Not a fan of RGB LEDs? NXZT's Aer F series has you covered!

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 8, 2017 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: nxzt, fan, Aer F

The new Aer F series from NZXT offer you the chance to add some colour to your system, without the glow of RGB emanating from your system. They will fit nicely on most radiators as well as being useful as case fans.  The Trims are available in red, white or blue and are compatible with both the Aer F series as well as the Aer P series which is already on the market.

aer f 140.png

The Aer F series operates at lower noise levels than the Aer P, at the sacrifice of air flow, most due to the fan speeds topping out at 1500RPM as opposed to 2000RPM.  You can order the new 120mm fans for $17.99 or $29.99 for a twin pack; the 140mm are $19.99 and $32.99 respectively.  The trims are sold separately at $5.99 for two trims.

aer f deets.PNG

Los Angeles, CA – March 7, 2017 – Continuing to deliver increased performance for PC gamers and builders everywhere, NZXT today announces the newest member of its Aer family of fans with Aer F.

Designed to maximize airflow, Aer F is engineered to move air efficiently, letting even the most powerful systems breath with ease. Featuring the same chamfered intake and exhaust and winglet-designed fan blades found in Aer P radiator fans, Aer F delivers powerful airflow with reduced drag, minimizing resistance and vibration. Like it’s Aer family counterparts, Aer F is made with long-lasting fluid dynamic bearings further enhancing their durability and cooling performance.

“Pushing PC gaming to its limits is very important to us at NZXT,” says Johnny Hou, NZXT’s founder and CEO. “Whether you are overclocking the latest processors or running two Geforce GTX 1080 Ti graphic cards in SLI, products like Aer F are designed to maximize performance without being intrusive. Having a PC running cool and quiet makes for a deeper more immersive gaming experience.”

Aer F main features:

  • PWM fan designed for better airflow and near-silent performance.
  • Winglet constructed fan blades minimize drag, improving overall cooling.
  • Patented fluid dynamic bearings (FDB) deliver long-lasting operation. (60,000 hours / 6 years)
  • Sleeved cables for easy and clean cable management.
  • Replaceable color trim choices give builders the flexibility to customize their builds (sold separately)

Silence and Cooling Optimized
With sleeved cables, vibration dampeners, chamfered-intake and exhaust, and winglet designed fan blades on the impeller; Aer F is designed and engineered from top-to-bottom to make sure gamers get the best cooling performance without compromising their gaming experience.

Built to Last
Patented fluid dynamic bearings, made from copper, gives Aer F the durability to perform for six years, staying relevant well beyond your next graphics card.

Color Your Way
Aer Trims, compatible with Aer F and Aer P, are available in Red, White, and Blue, enabling builders to color-coordinate their builds, their way. Aer Trims are sold separately.

Source: NZXT

Noctua Releases PWM Controlled NF-A14 140mm Case Fan

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 3, 2013 - 06:32 AM |
Tagged: pwm, noctua, nf-a14, fan

Austrian PC Cooling manufacturer Noctua has released a new fan called the NF-A14. The new fan is PWM controlled and aimed at case or watercooling radiator cooling. The NF-A14 uses a square frame and features higher static pressure than the NF-P13 along with a maximum speed of 1500RPM.

Noctua NF-A14 PWM 140mm Case Fan.jpg

The fan kit comes with the fan itself, mounting screws, a rubber mounting system to reduce vibration, a 30mm extension cable, low-noise adapter, and a 4-pin Y splitter cable that allows two PWM fans to be connected to a single motherboard fan header. The new Noctua NF-A14 comes with a 6 year warranty.

Noctua NF-A14 PWM 140mm Case Fan1.jpg

You can find more information on Noctua’s website as well as the full press release after the break.

In other cooling news:

Source: Noctua

Prolimatech PT14015 Fan With 17 Blades Pictured

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 5, 2012 - 11:30 PM |
Tagged: pt14015, prolimatech, fan, case fan, APL

Prolimatech reportedly has a new fan on the way that is based on the PT12025 fan developed by Prolimatech and Air Propulsion Labratory if photos uncovered by EXPreview hold true. The new PT14015 is a thin 140mm fan that is designed to balance airflow and noise as well as to be compatible with many tower-style heatsinks without blocking the memory slots.

 

Prolimatech PT14015.jpg

The Prolimatech PT14015 is 15mm thick and has 17 14cm-long blades. Interestingly, it has mounting holes that line up with 120mm fans that should increase the compatibility with existing radiators and processor heatsinks. The curved fins have a sharp leading edge, and the 17 moving blades and increased 140mm form factor should make the PT14015 a fairly quiet fan.

There is no word yet on pricing or availability, but EXPreview has several photos of the new fan. As far as fans go, it looks pretty cool (pun intended).

Source: EXPreview

Corsair takes fan testing seriously

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 21, 2011 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: visit, fan, corsair

I have been wandering around the Bay area for the last several days and stopped in to see some of our favorite hardware and technology companies.  We saw a lot of really interesting things that we can't quite discuss yet, but this machine we found in the Corsair testing labs was kind of interesting.  Have you ever wondered how fans get all those ratings like CFMs, dBAs and speed curves?

fanthing1.jpg

Meet the LongWin LW-9266 Fan Performance Measurement Apparatus.  Not something from Aperture Science as you might guess, this device lets Corsair test new fan options for their heatsinks, cases and H-series liquid coolers to find those that are the quietest, the most efficient and the provide the best pressure results for cooling particular heatsinks, etc.

fanthing2.jpg

The idea is simple enough - connect a fan (or a fan behind a heatsink) to the end of the LW-9266 and turn on the machine, set some variables and let it go.  Air is pushed by the fan into the blue chamber up to and another fan blower moves air in the same direction to equalize pressure, thus it can tell how much air is actually being moved.

fanthing3.jpg

The whole process is quite a bit more complicated that I am making it out to be of course - I just got the crash course.  Interestingly, this Delta fan they were showing off for me was so loud, it droned out the rest of the testing contraption completely.  Air speed = high, noise = high.  I didn't need a machine for that.

fanthing4.jpg

Here is a sample result from a previous fan test that shows some performance results.  Other than the cool factor here, there isn't much to report, but it is good to see Corsair making investments in actually TESTING stuff they are selling to consumers rather than taking OEMs word on specifications, etc. 

Source: Corsair