A New Take on the Budget Legend

It is not hyperbole to call Cooler Master’s Hyper 212 family some of the most important CPU air coolers in the industry, with the 212 EVO dominating sales in the DIY segment for years now based on Amazon rankings. In the last five years I have reviewed a number of coolers here at PC Perspective, and feedback from readers almost always includes mention of, and requests for comparison to, that Hyper 212 EVO. I have tested this venerable cooler more than once over the years, but it has proven to be such a vital part of any CPU air-cooling discussion that it demands to be part of every cooler review lineup. Today we will benchmark that cooler yet again using the current test platform, and compare it to a new generation of Hyper 212: the Black Edition.

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The Hyper 212 Black Edition coolers, available with or without an RGB fan, add a level of style that had been missing from the 212 EVO, trading exposed copper heat pipes and bare aluminum heatsink fins for a polished, all-black finish. Naturally style means nothing without performance, and with the RGB Black Edition we are still looking at a single tower heatsink design with four heat pipes that are designed to make direct contact with the CPU, and air is still being moved via a single 120 mm fan.

Features from Cooler Master:

  • Sleek Finishing - Anodized gun-metal black with brushed aluminum surface finish to the top cover for a more refined look
  • Precise Air Flow with Nickel Black - Stacked fin array ensures least airflow resistance which allows cooler air flow into the heatsink. The nickel plated jet black also enhances radiation cooling performance
  • Direct Contact Technology - 4 heat pipes with exclusive Direct Contact Technology providing effective and excellent heat dissipation
  • The New SF120R RGB Fan - Certified to sync with Motherboard RGB software or controlled by our controller. The wide speed range can be fine-tuned for maximum cooling performance or silent operation
  • Optional Push-Pull Fan Configuration - To avoid dynamic losses and help accelerate heat exhaust, an additional fan helps pulling heat away faster from heatsink
  • RGB in the Palm of Your Hand with Included Wired RGB Controller - A compact size RGB LED controller that allows you to easily customize your RGB devices without the need for either an RGB capable motherboard or software. You can have the colorful rig you’ve always wanted with just the touch of a button

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Continue reading our review of the Cooler Master Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition cooler!

Report: Intel Pentium Gold G5620 on the Way: First 4 Ghz Pentium

Subject: Processors | February 20, 2019 - 09:59 AM |
Tagged: rumor, report, processor, pentium, Intel, G5620, G5600T, G5420T, G5420, G4950, G4930T, G4930, cpu, celeron

The Pentium processor has been around since the end of the 486 era, introduced in 1993 at a startling cost of $878 for the 60 MHz version, and $964 for 66 MHz (when purchased in quantities of 1000, that is). Now Intel is taking Pentium into uncharted waters for 2019, with the Pentium Gold G5620 reaching 4.0 GHz for the first time for a processor bearing the iconic brand.

Pentium_Gold.jpg

Image via Tom's Hardware

According to reports from Tom's Hardware and AnandTech the Pentium G5620, listed early by retailers in Europe, is a 2-core / 4-thread part that will apparently be at the top of the new budget desktop CPU lineup. Alongside the Pentium G5620 there will refreshed Pentium and Celeron CPUs, as listed by Tom's Hardware:

"...the other processors listed include the G5420 (3.8 GHz, 2/4), G5600T (3.3 GHz, 2/4), G5420T (3.2 GHz, 2/4), the Celeron G4950 (3.3 GHz, 2/2), the Celeron G4930 (3.2 GHz, 2/2), and the Celeron G4930T (3.0 GHz, 2/2)."

We do not have an Intel announcement yet of course, so no details about architecture, process tech, or official pricing. March or April is the expected timeframe based on the listings, and with no official release dates we can only speculate on actual availability here in the U.S.

Intel's 28-Core Xeon W-3175X Processor Listed on Newegg

Subject: Processors | February 1, 2019 - 04:37 PM |
Tagged: xeon, workstation, W-3175X, system integrator, SI, processor, parts, OEM, newegg, Intel, DIY, cpu

In a move that would seem to contradict what we have heard about Intel's new 28-core Xeon W-3175X processor, Newegg currently has it listed as a standalone CPU part for $2977.99.

The official announcement from Intel had only mentioned availability via pre-built workstations from system integrators:

"How You Get It: The Intel Xeon W-3175X processor is available from system integrators that develop purpose-built desktop workstations."

newegg_w3175x.png

Product page at Newegg.com

Though not available for purchase (yet?), the existence of this product entry in Newegg's system suggests that the DIY community will have access to Intel's most powerful workstation processor after all, and without a markup over the tray price.

Source: Newegg
Manufacturer: Scythe

A Low-Cost Air Cooler for Intel and AMD

Scythe’s Katana 5 is a low-cost CPU air cooler that retails for less than $30, offers compatibility with Intel and AMD processors, and has a small footprint that won’t interfere with memory modules. Can this ultra-compact tower design and single 92mm fan cope with our test platform’s toasty Core i7-7700K? Let’s find out!

Katana5_Main.jpg

"The 5th generation of KATANA cooler, it has asymmetric design offering unlimited compatibility. Upgraded with E.C.M.S II mounting system and new Kaze Flex 92mm fan ensure simple installation and good thermal performance."


Katana 5 Specifications:

  • Model Number: SCKTN-5000
  • Compatibility:
    • Intel: LGA 775, 1150, 1151, 1155, 1156, 1366
    • AMD: Socket AM2, AM2+, AM3, AM3+, AM4, FM1, FM2, FM2+
  • Dimensions: 105 x 104 x 135 mm / 4.13 x 4.09 x 5.31 inches
  • Overall Weight: 560 g / 19.75 oz (including fan)
  • Material of Base Plate: Nickel-plated copper 38 x 38 mm
  • Fan Specifications
    • Dimensions: 92 x 92 x 26 mm / 3.62 x 3.62 x 1.02 inch
    • Air Flow: 11.46 - 83.04 m³/h = 6.75 - 48.878 CFM
    • Fan Speed: 300 - 2,300 rpm (regulated via PWM)
    • Static Pressure: 7.35~22.46 Pa / 0.75~2.29 mmH2O

Pricing: $28.45 USD list (returns to stock in USA this month)

Katana5_Box.jpg

Continue reading our review of the Scythe Katana 5 CPU cooler

Intel's Xeon W-3175X is a 28-Core Workstation Monster

Subject: Processors | January 30, 2019 - 08:13 PM |
Tagged: xeon, workstation, W-3175X, processor, Intel, cpu

Officially unveiled back in October, Intel's newly-launched Xeon W-3175X processor is now available from system integrators, and it is far more extreme than the Xeon name might indicate.

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The Xeon W-3175X in action (image via Intel)

Here is a look at the specs from Intel:

  • Base Clock Speed: 3.1 GHz
  • Maximum Single Core Turbo Frequency: 4.3 GHz
  • Cores/Threads: 28/56
  • TDP: 255W
  • Intel Smart Cache: 38.5 MB
  • Unlocked: Yes
  • Platform PCIE Lanes: Up to 68
  • Memory Support: Six Channels, DDR4-2666
  • Standard RAS Support: Yes
  • ECC Support: Yes
  • RCP Pricing (USD 1K): $2,999

This unlocked 28-core/56-thread CPU offers a base clock speed of 3.1 GHz and Turbo of up to 4.3 GHz (single-thread), and that level of performance comes with a 255-watt TDP. In fact a special cooler from Asetek was also announced today which was developed with Intel for this CPU.

ASETEK_34591.jpg

Image credit: Asetek

And while a $3000 price tag is obviously not going to drive this into mainstream adoption, this processor only being offered through system integrators at this time, and is aimed at the high-end workstation segment. As to performance, there are some day-one reviews out there from GamersNexus, AnandTech, and PC World, among others, and the consensus seems to be that this is an impressive performer, with particular workload the key to performance relative to competing options such as AMD's Threadripper 2990WX (which currently sells for $1730).

xeon_w_3175_pcworld.jpg

Image credit: PC World

We don't have the answers yet about about total platform costs with motherboard pricing currently an unknown, and (more importantly) system integrators the only way to obtain it, but performance in Adobe CS applications alone will likely make this attractive to content creators at the very least.

Source: Intel

Intel Unveils Next-Gen Sunny Cove CPU, Gen11 Graphics, and 3D Stacking Technology

Subject: Processors | December 12, 2018 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: xeon, Sunny Cove, processor, intel core, Intel, integrated graphics, iGPU, Foveros, cpu, 3D stacking

Intel’s Architecture Day was held yesterday and brought announcements of three new technologies. Intel shared details of a new 3D stacking technology for logic chips, a brand new CPU architecture for desktop and server, and some surprising developments on the iGPU front. Oh, and they mentioned that whole discrete GPU thing…

3D Stacking for Logic Chips

First we have Foveros, a new 3D packaging technology that follows Intel’s previous EMIB (Embedded Multi-die Interconnect Bridge) 2D packaging technology and enables die-stacking of high-performance logic chips for the first time.

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“Foveros paves the way for devices and systems combining high-performance, high-density and low-power silicon process technologies. Foveros is expected to extend die stacking beyond traditional passive interposers and stacked memory to high-performance logic, such as CPU, graphics and AI processors for the first time.”

Foveros will allow for a new “chiplet” paradigm, as “I/O, SRAM, and power delivery circuits can be fabricated in a base die and high-performance logic chiplets are stacked on top”. This new approach would permit design elements to be “mixed and matched”, and allow new device form-factors to be realized as products can be broken up into these smaller chiplets.

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The first range of products using this technology are expected to launch in the second half of 2019, beginning with a product that Intel states “will combine a high-performance 10nm compute-stacked chiplet with a low-power 22FFL base die,” which Intel says “will enable the combination of world-class performance and power efficiency in a small form factor”.

Intel Sunny Cove Processors - Coming Late 2019

Next up is the announcement of a brand new CPU architecture with Sunny Cove, which will be the basis of Intel’s next generation Core and Xeon processors in 2019. No mention of 10nm was made, so it is unclear if Intel’s planned transition from 14nm is happening with this launch (the last Xeon roadmap showed a 10 nm transition with "Ice Lake" in 2020).

Intel_CPUs.jpg

Intel states that Sonny Cove is “designed to increase performance per clock and power efficiency for general purpose computing tasks” with new features included “to accelerate special purpose computing tasks like AI and cryptography”.

Intel provided this list of Sunny Cove’s features:

  • Enhanced microarchitecture to execute more operations in parallel.
  • New algorithms to reduce latency.
  • Increased size of key buffers and caches to optimize data-centric workloads.
  • Architectural extensions for specific use cases and algorithms. For example, new performance-boosting instructions for cryptography, such as vector AES and SHA-NI,  and other critical use cases like compression and decompression.

Integrated Graphics with 2x Performance

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Intel slide image via ComputerBase

Intel did reveal next-gen graphics, though it was a new generation of the company’s integrated graphics announced at the event. The update is nonetheless significant, with the upcoming Gen11 integrated GPU “expected to double the computing performance-per-clock compared to Intel Gen9 graphics” thanks to a huge increase in Execution Units, from 24 EUs with Gen9 to 64 EUs with Gen11. This will provide “>1 TFLOPS performance capability”, according to Intel, who states that the new Gen11 graphics are also expected to feature advanced media encode/decode, supporting “4K video streams and 8K content creation in constrained power envelopes”.

And finally, though hardly a footnote, the new Gen11 graphics will feature Intel Adaptive Sync technology, which was a rumored feature of upcoming discrete GPU products from Intel.

Discrete GPUs?

And now for that little part about discrete graphics: At the event Intel simply “reaffirmed its plan to introduce a discrete graphics processor by 2020”. Nothing new here, and this obviously means that we won’t be seeing a new discrete GPU from Intel in 2019 - though the beefed-up Gen11 graphics should provide a much needed boost to Intel’s graphics offering when Sonny Cove launches “late next year”.

Source: Intel

Huawei Announces Kirin 980: Is the World's First 7nm SoC Passing Snapdragon?

Subject: Processors, Mobile | September 2, 2018 - 11:45 AM |
Tagged: SoC, octa-core, mobile, Mali-G76, Kirin, Huawei, HiSilicon, gpu, cpu, Cortex-A76, arm, 8-core

Huawei has introduced their subsidiary HiSilicon’s newest mobile processor in the Kirin 980, which, along with Huawei's claim of the world's first commercial 7nm SoC, is the first SoC to use Arm Cortex A76 CPU cores and Arm’s Mali G76 GPU.

KIRIN_980.PNG

Image credit: The Verge

Huawei is aiming squarely at Qualcomm with this announcement, claiming better performance than a Snapdragon 845 during the presentation. One of its primary differences to the current Snapdragon is the composition of the Kirin 980’s eight CPU cores, notable as the usual 'big.LITTLE' Arm CPU core configuration for an octa-core design gives way to a revised organization with three groups, as illustrated by AnandTech here:

K980.png

Image credit: AnandTech

Of the four Cortex A76 cores just two are clocked up to maximize performance with certain applications such as gaming (and, likely, benchmarks) at 2.60 GHz, and the other two are used more generally as more efficient performance cores at 1.92 GHz. The remaining four A55 cores operate at 1.80 GHz, and are used for lower-performance tasks. A full breakdown of the CPU core configuration as well as slides from the event are available at AnandTech.

Huawei claims that the improved CPU in the Kirin 980 results in "75 percent more powerful and 58 percent more efficient compared to their previous generation" (the Kirin 970). This claim translates into what Huawei claims to be 37% better performance and 32% greater efficiency than Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845.

980_SD.jpg

Image credit: AnandTech

The GPU also gets a much-needed lift this year from Arm's latest GPU, the Mali-G76, which features "new, wider execution engines with double the number of lanes" and "provides dramatic uplifts in both performance and efficiency for complex graphics and Machine Learning (ML) workloads", according to Arm.

mali_g76.jpg

Image credit: AnandTech

Real-world testing with shipping handsets is needed to verify Huawei's performance claims, of course. In fact, the results shown by Huawei at the presentation carry a this disclaimer, sourced from today’s press release:

"The specifications of Kirin 980 does not represent the specifications of the phone using this chip. All data and benchmark results are based on internal testing. Results may vary in different environments."

The upcoming Mate 20 from Huawei will be powered by this new Kirin 980 - and could very well provide results consistent with the full potential of the new chip - and that is set for an official launch on October 16.

The full press release is available after the break.

Source: AnandTech

Report: Intel i7-8086K Anniversary Edition CPU Listed by Retailers

Subject: Processors | May 30, 2018 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: VideoCardz, rumor, report, processor, Intel, history, cpu, anniversary edition, 8086K, 8086

The 40th anniversary of the original Intel 8086 microprocessor launch is just days away (June 8), and ahead of this VideoCardz.com has posted screen captures of online listings for the rumored 8086 anniversary CPU - the Core i7-8086K.

VideoCardz_8080K_Screens.png

(Screen captures above sourced from VideoCardz.com)

From VideoCardz.com:

"Some retailers have already started listing the new SKU on their websites, indicating 70 USD/EUR premium over i7-8700K (~480/470 EUR). Not much is known at this point, but the CPU is rumored to be 5.0 GHz chip out of the box. It is, however, still expected to be a 6-core SKU."

Beyond the online retailer listings accidentally posted early, presumably, not much is known; though it seems fair to conclude that this may indeed be a higher-clocked version of the current i7-8700K and would therefore remain a 6-core/12-thread product. Intel is going to be at Computex beginning June 5 where they "will showcase how the company is powering the future of computing" so might we hear an announcement of a new product on the eve of the 8086 anniversary? The possibility is too logical to ignore.

Source: VideoCardz

Intel Responds to Reboot Issues with Meltdown and Spectre Updates

Subject: Processors | January 18, 2018 - 01:17 PM |
Tagged: update, spectre, security, restart, reboot, processor, patch, meltdown, Intel, cpu

The news will apparently get worse before it gets any better for Intel, as the company updated their security recommendations for the Spectre/Meltdown patches for affected CPUs to address post-patch system restart issues. Specifically, Intel notes that issues may be introduced in some configurations with the current patches, though the company does not recommend discontinued use of such updates:

" Intel recommends that these partners, at their discretion, continue development and release of updates with existing microcode to provide protection against these exploits, understanding that the current versions may introduce issues such as reboot in some configurations".

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Image credit: HotHardware

The recommendation section of the security bulletin, updated yesterday (January 17, 2018), is reproduced below:

  • Intel has made significant progress in our investigation into the customer reboot sightings that we confirmed publicly last week
  • Intel has reproduced these issues internally and has developed a test method that allows us to do so in a predictable manner
  • Initial sightings were reported on Broadwell and Haswell based platforms in some configurations. During due diligence we determined that similar behavior occurs on other products including Ivy Bridge, Sandy Bridge, Skylake, and Kaby Lake based platforms in some configurations
  • We are working toward root cause
  • While our root cause analysis continues, we will start making beta microcode updates available to OEMs, Cloud service providers, system manufacturers and Software vendors next week for internal evaluation purposes
  • In all cases, the existing and any new beta microcode updates continue to provide protection against the exploit (CVE-2017-5715) also known as “Spectre Variant 2”
  • Variants 1 (Spectre) and Variant 3 (Meltdown) continue to be mitigated through system software changes from operating system and virtual machine vendors
  • As we gather feedback from our customers we will continue to provide updates that improve upon performance and usability

Intel recommendations to OEMs, Cloud service providers, system manufacturers and software vendors

  • Intel recommends that these partners maintain availability of existing microcode updates already released to end users. Intel does not recommend pulling back any updates already made available to end users
  • NEW - Intel recommends that these partners, at their discretion, continue development and release of updates with existing microcode to provide protection against these exploits, understanding that the current versions may introduce issues such as reboot in some configurations
  • NEW - We further recommend that OEMs, Cloud service providers, system manufacturers and software vendors begin evaluation of Intel beta microcode update releases in anticipation of definitive root cause and subsequent production releases suitable for end users

Intel recommendations to end users

  • Following good security practices that protect against malware in general will also help protect against possible exploitation until updates can be applied
  • For PCs and Data Center infrastructure, Intel recommends that patches be applied as soon as they are available from your system manufacturer, and software vendors
  • For data center infrastructure, Intel additionally recommends that IT administrators evaluate potential impacts from the reboot issue and make decisions based on the security profile of the infrastructure

Intel has worked with operating system vendors, equipment manufacturers, and other ecosystem partners to develop software updates that can help protect systems from these methods. End users and systems administrators should check with their operating system vendors and apply any available updates as soon as practical.

The full list of affected processors from Intel's security bulletin follows:

  • Intel® Core™ i3 processor (45nm and 32nm)
  • Intel® Core™ i5 processor (45nm and 32nm)
  • Intel® Core™ i7 processor (45nm and 32nm)
  • Intel® Core™ M processor family (45nm and 32nm)
  • 2nd generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • 4th generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • 5th generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • 6th generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • 7th generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • 8th generation Intel® Core™ processors
  • Intel® Core™ X-series Processor Family for Intel® X99 platforms
  • Intel® Core™ X-series Processor Family for Intel® X299 platforms
  • Intel® Xeon® processor 3400 series
  • Intel® Xeon® processor 3600 series
  • Intel® Xeon® processor 5500 series
  • Intel® Xeon® processor 5600 series
  • Intel® Xeon® processor 6500 series
  • Intel® Xeon® processor 7500 series
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E3 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E3 v2 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E3 v3 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E3 v4 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E3 v5 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E3 v6 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E5 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E5 v2 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E5 v3 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E5 v4 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E7 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E7 v2 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E7 v3 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor E7 v4 Family
  • Intel® Xeon® Processor Scalable Family
  • Intel® Xeon Phi™ Processor 3200, 5200, 7200 Series
  • Intel® Atom™ Processor C Series
  • Intel® Atom™ Processor E Series
  • Intel® Atom™ Processor A Series
  • Intel® Atom™ Processor x3 Series
  • Intel® Atom™ Processor Z Series
  • Intel® Celeron® Processor J Series
  • Intel® Celeron® Processor N Series
  • Intel® Pentium® Processor J Series
  • Intel® Pentium® Processor N Series

We await further updates and developments from Intel, system integrators, and motherboard partners.

Source: Intel

CES 2018: AMD Drops Ryzen CPU Prices By Up to 30 Percent

Subject: Processors | January 8, 2018 - 12:00 AM |
Tagged: Threadripper, ryzen, processor, price cut, cpu, CES 2018, CES, amd

AMD announced today a price drop for most of its Ryzen processor lineup, making the company's multi-core-focused parts even more competitive to Intel in terms of cost-to-performance. While not every Ryzen and Threadripper processor is seeing a price reduction, many parts are being reduced by up to 30 percent.

Processor Cores/Threads Previous SEP New SEP Percent Reduction
Threadripper 1950X 16/32 $999 $999 N/A
Threadripper 1920X 12/24 $799 $799 N/A
Threadripper 1900X 8/16 $549 $449 -18.2%
Ryzen 7 1800X 8/16 $499 $349 -30.1%
Ryzen 7 1700X 8/16 $399 $309 -22.5%
Ryzen 7 1700 8/16 $329 $299 -9.1%
Ryzen 5 1600X 6/12 $249 $219 -12.0%
Ryzen 5 1600 6/12 $219 $189 -13.7%
Ryzen 5 1500X 4/8 $189 $174 -7.9%
Ryzen 5 2400G 4/8   $169 N/A
Ryzen 3 1300X 4/4 $129 $129 N/A
Ryzen 3 2200G 4/4   $99 N/A

Note also in the price chart the new "G" series Ryzen APUs with integrated Radeon Vega graphics. Check pcper.com for more info on this new part.

Some of the new prices are already reflected, and in some cases reduced further, at retailers like Amazon.

To determine the new prices, AMD performed comparative price testing with its online retail partners last quarter, and determined that these new prices were the best balance between performance and value.

With second generation Ryzen processors not scheduled to launch until later this spring, the price drop not only helps AMD move existing inventory, it also keeps the company at the top of enthusiasts' minds in the midst of the fallout around the recent processor security issues, one of which primarily affects Intel processors.

Source: