Manufacturer: Overclock.net

Yes, We're Writing About a Forum Post

Update - July 19th @ 7:15pm EDT: Well that was fast. Futuremark published their statement today. I haven't read it through yet, but there's no reason to wait to link it until I do.

Update 2 - July 20th @ 6:50pm EDT: We interviewed Jani Joki, Futuremark's Director of Engineering, on our YouTube page. The interview is embed just below this update.

Original post below

The comments of a previous post notified us of an Overclock.net thread, whose author claims that 3DMark's implementation of asynchronous compute is designed to show NVIDIA in the best possible light. At the end of the linked post, they note that asynchronous compute is a general blanket, and that we should better understand what is actually going on.

amd-mantle-queues.jpg

So, before we address the controversy, let's actually explain what asynchronous compute is. The main problem is that it actually is a broad term. Asynchronous compute could describe any optimization that allows tasks to execute when it is most convenient, rather than just blindly doing them in a row.

I will use JavaScript as a metaphor. In this language, you can assign tasks to be executed asynchronously by passing functions as parameters. This allows events to execute code when it is convenient. JavaScript, however, is still only single threaded (without Web Workers and newer technologies). It cannot run callbacks from multiple events simultaneously, even if you have an available core on your CPU. What it does, however, is allow the browser to manage its time better. Many events can be delayed until the browser renders the page, it performs other high-priority tasks, or until the asynchronous code has everything it needs, like assets that are loaded from the internet.

mozilla-architecture.jpg

This is asynchronous computing.

However, if JavaScript was designed differently, it would have been possible to run callbacks on any available thread, not just the main thread when available. Again, JavaScript is not designed in this way, but this is where I pull the analogy back into AMD's Asynchronous Compute Engines. In an ideal situation, a graphics driver will be able to see all the functionality that a task will require, and shove them down an at-work GPU, provided the specific resources that this task requires are not fully utilized by the existing work.

Read on to see how this is being implemented, and what the controversy is.

RetroArch Announces Vulkan API Support (& Async Compute)

Subject: General Tech | July 16, 2016 - 06:58 PM |
Tagged: n64, dolphin, libretro, retroarch, vulkan, async shaders, asynchronous compute, amd

While the Dolphin emulator has a lot of mind share, and recently announced DirectX 12 support, they have only just recently discussed working on the open alternative, Vulkan. It looks like the LibRetro developer community will beat them with an update to RetroArch and the LibRetro API. The page for RetroArch 1.3.5 exists as of (according to Google) yesterday, but 404s, so it should be coming soon. It is still in experimental mode, but it's better than nothing.

retroarch-2016-plain-logo.png

Interestingly, they also claim that their Vulkan port of Angrylion makes use of asynchronous compute. It's unclear what it uses that for, but I'm sure it will make for interesting benchmarks.

This is your AMD APU. This is your AMD APU on DX12; any questions?

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 29, 2016 - 07:09 PM |
Tagged: amd, dx12, async shaders

Earlier in the month [H]ard|OCP investigated the performance scaling that Intel processors display in DX12, now they have finished their tests on AMD processors.  These tests include Async computing information, so be warned before venturing forth into the comments.  [H] tested an FX 8370 at 2GHz and 4.3GHz to see what effect this had on the games, the 3GHz tests did not add any value and were dropped in favour of these two turbo frequencies.  There are some rather interesting results and discussion, drop by for the details.

1460040024Wl2AHtuhmm_5_1.gif

"One thing that has been on our minds about the new DX12 API is its ability to distribute workloads better on the CPU side. Now that we finally have a couple of new DX12 games that have been released to test, we spend a bit of time getting to bottom of what DX12 might be able to do for you. And a couple sentences on Async Compute."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Podcast #365 - R9 Nano Preview, Tons of Skylake SKUs, Asynchronous Shaders and more!

Subject: General Tech | September 3, 2015 - 04:19 PM |
Tagged: Z170-A, video, skylake-u, Skylake, r9 nano, podcast, phanteks, Intel, ifa, g-sync, fury x, Fury, Fiji, dx12, async shaders, asus, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #365 - 09/03/2015

Join us this week as we discuss the R9 Nano Preview, Tons of Skylake SKUs, Asynchronous Shaders and more!

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Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano and Sebastian Peak

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