Shockwave Director Exit Stage Left

Subject: General Tech | April 9, 2019 - 04:42 PM |
Tagged: Adobe, shockwave, adobe director, EoL

While its sibling, Adobe Flash, still has 2020 and the rest of 2019 to entertain you with web games, the company has officially ended support for Shockwave Player. Attempting to go to the download page redirects you to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for End of Life of Adobe Shockwave, which politely tells you to rethink your life decisions.

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Joking aside, it is a bit sad to see all this content disappear. The late 90s and early aughts had a few hours spent playing 3D mini golf, some tank combat games, and so forth. There was a time when both Director and Flash were on my list of things to download the day of a Windows reinstall. (In fact, it used to be Shockwave before Flash!) It’s better now that all of that is integrated into the browser, despite the occasional person who tries to convince me that the web should be for nothing more than documents. Little apps that can run anywhere is a powerful concept.

Have any Shockwave Director memories? Let us know in the comments!

Source: Adobe

Nice OS you have there; shame if something happened to it

Subject: General Tech | March 21, 2019 - 01:02 PM |
Tagged: Windows 7, windows 10, microsoft, EoL

It does have to be said that running a 10 year old Microsoft OS might not be the wisest decision; though it is better than running one 18 years old.  However, as we learned in 2017 many businesses are not even close to adopting Windows 10 on the majority of their systems.  There are numerous reasons for that delay, from licensing through security to privacy not to mention the interface is different enough to upset many executive level users. 

That hasn't stopped Microsoft from once again displaying splash screens on Windows 7 machines, as KB4493132 rolls out to those with automatic updates enabled.  Thankfully it does not attempt to fool you into updating by changing the way they close window button works but then again, the update is no longer free.  The Inquirer, as you might expect, is as enthused about this as most users.

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"HERE WE GO AGAIN. Two years on from Updategate, Microsoft is back to posting nag screens on its outgoing operating system."

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Source: The Inquirer

Blizzard Cutting Support for Windows XP and Vista

Subject: General Tech | February 19, 2017 - 05:07 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, blizzard, windows, EoL

Most companies have already abandoned Windows XP and Vista, including Microsoft once Vista leaves extended support in April, but Blizzard is known for long-term support. This is the company that is still selling Diablo 2, even producing retail disks for it last I checked, almost seventeen years after it was released (including a patch last year).

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Later this year, World of Warcraft, StarCraft II, Diablo III, Hearthstone, and Heroes of the Storm will no longer support Windows XP or Vista. This will not all happen at once, even though it would actually make less sense if they did. I mean, why would they coordinate several teams to release a patch at the same time and maximize annoyance to the affected users who cannot schedule or afford an upgrade at that specific time?

Although, if that’s you, then you should probably get around to it sooner than later.

Source: Blizzard

Windows 7 and 8.1 did stop shipping to OEMs

Subject: General Tech | November 2, 2016 - 12:57 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, OEM, windows, EoL

We've known for quite some time that Microsoft planned to stop providing OEMs with keys for Windows 7 or 8.1 this Halloween and they have made good on that promise.  If you already have a valid license you will contine to be able to use it on your machine and even reinstall from scratch but you won't be able to buy a machine without Windows 10 anymore.  On the corporate side this is being ignored, the new machine may ship with Win10 installed but that will not last long.  This is your last chance to grab one of the few remaining unused Windows 7 or 8.1 keys, The Register managed to spot at least one company still offering a Win7 downgrade so get moving if that is your plan.

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"If you can get Dell, HP Inc, Lenovo or any other PC-maker to sell you a PC running Windows 7 Professional or Windows 8.1, please let us know how you did it because Microsoft no longer sells the operating system to OEMs."

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Source: The Register

A day for living dangerously in a Microsoft ecosystem

Subject: General Tech | July 14, 2015 - 01:01 PM |
Tagged: winxp, server 2003, EoL

Today is the day, Server 2003 is no longer supported by Microsoft, at least not without a payment of $600 per server to extend coverage.  No more patches for exploits nor will Microsoft technicians be interested in your high priority requests for help with issues.  For many companies it will be business as usual while the IT departments seek out third party tools to help prevent the inevitable infections which will start to take down entire infrastructures.  Sadly the cries of 'I told you so' will fall on deaf ears and cost many a job as executives who can't bear the idea of using a smartphone more than one year old fail to comprehend a 12 year old server OS is a bad thing.  As The Inquirer points out, Microsoft is not entirely free from blame here, they have failed to produce Server 2016 at this point and unless you want to move to Azure you would have to upgrade to other versions slated start their end in less than three years.

For users of another deprecated OS, Windows XP, you will no longer be receiving Malicious Software Removal Tool updates.  While you should not be relying solely on that product for your security it is a layer of defense you can no longer count on.  For the 12% of PCs that still run WinXP across the globe, you should be considering an upgrade and as Scott pointed out you have little time left to grab a preview of Windows 10 to test before its release.  Microsoft representatives claim there is no coincidence that it ended on the same day Server 2003 and that this particular decison was made a year ago.

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"Other reasons for the lack of urgency have included the delay to Server 2016, which should have been released by now, and the austere times making for a 'mend and make do' mentality."

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Source: The Register

What if a server OS died and no one cared

Subject: General Tech | July 10, 2015 - 12:41 PM |
Tagged: server 2003, microsoft, idiots, EoL

In a lack of foresight that will not take anyone working professionally in IT by surprise, 70% of business are ignoring the fact that Windows Server 2003 hits EoL next Tuesday.  The belief that what your clients don't know won't hurt them is endemic in the business world and this is yet more proof of that philosophy.  Most businesses sign agreements guaranteeing their clients data will be stored securely and using an unsupported OS over a decade old stretches the definition of secure storage far beyond the breaking point.  Your bank, your payroll company, your government, even your ISP and telephone provider are all likely to be guilty of this and you should be aware of that.  It does not mean that there will be a sudden outbreak of attacks next week, instead it will be a slow rise in the number of security breaches and leaks as more and more exploits are discovered and never patched.  The Inquirer does not have the numbers on how many companies are taking Microsoft's offer of support for Server 2003 beyond Tuesday for $600 per server but you can bet that the uptake is a tiny percentage of the 70%.   Much like the proverbial frog, people will not notice the slow rise in security breaches until the damage is already irreversible.

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"WE'RE AT T-MINUS four days and counting, and a new survey suggests that as many as 70 percent of businesses are going to miss the deadline for upgrading from Windows Server 2003."

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Source: The Register

Google Chrome Team Commits to XP Throughout 2015

Subject: General Tech | April 17, 2015 - 07:00 AM |
Tagged: windows xp, windows, microsoft, google, EoL, chrome

It has been a year since Microsoft cut off extended support for Windows XP including Internet Explorer security updates for the platform. Yeah, I know, it doesn't feel like it. Other browser vendors announced that they would continue to target the retired OS after Microsoft washed their hands of it. At the time, Google said they would give at least 12 months support, which brings us to yesterday.

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Now Google is extending their commitment to the end of the year. They did not say that it was a hard deadline for their customers, but they also did not add an “at least” qualifier this time. The browser vendor wants people to upgrade and admits that they cannot genuinely provide a secure experience if a known issue bites everyone at the OS level. You can keep training the guard at the door, but if your window falls out, mind the pun, then it is still dangerous to be inside.

Granted, we have not seen a major attack on XP over the last year. You would have to think that, even if the attacks are sophisticated, some of the victims would have noticed and reported it to someone. Still, I wonder how it keeps surviving, especially since I would have thought that at least one vulnerability in the last twelve Patch Tuesdays could be ported back to it.

Maybe it is too small of a target?

Source: Google

Ignorance may be bliss but it will cost you $600 per Server 2003 installation

Subject: General Tech | February 17, 2015 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, server 2003, idiots, EoL

If you ever feel ignored when offering technical advice to executives or anyone ranking above you in your business then this statistic about Server 2003 that The Register quotes will come as no surprise, "47 percent of 1,000 Fortune 500 IT executives had no idea that end-of-life was coming".  Of course this does not signify that they were never told nor that Microsoft obfuscated the EoL date, it shows that they completely ignored the professionals that work for them and warned them.   Now they will have a choice, they can run servers that no longer receive security updates nor support from Microsoft or they can pay $600 per server for a year of extended support, with that amount likely increasing every year.  It does not make business sense to migrate to every new server or client platform that is released but postponing that upgrade for over a decade in the assumption that your supplier will never cut you out is bordering on idiocy.   Just to add to your frustration, none of those supposed IT executives are likely to be fired as a direct result of this poor planning and on the off chance one does leave; the severance they pick up will likely be worth more money than you have made since the release of Server 2003.

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"MICROSOFT HAS PUT a price on extended support for servers running Windows Server 2003 after it reaches end-of-life this summer."

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Source: The Register

Need a consulting gig and know AD and Exchange?

Subject: General Tech | January 20, 2015 - 12:46 PM |
Tagged: server 2003, microsoft, EoL, migration

There are over eight million active servers running Server 2003 according to the stats The Register has seen and who knows how many Server 2000 installs still kicking around but as of the 14th of July extended support for Server 2003 ends and no longer will security patches or support be available.  The difficulty of prying WinXP out of users hands will be nothing compared to convincing stakeholders to part with money to upgrade to a new version of Server, be it hosted onsite or via Azure and O365.  There will be some companies wise enough to find leverage to start the migration soon but there will also be many who will not see the cost benefit until their system fails or even worse, a breach occurs.  If you have any knowledge of newer versions of ActiveDirectory, Exchange or Azure and O365 you should update your resume as there will be people looking for help migrating in the near future.

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"A channel-wide migration skills shortage is a real danger this summer as stragglers strain available resources by making an eleventh hour dash to flee Windows Server 2003, distributor veterans are warning."

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Source: The Register