Computex 2017: Lian-Li Launching AIO Liquid Coolers With Raw Copper Radiators

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 3, 2017 - 06:01 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, Lian-Li, LCS, copper radiator, copper, computex, cinsys, AIO

Guru3D made an interesting find at Lian-Li's Computex booth this year where they managed to take photos of a new all in one (AIO) liquid cooler that sports an all copper loop. Specifically, the company was showing off a new Lian-Li branded liquid cooler from Cinsys with a 240mm radiator. The "X-R240 Expandable water cooling heat radiating system" features a raw copper radiator surrounded by a metal shroud (reportedly aluminum) that houses 120mm fan mounts and a pump, large removable tubing, and a thin nickel plated copper CPU water block.

Lian-Li 240mm AIO Copper Cooler.jpg

Lian-Li X-R240 expandable water cooler. (Image credit: Guru3D)

Looking at the photos from Guru3D, the Lian-Li X-R240 AIO certainly looks classy and should perform fairly well with the copper block and copper radiator (which is nice to see in an AIO where aluminum is common). The large tubing appears to be fairly long enabling the radiator to be placed up to or in the front of a mid-tower case, though I am curious how flexible it will be in a smaller case in tight quarters (if I am remembering my watercooling correctly, the larger diameter should mean it will be less likely to kink though). Further, it looks like the tubing is removable and users will be able to expand the loop to add additional blocks and/or radiators which is nice though you should be careful to avoid adding non-copper (aluminum/silver/ect) components to the Lian-Li loop. Angled and/or swivel barbs on the CPU blocks would have been nice as well since the straight barbs on the thin CPU block could make installation more difficult.

The raw copper is a nice aesthetic touch, though once it is installed in your case and sitting behind fans it is going to be hard to see and Guru3D does note that over time the copper will oxidize and discolor. Still, it might be useful for modders to get that steam punk look and feel. Thankfully it looks like there is plastic (and maybe foam) separating the copper radiator from the aluminum shell/shroud though it's less of an issue since the outside of the radiator isn't going to be submerged in water (hopefully!).

The company will reportedly be releasing other models beyond the 240mm shown at Computex presumably by the same OEM (Cinsys). A 360mm radiator and some GPU blocks would be nice to see! Hopefully Morry or Sebastian can get one in for testing soon!

What are your thoughts on Lian-Li using raw copper? Do you prefer plated copper?

Source: Guru3D

Aqua Computer Starts Selling a Full Cover Water Block for AMD's R9 Nano Graphics Card

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 16, 2015 - 06:29 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, kryographics, GPU Water Block, copper, aqua computer

AMD officially launched its R9 Nano graphics card last week, and aftermarket coolers are already starting to ship. German-based Aqua Computer is the first company to offer a custom cooler for AMD’s pint-sized powerhouse. The Kryographics R9 Nano is a full cover water block that takes the already tiny card to a single slot design.

Aqua Computer Kryographics R9 Nano Full Cover Water Block Plexiglass.jpg

The Kryographics R9 Nano cooler is a machined copper block that covers the entire PCB and is paired to the VRMs using thermal pads and the GPU (and HBM) using thermal compound. The single slot cooler comes in two options including a see-through translucent ruby colored acrylic glass variant and a version with a brushed stainless steel top cover. In all cases, the block itself is all copper with microchannels over the GPU portion.

The cooler uses standard G1/4 threading on the ports and is compatible with CrossFire multi-GPU watercooled setups by removing the terminating screws and adding ports on the oppposite side of the card..

According to Aqua Computer, the Kryographics cooler was able to keep the R9 Nano GPU under 35 degrees C throughout their testing using Furmark. It will be interesting to see if the new cooler would allow the chips to maintain higher clockspeeds, especially with the power target maxed out in CCC. The need to fit a radiator, pump, and tubing in the case does while still needing to use a Nano (in lieu of a Fury X) makes this a niche within a niche product, but I’m sure some enthusiast will find a use for it!

Aqua Computer Kryographics R9 Nano Full Cover Water Block.jpg

The Kryographics R9 Nano is available for purchase now (though there is currently a shipping delay of 10 days). The base version without the see-through window has an MSRP of 89.90 EUR while the Kryographics Acrylic Glass Edition has a slight premium at 99.90 EUR. (At the time of writing, that pricing works out to about $102 and $113 USD respectively.)

Graphene coated copper shows significant promise

Subject: General Tech | June 19, 2015 - 01:00 PM |
Tagged: graphene, copper, interconnect

Earlier this week we heard news about IBM's research into optical transceiver chips and today comes news at The Register of another interesting project to increase the frequency of processors by sheathing current copper interconnects in graphene.  This is not the first time the usage of graphene has been investigated for computers, indeed there is research being conducted into improving non-volatile storage and even cooling with the use of graphene. The project being carried out by a team at Stanford University found graphene-coated interconnects can reliably carry data at speeds 4-17% faster than copper without the sheathing.  They feel that a 30% improvement is reachable with current process technology; you can read more in the full article.

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"Researchers have made tremendous advances on all of the other components in chips but recently, there hasn't been much progress on improving the performance of the wires," said Stanford electrical engineer Philip Wong."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Dell uses ARM-based "Copper" servers to accelerate ecosystem

Subject: Processors, Systems | May 29, 2012 - 05:15 PM |
Tagged: server, dell, copper, arm

Dell announced today that is going to help enable the world of the ARM-based server ecosystem by enabling key hyperscale customers to access and develop on Dell's own "Copper" ARM servers.

Dell today announced it is responding to the demands of our customers for continued innovation in support of hyperscale environments, and enabling the ecosystem for ARM-based servers. The ARM-based server market is approaching an inflection point, marked by increasing customer interest in testing and developing applications, and Dell believes now is the right time to help foster development and testing of operating systems and applications for ARM servers.

Dell is recognized as an industry leader in both the x86 architecture and the hyperscale server market segments. Dell began testing ARM server technology internally in 2010 in response to increasing customer demands for density and power efficiency, and worked closely with select Dell Data Center Solutions (DCS) hyperscale customers to understand their interest level and expectations for ARM-based servers. Today's announcement is a natural extension of Dell's server leadership and the company's continued focus on delivering next generation technology innovation.

While these servers are still not publicly available, Dell is fostering the development of software and verification processes by seeding these unique servers to a select few groups.  PC Perspective is NOT one of them.

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Each of these 3U rack mount machines includes 48 independent servers, each based around a 1.6 GHz quad-core Marvell Armada XP SoC.  Each of the sleds (pictured below) holds four discrete server nodes, each capable of as much as 8GB of memory on a single DDR3 UDIMM.  Each node can access one 2.5-in HDD bay and one Gigabit Ethernet connection.

dell_copper_sled.jpg

Click for a larger view

Even though we are still very early into the life cycle of ARM architectures in the server room, Dell claims that these systems are built perfectly for web front-ends and Hadoop environments:

Customers have expressed great interest in understanding ARM-based server advantages and how they may apply to their hyperscale environments. Dell believes ARM infrastructures demonstrate promise for web front-end and Hadoop environments, where advantages in performance per dollar and performance per watt are critical. The ARM server ecosystem is still developing, and largely available in open-source, non-production versions, and the current focus is on supporting development of that ecosystem. Dell has designed its programs to support today's market realities by providing lightweight, high-performance seed units and easy remote access to development clusters.

There is little doubt that Intel will feel and address this competition in the coming years.

Source: Marketwatch