Podcast #502 - Computex coverage and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 7, 2018 - 11:50 AM |
Tagged: xTend, xps, video, Vega, Threadripper, Snapdragon 850, seasonic, scmd, ROG, qualcomm, podcast, Optane, nvidia, microsoft, logitech, Killer Wireless, Isaac, InWin, Intel, i7-8086k, git, fortnite, EPYC, dell, crystal, corsair, CaseKing, asus, aorus, amd, 7nm

PC Perspective Podcast #502 - 06/07/18

Join us this week for discussion on Computex and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:45:27

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
    1. 1:00:40 ASUS all the things
  3. Picks of the Week:
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

Computex 2018: AMD Announces New EPYC Design Wins

Subject: General Tech | June 5, 2018 - 10:36 PM |
Tagged: server, EPYC, enterprise, amd

AMD started off its Computex 2018 livestream by announcing three new design wins for its EPYC server processors. Specifically, AMD's EPYC is being picked up by Cisco, HPE, and Tencent for new server products that will be aimed at heavy virtualization workloads where the physical servers will be host to many virtual machines used for all manner of enterprise applications in the both private and public clouds.

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Specifically, AMD notes that Cisco will be using EPYC in a new UCS solution where AMD notes that EPYC offers up 128% more cores, 50% more servers, and 20% more storage per rack than the competition. Cisco's Unified Computing System (UCS) is a high performance converged platform that combines servers, networking, storage, and management together into a rack-able solution that is all interconnected by a Cisco fabric.

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HPE (the enterprise focused spin off from HP) is also adopting EPYC with the announcement today of its first AMD EPYC powered single socket Proliant server: the HPE Proliant DL325 Gen 10. AMD claims its EPYC processors (up to 32 cores / 64 threads) offers up to 25% lower cost per VM than the leading dual socket competitor. In the datacenter world TCO (total cost of ownership) is king and EPYC does have a core count advantage over Intel in this space.

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Finally, AMD announced that China-based Tencent SA1 cloud service will begin offering AMD EPYC powered instances as soon as today with EPYC offering up to 30% lower cost per VM to Tencent.

AMD did not go into more specifics on the announcements, but it is nice to see EPYC getting some design wins. If you are still awake at this time, you can catch the AMD livestream on Youtube here. Here is what you have to look forward to according to AMD CEO Lisa Su: AMD Vega graphics, FreeSync, Ryzen, Threadripper 2, and 7nm Radeon Vega GPUs.

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Source: AMD

Velocity Micro Unleashes Epyc ProMagix HD150 Workstation

Subject: Systems | May 3, 2018 - 07:39 AM |
Tagged: velocity micro, EPYC, EPYC 7601, amd, workstation

AMD scored another design win with Velocity Micro announcing a new workstation built around the Zen-based EPYC processor. The new ProMagix HD150 is a single socket Epyc-based system that slots in between the company's existing ThreadRipper-based HD80A and the dual socket Epyc HD360A workstations. The Velocity Micro system takes the company's GX4 aluminum E-ATX chassis and crams a ton of processing power into it.

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The new workstation is based around the Supermicro H11SSL motherboard and it can be confiugred with up to an AMD Epyc 7601 processor with 32 cores and 64 threads clocked at 2.2 GHz base and 3.2 GHz boost with 64MB L3 cache and 128 lanes of PCI-E. The processor which is cooled by a closed loop liquid cooler with 240mm radiator can be paired with up to 512GB DDR4-2666 ECC RDIMMs or 256GB ECC LRDIMMs for main memory and up to a 2TB Samsung 960 Pro SSD (or two Crucial MX550s) and two 8TB mechanical hard drives for storage. The Supermicro board has sixteen SATA ports as well as multiple PCI-E x16 and x8 slots so users can add plenty of additional storage and I/O expansion. Further, users can configure the system with a NVIDIA Quadro GP100 graphics accelerator as well as up to two Radeon Pro SSG Vega 10 cards (there are also NVIDIA GTX, Titan, and Quadro or AMD Vega, WX Pro, and SSG options) for GPGPU tasks. The two Radeon Pro SSG cards have 4096 stream processors, 16GB of HBM2, and 2TB of solid state storage each and are rated at 12.3 TFLOPS of single precision and 769 GFLOPS of double precision performance.

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Needless to say, you can configure an extremely capable workstation thanks to AMD's Epyc that can handle both CPU and GPU efficient tasks with plenty of I/O lanes for storage and expansion. Velocity Micro claims that the HD150 workstation is aimed at simulation, rendering, 8K video editing, and machine learning workloads. The systems can be configured on their website or customized by ordering over the phone and start at $3,299 with a default one year warranty and lifetime US-based support. The workstations are built and tested in Richmond, Virginia. As far as pricing, this, ahem, Epyc system is squarely an enterprise affair with fully loaded configurations passing $33,000 easily.

It is promising to see AMD's server processor getting design wins in this market space.

Author:
Subject: Editorial
Manufacturer: Intel

2018: A banner year

Intel has a long history of generating tremendous amounts of revenue and income. This latest quarter is no exception. Intel has announced record Q1 revenues for this year and they look to continue that trend throughout 2018. AMD released their very positive results yesterday, but their finances are dwarfed by what Intel has brought to market. The company had revenue of $16.1 billion with a net income of $4.5 billion. Compare this to AMD’s $1.625B revenue and $81M net income we see that the massive gulf between these two companies will not be bridged anytime soon with either Intel falling or AMD gaining.

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Intel has put its money to good use with a wide variety of products that stretch between the PC market and datacenters. While their low power and ultra-mobile strategies have been scaled back and cancelled in some cases, their core markets are unaffected and they continue to make money hand over fist. The company has always been fundamentally sound in terms of finances and they do not typically spend money recklessly. They continue to feature market leading IPC with their product lines and can address multiple markets with the x86 products they have.

Click here to continue reading about Intel's Q1 results!

There's a fair amount of performance embedded in AMD's new chips

Subject: General Tech | February 26, 2018 - 12:04 PM |
Tagged: EPYC, ryzen, amd, embedded, epyc 3000, ryzen v1000

The Register have put up a bit more information about AMD's new embedded versions of Ryzen and Epyc.  The Epyc 3000 will appear in networking, storage and edge computing devices, offering 64 PCIe lanes, eight 10 GbitE, 16 SATA, and up to 4 memory channels per CPU.  The Ryzen V1000 APU will be more for POS and entertainment, with 16 PCIe lanes, dual 10 GbitE, four USB 3.1 and up to four independent 4k displays.  Alternatively, it can support a 5k display, with support for H.265 and VP9 codecs.  Get a look at all the models here.

epyc_3000_models_950.jpg

"The semiconductor firm is aiming Epyc 3000 at networking, storage and edge computing devices and the Ryzen V1000 at medical imaging, industrial systems, digital gaming and thin clients. Both are embedded systems."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Podcast #488 - AMD Ryzen performance, Qualcomm news, and more!

Subject: General Tech | February 22, 2018 - 08:58 AM |
Tagged: video, TrueWireless, snapdragon 845, Ryzen 5 2400G, raven ridge, qualcomm, Primochill Vue, podcast, mx master 2s, logitech, Kigen, EPYC, cherry, bitfenix, amd, 850W

PC Perspective Podcast #488 - 02/22/18

Join us this week for AMD Ryzen performance reviews, Qualcomm news, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg, Ken Addison

Program length: 1:20:48

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:12:30 Allyn: UltraVNC
    2. 1:18:10 Josh: My poor wife
  4. Closing/outro
 
 
Source:

AMD goes after $15B embedded space with two new embedded processors

Subject: Processors | February 21, 2018 - 11:22 AM |
Tagged: amd, ryzen, EPYC, embedded, ryzen v1000, epyc 3000

Continuing its expansion of bringing modern processor and graphics designs to as many of its targeted market segments as possible, AMD announced today two new families that address the embedded processor space. The company has already seen double-digital YoY sequential growth in revenue from embedded markets, but the release of the Epyc Embedded 3000 and Ryzen Embedded V1000 family create significant additional opportunity for the company.

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Embedded markets are unique from traditional consumer and enterprise channels as they address areas from military and aerospace applications to networking hardware and storage devices to retail compute and even casino and arcade gaming. These markets tend to be consistent and stable without the frequent or dramatic swings in architectural preference or market share that we often witness in consumer PCs. As AMD continues to grow and look for stable sources of adjacent income, embedded processors are a critical avenue and one that I believe AMD has distinct advantages in.

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Research firm IDC estimates the market size that AMD can address with this pair of chip families exceeds $14-15B annually. The largest portion of that ($11-12B) includes storage and networking infrastructure systems that the Epyc 3000 line will target. The remaining amount includes IoT gateways, medical systems, and casino gaming hardware and is the purview of the Ryzen V1000.

Competitors in this space include Intel (with its Xeon D-series and Core family of chips) and many Arm-based designs that focus on low power integration. Intel has the most potential for immediate negative impact with AMD’s expansion in the embedded markets as the shared architecture and compatibility mean customers can more easily move between platforms. AMD is positioning both parts directly against Intel with proposed advantages in value and performance, hoping to move embedded customers to the combined AMD solution.

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The Ryzen V1000 family combines the company’s recent processor and graphics architectures on a single chip, similar in function to the consumer Ryzen design that was released for notebook and desktop PCs. For the embedded customers and devices being targeted, this marks a completely new class of product with two key benefits over competing solutions. First, it allows for smaller and cooler system designs (critical for the cramped working environments of the embedded space) while increasing maximum performance.

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Second, the V1000 allows integrators to downscale from using a combination of an Intel processor and a separate, discrete graphics chip to a single chip design. This both raises the ASP (average selling price) for AMD, increasing revenue and potential margin, while lowering the price that customers pay in total for system components.

While AMD struggles to find ways to promote the value of higher performance graphics on its new processors, where it has a significant advantage over Intel, for the consumer and business space, in the embedded markets that additional performance value is well understood. Casino gaming often utilizes multiple high-resolution displays for a single device with demand for high-quality rendered 3D graphics, of which the V1000 can now provide in a single chip design. The same is seen with medical imaging hardware, including ultrasound machines for women’s healthcare and cardiovascular diagnostics.

amdembed3.png

The Epyc Embedded 3000 family does not include integrated graphics on-chip and instead offers higher core performance and performance per dollar compared to competing Intel solutions. AMD believes that the Epyc 3000 will double the total addressable market for the company when it comes to networking and storage infrastructure.

amdembed4.png

AMD previously has disclosed its partnership with Cisco that included AMD-built processor options for some families of switches and other networking gear. As the demand for edge computing grows (systems that will exist near the consumer or enterprise side of a network to aid in computational needs of high speed networks), AMD is offering a compelling solution to counter the Intel Xeon family of processors.

Both the Epyc 3000 and Ryzen V1000 chips represent the first time AMD has targeted embedded customers with specific features and capabilities at the hardware level. During the design phase of its Zen CPU and Vega graphics architecture, business unit leaders included capabilities like multiple 10-gigabit network integration, support of four 4K display outputs, ECC memory (error correction capability for mission-critical applications), and unique embedded-based interfaces for external connectivity.

While these were not needed for the consumer segments of the market, and weren’t exposed in those hardware launches, they provide crucial benefits for AMD customers when selecting a chip for embedded markets.

Source: AMD

Podcast #486 - AMD Mobile APUs, new Xeon-D processors, EPYC offerings from Dell, and more!

Subject: General Tech | February 8, 2018 - 11:21 AM |
Tagged: podcast, amd, raven ridge, 2500U, APU, Intel, xeon-d, dell, EPYC, vaunt, Tobii

PC Perspective Podcast #486 - 02/08/18

Join us this week for a recap of news and reviews including AMD Mobile APUs, new Xeon-D processors, EPYC offerings from Dell, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Allyn Malventano, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:16:53

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:12:15 Alex: Terraria
  4. Closing/outro
 

Dell's Epyc package

Subject: General Tech | February 7, 2018 - 04:41 PM |
Tagged: amd, dell, EPYC, R6415, R7415, R7425

Dell has released three new PowerEdge server models, all powered by one or two of AMD's new EPYC chips.  The R6415 is a single socket, 1U server which supports 1TB of RAM, though The Register does point to a PR slide that implies 2TB might be achievable.  The R7415 is larger at 2U because it can hold up to 12 SAS/SATA/NVMe + 12 NVMe drives or up to 14 3.5" drives.  Last up is the dual socket R7425 with either 32 SATA/SAS drives or 24 NVMe flash drives and up to 4TB of RAM.  Check out more specs at The Register.

epyc_performance_950.jpg

"There are three PowerEdge AMD-powered servers: the R6415, R7415, and R7425. These accompany the PowerEdge 14G R640 and R740 Xeon SP servers in the Round Rock company's server portfolio, and they inherit general PowerEdge management and feature goodness."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register
Author:
Subject: Editorial
Manufacturer: AMD

Beating AMD and Analyst Estimates

January 30th has rolled around and AMD released their Q4 2017 results. The results were positive and somewhat unexpected. I have been curious how the company fared and was waiting for these results to compare them to the relatively strong quarter that Intel experienced. At the Q3 earnings AMD was not entirely bullish about how Q4 would go. The knew that it was going to be a down quarter as compared to an unexpectedly strong third quarter, but they were unsure how that was going to pan out. The primary reason that Q4 was not going to be as strong was due to the known royalty income that AMD was expecting from their Semi-Custom Group. Q4 has traditionally been bad for that group as all of their buildup for the holiday season came from Q1 and Q2 rampings of the physical products that would be integrated into consoles.

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The results exceeded AMD’s and analysts’ expectations. They were expecting in the $1.39B range, but their actual revenue came in at a relatively strong $1.48B. Not only was the quarter stronger than expected, but AMD was able to pull out another positive net income of $61M. It has been a while since AMD was able to post back to back profitable quarters. This allowed AMD to have a net positive year to the tune of $43M where in 2016 AMD had a loss of $497M. 2017 as a whole was $1.06B more in revenue over 2016. AMD has been historically lean in terms of expenses for the past few years, and a massive boost in revenue has allowed them to invest in R&D as well as more aggressively ramp up their money making products to compete more adequately with Intel, who is having their own set of issues right now with manufacturing and security.

Click here to continue reading about AMD's Q4 2017 Earnings analysis!