November 18th, Far Cry 4 is the latest action adventure FPS in the Far Cry series. The game uses Ubisoft's Dunia Engine II which is a heavily modified game engine originally based on Crytek's CryEngine 1 developed by Kirmaan Aboobaker. The player is a Nepalese native that returns to Kyrat, a fictional location in the Himalayas following the death of their mother only to become embroiled in a civil war taking place in an open world filled with enemies, weapons, animals, and did I mention weapons?

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This bow is a far cry from the only weapon you'll have access to...

According to the developer, Far Cry 4 continues the tradition of an open world environment, but the game world has been tweaked from the Far Cry 3 experience to be a tighter and more story focused experience where the single player story will take precedence over exploration and romps across the mountainous landscape.

While I can not comment on how the game plays, it certainly looks quite nice, and will need a beefy modern PC to run at its maximum settings. Interestingly, the game seems to scale down decently as well, with the entry level computer needed to run Far Cry 4 being rather modest.

No matter the hardware level, only 64-bit operating systems need apply, Far Cry 4 requires the 64-bit version of Windows 7 or later to run. At a minimum, Ubisoft recommends a quad core processor (Intel i5 750 or AMD Phenom II X4 955), 4GB of memory, a Radeon 5850 or GTX 460, and 30GB of storage.

To get optimal settings, users will need twice the system memory (at least 8GB) and video memory (at least 2GB), a newer quad core CPU such as the Intel i5-2400S or AMD FX-8350, and a modern NVIDIA GTX 680 or AMD Radeon R9 290X graphics card.

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Anything beyond that is gravy that will allow gamers to crank up the AA and AF as well as the resolution.

Far Cry 4 will be available in North America on November 18, 2014 for the PC, PS4, Xbox One, PS3, and Xbox 360. Following the North America release, the game is scheduled to launch in Europe and Australia on November 20th, and in Japan on January 22 of next year.

Source: Maximum PC

Crysis 3 System Requirements Revealed: Can Your PC Run Crysis?

Subject: General Tech | December 3, 2012 - 10:15 PM |
Tagged: Crysis 3, pc gaming, crytek, CryENGINE 3, fps

Today Crytek revealed the system requirements for its upcoming FPS Crysis 3 game. The third installment in the nanosuit-wearing sandbox shooter series looks poised to take full advantage of the latest PC hardware, which hopefully means a return to Cyrtek’s PC roots.

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On the low end, users will need to be running at least Windows Vista and have a system with a dual core processor, 2GB of RAM, and a DirectX 11 graphics card with 1GB memory. From there, the game will scale to using at least a quad core processor, 8GB system RAM, and either a NVIDIA GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970 graphics card for the high performance settings. There is no word on how (if?) the game will further be able to take advantage of multiple 7970/680 graphics cards in CrossFire/SLI to take the graphics to the extreme. Also, Crytek is not yet revealing details on graphical quality and what each of the specification tiers will get you in terms of graphics and framerate performance.

The full minimum, recommended, and high performance system requirements are listed below.

Crysis 3 PC System Requirements
  Minimum Recommended Hi-Performance
OS Windows Vista, 7, or 8 Windows Vista, 7, or 8 Windows Vista, 7, or 8
Graphics Card DirectX 11 GPU with 1GB memory DirectX 11 GPU with 1GB memory Latest DirectX 11 GPU
Processor Dual core Quad core Latest quad core
System memory 2GB (3GB on Vista) 4GB 8GB
Example Processors Intel E6600 or AMD Athlon64 X2 5200 Intel i3-530 or AMD Phenom II X2 565 Intel i7-2600K or AMD FX4150
Example Graphics Cards NVIDIA GTX 450 or AMD HD 5770 NVIDIA GTX 560 or AMD HD 5870 NVIDIA GTX 680 or AMD HD 7970

It is nice to see CryENGINE still being developed, and I look forward to it bringing my PC to its knees as it lies somewhere between the recommended and high performance requirements.

Are you excited for Crysis 3?

Source: IGN

PC Per(sonal) Game of the Year 2011

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | January 8, 2012 - 02:36 AM |
Tagged: opinion, gaming, game of the year, fps, deus ex: human revolution, deus ex

I have to say that 2011 was a pretty good year for PC gaming. Sure, it wasn't without some drab moments; however the diamonds in the rough more than made up for it. Those gems are the PC games that especially stood out for being of quality stock and most of all were awesomely fun.

Skyrim and Battlefield 3 have received a good deal of attention and praise among the PC Per staff, but I'm going to toss the guys a curve ball and name Deus Ex: Human Revolution as my personal favorite PC Game of the Year 2011. Here's why!

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Well, first a bit of history. Growing up, I was always a big PC gamer (earliest game I remember is Digger on an actually floppy floppy disk), but somehow missed the first Deus Ex. I read about it year after year on various technology and gaming sites' "Greatest PC Games of All Time" lists, but somehow never picked it up. A couple years ago, I saw it pop up on a Steam sale, so (naturally) I bought it and gave it a shot. There was a lot of hype behind it, and as such it had a lot to live up to.

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Try taking away my equiptment now!

Unfortunately, it never really came close to living up to all of the hype and praise that people gave it. That is not to say that it's a bad game, just that compared to the newer games that I was used to it wasn't my personal favorite. From the perspective of comparing it with games of its time, it certainly is an interesting release and relatively really good. Compared to the much improved graphics, controls, budgets, and hardware of years later (when I finally played it); however, it simply did not measure up. One of my main gripes with the game was that the AI was not all that great and at some points would have super vision that could spot me from a football field away in the shadows. Had I played it when it came out and had games of that era to compare it to, (and the nostalgic love) I'm sure I would be among those singing it's praises but as a late comer to the game I just wasn't interested.

While PC gamers grew up with Deus Ex, I grew up with the Metal Gear Solid series and I absolutely loved sneaking around and being Solid Snake. Sure, the story was a crazy one, but the same could be said for Deus Ex. That's not to say that I didn't play PC games like Doom 3 (I went from Wolfenstein 3D to Doom 3 due to not growing up with constant internet access living out in the boonies and not having the money for a powerful GPU) but that the games that most stick around in my mind as favorites and fond memories were things like MGS (whereas others may have held Deus Ex for example). I did find Deus Ex's story interesting though even if I wasn't too impressed with the graphics or game play, so when I read that a new Deus Ex was coming out and that it was getting the proper PC attention (thanks, Nixxes!) as it should, I jumped on the chance to play it. Now that I have built a few PCs and have a decent video card, playing the new Deus Ex: Human Revolution was a "no-brainer".

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Enough vents to make even Solid Snake jealous!

To make what could be a long and spoiler-ific story about Deus Ex: HR short, the game is my personal game of the year because it made me feel like Solid Snake again, vents and all. The conversations, hacking, story, augments, and graphics were all really fun and memorable. From walking around the city and listening to the people to punching through a wall to take out an enemy to sneaking through the vents and reading all the emails the game was immersive and I found myself staying up all night not wanting to go to sleep in favor of breaking into my co-workers office and reading their email... umm all in the name of keeping the office secure (some Head of Security I was!). Some of the comments I blogged about just after completing the game include that despite the long loading times, there are more vents than you can shake a stick at and being able to stealth around was very fun. More specifically, I noted:

"The emails and conversations that you overhear walking around the city are nice touches that help immersion. Some people have complained about the graphics quality; however, for what it is I find them to be very good. For a multi-platform game, it certainly runs well on the PC, which is an exceptional feat in this day and age!. . . . I have to say that it was an awesome experience!"

I'm sure that Ryan will disagree that Deus Ex: Human Revolution is the Game Of The Year, but for me it was very memorable, fun, and far exceeded my expectations. Now that I have found out about some cool sounding mods for the original Deus Ex, I may have to give it a second chance ;)

I invite the rest of the PC Per crew to share their personal Game of the Year as well as you, the readers! What was your favorite game this year, and why?

Runners up included Saints Row: The Third which is also crazy fun and Portal 2 who's story was awesome but came out so early in the year that it slipped my mind as GOTY.

TMAK World Votes Battlefield 3 Game Of The Year

Subject: General Tech | January 8, 2012 - 01:16 AM |
Tagged: games, game of the year, bf3, fps

TMAK World, a technology blog recently held a contest to see what game the site's users deserved the Game of the Year award. They received 1,117 votes and tallied them up for a top 10 list. According to the article, the top three games represented 75% of the votes, and the first and second games were both ones that released close to the end of the year.

Anyway, without further adieu, The Game of the Year for 2011 is Battlefield 3! The popular multi-player first person shooter (FPS) won with 33% of the votes. Portal 2 and Skyrim followed up in third and second place respectively with 14% and 26% of votes.

Continue on to TMAK World to find out which other PC games made the Top 10 list!

Source: TMAK World

Battlefield 3 Sells 5 Million Copies

Subject: General Tech | November 1, 2011 - 04:15 AM |
Tagged: PC, gaming, fps, ea, bf3, battlefield 3

As many readers of the site will know, the PC Perspective guys have been a “bit” interested in EA’s latest multiplayer first person shooter (FPS) Battlefield 3. Ryan for one has been “testing” Battlefield 3 extensively since the game’s release as he admitted on the latest TWICH podcast.

According to EA, the PC Per staff are not the only ones to enjoy the game (despite some game issues; I’m looking at you Origin) as Battlefield 3 has sold a whopping 5 million copies. It seems as though Battlefield 3 has emerged from the battle against stability issues to win the war and be a successful release. Battlefield 3’s sales have also impressed Electronic Arts who claimed the 5 million copies have surpassed their “best expectations.” Unfortunately, they have yet to release the numbers (that I want to see) concerning the percentage of sales of the PC versus the consoles.

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Another bit of positive BF3 news is that almost 99 % of the game stability issues have been fixed. M ore information on the game issues can be found here. Until next time, feel free to hit up the PCPER BF3 platoon and play with some fun people!

Source: Ars Technica