Google Chrome 73 Getting Media Keys Support

Subject: General Tech | February 11, 2019 - 08:20 PM |
Tagged: media keys, google, chrome

While the desktop version of Google Chrome has just been updated to 72, the next version, 73, will allow websites to bind JavaScript events to media keys. This means that websites will be able to listen to those buttons and respond accordingly, even if Google Chrome is a background application. Some websites should support this immediately, because it was already available on mobile, although I am not sure which ones and how.

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Image Credit: Google

The update should be useful to those of us who, for example, listen to YouTube playlists. I am curious what sort of controls Google will add to tune its behavior. For instance, I probably do not want to close every old YouTube tab that I have laying around just so I can use Spotify in peace.

The feature will be added to Chrome OS, macOS, and Windows. Linux users will need to wait a little bit for some reason.

Source: Google

Chrome browser is hungry!

Subject: General Tech | February 6, 2019 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: chrome, google, Chromium Gerrit

Chrome developers are working to end one of the internet's long standing gags, that of Chrome munching every bit of RAM it can get it's hands on.  The Chromium Gerrit project is in very early days and we don't have much information on it all except that they are working to develop a version of Chrome which "sets budgets for certain resource types".  The idea being that when you stop interacting with a page or tab, Chrome will stop large scripts from running until you start using that tab again. 

In theory this should provide a way to reduce the amount of system resources an idle page gobbles up, and The Inquirer, among others, hopes this will be more effective that current add-ons designed to do this.  With Microsoft intending to move Edge to Chromium, this will benefit quite a few people if ever successfully implemented.

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"Full details are held on an unreleased design document, and we're far too early for even the Canary channel users to be seeing it in the wild - it may never happen at all, though it's very much hoped that it will."

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Source: The Inquirer

Chrome plated Windows? Microsoft is making like a magpie

Subject: General Tech | December 4, 2018 - 02:38 PM |
Tagged: Project Anaheim, microsoft, rumours, chrome, chromium, arm, alphabet

There are two very interesting rumours about Microsoft circulating the intertubes today, both involving Alphabet's Chrome products.  The most shocking is that they have finally internalized the fact that when people refer to Edge as "the one you use to download Chrome with", they are not kidding.  This has lead to the possibility that they may be designing a Chromium-based browser, under the moniker Project Anaheim, to replace Edge as their embedded browser.  They have been trying to get Chrome add-ins to work on Edge with little success, so this would certainly resolve that, unless they intend to focus on making Windows Store apps work with Chrome.

The second rumour signals another big internal change, though in some ways it is less shocking than the previous rumour.  Via Slashdot we have heard more details on Windows Lite, which will replace products like Windows 10 S and RT.  It will be able to run on any processor, up to and including Qualcomm and other ARM based processors and is likely targeting the same market as Chromebooks currently do.  It looks to have a new GUI built off of the mysterious Windows Core OS.  Follow the link for more info on Windows Lite as well as Andromeda, which is not dead yet.

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" As we've previously told you, Microsoft is already working on Chromium in order to help Google port it over to ARM-based Windows machines, such is the power that the world's top browser holds. "

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Source: The Inquirer

Chalk up another one for Chromebooks

Subject: General Tech | November 30, 2018 - 05:42 PM |
Tagged: pixel slate, google, chrome

The new Pixel Slate has an impressive 12.3", 3000x2000, 293ppi touchscreen, powered by the UHD 615 GPU on the Core i5-8200Y.  You will also find 8GB and a 128GB SSD, what you will not find is Thunderbolt on the 2 USB-C ports nor a headphone jack.  You do pay for the components and design, a Slate with those specs will cost you $1000.  Ars Technica were impressed by the Chromebook, especially the inclusion of fingerprint authentication.

Check it out here.

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"The Pixel Slate may not share a silver-and-white aesthetic with the Pixelbook, but it still has a clean design, now just with a darker hue. The all-metal back sports a deep navy color with a slightly lighter blue "G" on the top-left corner."

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Source: Ars Technica

Chrome's anonym-ish incognito mode

Subject: General Tech | August 23, 2018 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: chrome, google, incognito, obvious

To cut straight to the chase, if you are browsing anonymously and log into one of your accounts, you are no longer anonymous; a seemingly obvious fact which is making headlines today.  A Google rep feels this is being pushed by Oracle who are hoping to turn public opinion against Google, though how that would affect their ongoing legal battles is unclear.  The timing is rather unfortunate as the publics opinion of Google plummeted after being reminded that Google Maps always knows where you are if you have it installed. 

The Inquirer does remind us what is worth getting upset about; Google's unsubstantiated claim that they offer tools to prevent their products from tracking you and a way to delete your entire history. 

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"A researcher from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee found that although the data collected appears to be anonymised, in reality, Google can retroactively identify it from the usernames and other account data used during the session."

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Source: The Inquirer

Spectre doesn't stand a ghost of a chance on the new Chrome, nor will your available RAM

Subject: General Tech | July 12, 2018 - 02:10 PM |
Tagged: chrome, security, spectre

Chrome's predilection for gobbling up vast amounts of RAM will soon increase to new levels but it is for a very good reason.  Chrome 67 will offer a Site Isolation feature which will protect you against a variety of Spectre attacks.   When you have this feature enabled in Chrome each site would be isolated, with the a single renderer process per page.  This means coss-site iframes and pop-ups will be unable to read data from other pages; in fact a single site may spawn multiple render processes, each running in isolation.

There is of course a cost, The Inquirer was quoted an increase of 10-13% in RAM usage ... so better get a 128GB kit.

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"The new feature basically splits the render process into separate tasks using out-of-process iframes, which makes it difficult for speculative execution exploits like Spectre to snoop on data."

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Source: The Inquirer

Mozilla, Opera, and Google Pull Malicious Extension

Subject: General Tech | July 6, 2018 - 09:12 PM |
Tagged: Opera, mozilla, google, firefox, chrome

I don’t think this should surprise anyone, but it’s good to report on none-the-less. There was a popular browser extension, called Stylish, that allowed users to customize the pages that they visit, and share those customizations with their friends. It’s a cool concept, but it was later sold to another company. That new owner changed the extension to monitor its users.

Mozilla, Opera, and Google slapped it across the jaw with a banhammer.

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If you go to Mozilla’s Firefox Add-ons site, Opera's Add-ons site, or Google’s Chrome Web Store, you will get a 404. If you already installed the extension, it will be removed from your browser. As such, you probably don’t need to worry about it, because the browser vendors went DEFCON 1 on it.

But just in case you haven’t yet got the kill signal (because you’re behind a limited VPN or something) be sure to remove “Stylish” from your browser.

This also raises the point about curated app stores: review isn't perfect. Sometimes malicious software can go unnoticed for years. It's best not to get too complacent.

Source: Sophos

Google versus the law of unintended consequences

Subject: General Tech | May 16, 2018 - 01:21 PM |
Tagged: google, alphabet, chrome, ads

Killing off autoplaying adverts in Chrome is a wonderful thing and has brought peace and quiet to many a browsing session, unless you are someone who likes to play games in your browser.  It seems some games are not functioning properly, even after being whitelisted and so in the new version Google will be rolling back that change to give devs time to change how their games work.  This likely means a fair amount of games are about to be abandoned as Google does not intend to change how their block works but are instead putting the onus on the devs to change the code on their free to play games.  The Inquirer links to the Chromium blog so you can get the news straight from the horse's mouth.

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"GOOGLE HAS been forced to roll back its new autoplay policy for web video in Chrome after it became apparent that it was borking legitimate content."

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Source: The Inquirer

Chrome offers a more peaceful web

Subject: General Tech | February 14, 2018 - 12:47 PM |
Tagged: chrome, ad blocker

On Feb 15th Chrome will push out an update which will enable ad filtering on the popular web browser.  They will not take this to the extremes of many ad blocker or script filtering add-ins but instead will block ads which do not conform to the guidelines of the Coalition for Better Ads.  That would mean full page ads with a timer to prevent you from accessing the page until it hits zero, ones with autoplaying audio, pop ups and flashing ads

There will likely be some unintended consequences, as various text editors have pop ups to recover data and there are sites where you want autoplaying content so we shall see how Chrome modifies their ad filter over time.  This is good news for websites as it does not completely prevent ad revenue, only encourages the owners to ensure the ads they allow to be displayed follow certain guidelines.   Pop by Slashdot if you want to join in their reasoned and informed discussion about tomorrows update.

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"Chrome's ad filtering is designed to weed out some of the web's most annoying ads, and push website owners to stop using them. Google is not planning to wipe out all ads from Chrome, just ones that are considered bad using standards from the Coalition for Better Ads. Full page ads, ads with autoplaying sound and video, and flashing ads will be targeted by Chrome's ad filtering, which will hopefully result in less of these annoying ads on the web."

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Source: Slashdot

Cryptonight mining with Chrome

Subject: General Tech | October 24, 2017 - 01:14 PM |
Tagged: cryptonight, chrome, mining, security

Have you noticed your Chrome sessions are using a lot more CPU power now than they used to and you have installed the Short URL (goo.gl) extension recently?  Congratulations, you are a cryptocurrency miner!  It seems some ne'r-do-well managed to infect the server which provides that app with a mining program called Cryptonight which enlists your browser into mining XMR coins.  For now your best bet is to uninstall that application if you have it installed; it has been removed from Google Play if you do not.  The Register has a bit more information on Cryptonight as well as some history on similar browser miners here.

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"Another Chrome extension has been found secretly harboring a cryptocurrency miner – and it appears this issue is going to get worse before it gets better."

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Source: The Register