AMD Ryzen Mobile Picasso APUs Spotted in Benchmark Results

Subject: Processors | December 19, 2018 - 08:47 PM |
Tagged: Zen+, ryzen mobile, ryzen, rumor, picasso, geekbench, amd

Twitter user APISAK is at it again with more hardware leaks, and this time the rumors surround AMD's next generation mobile 3000U-series "Picasso" APUs which will replace Raven Ridge in 2019. The new APUs were reportedly spotted by APISAK (@TUM_APISAK on Twitter) as reported by Hexus in two HP laptops in 14" and 17" form factors and offer power efficiency and performance improvements over Raven Ridge's CPU cores along with Vega-based graphics. Searching around online and parsing the various conflicting rumors and speculation on Picasso, I think it is most likely that Picasso is 12nm and utilizes Zen+ CPU cores though it remains to be seen how true that is.

Ryzen Mobile AMD APUs.jpg

Based on previous roadmaps, AMD's APUs have trailed the desktop CPUs in process technology and architecture instead opting to refine the previous generation for mobile rather than operating at its bleeding edge so while 2019 will see Zen 2 architecture-based CPUs and GPUs built on 7nm, APUs in 2019 are likely to stick with 12nm and Zen+ tuned for a mobile power envelope with tweaks to SenseMI and technology like mobile XFR and dynamic power delivery.

In any event, Picasso APUs are rumored to include the Ryzen 3 3200U, Ryzen 3 3300U, and Ryzen 5 3500U based on Geekbench results pages as well as the low-end [Athlon?] 3000U and the high-end Ryzen 5 3700U - according to the source. The 3000U and 3700U are known in name only, but the middle-tier APUs have a bit more information available thanks to Geekbench. The Ryzen 3 3200U is a dual core (four thread) part while the Ryzen 3 3300U and Ryzen 5 3500U are quad core (eight thread) CPUs. All Picasso APUs are rumored to use Vega-based graphics. The dual core APU has the highest base clock at 2.6 Ghz while the 3300U and 3500U start at 2.1 GHz. The Ryzen 5 3700U allegedly clocks from 2.2 GHz to 3.8 GHz and likely has the highest boost clock of the bunch. The parts use the FP5 mobile socket.

Picasso APU Geekbench scores based on HP Laptop 17-ca1xxx except 3200U Compute which is from HP Laptop 14-cm1xxx. Carrizo APU scores based on HP Pavilion. The i5-8359U CPU scores are from. HP Elitebook X360 and Compute score from Dell Latitude 7490.
  Athlon(?) 3000U Ryzen 3 3200U Ryzen 3 3300U Ryzen 5 3500U Ryzen 5 3700U A10-8700P (Carrizo) Intel Core i5-8359U
Cores / Threads ? 2 / 4 4 / 4 4 / 8 4 / 8 2 / 4 4 / 8
Base / Boost Clocks ? 2.6 / ? GHz 2.1 / ? GHz 2.1 / ? GHz 2.2 / 3.8 GHz 1.8 / 3.19 GHz 1.9 / 3.59 GHz
Cache ? 4 MB 4 MB 4 MB 4 MB 2 MB 6 MB
Graphics Vega Vega 3 6 CU (920 MHz) Vega 6 6 CU (1.2 GHz) Vega 8 8 CU (1.2 GHz) Vega R6 6 CUs (GCN 1.2) UHD 620 24 CUs (1.1 GHz)
Socket FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP4 1356 FCBGA
Geekbench Single Core ? 3467 3654 3870 ? 2113 4215
Geekbench Multi Core ? 6735 9686 11284 ? 4328 12768
Geekbench Graphics ? 23698 26540 31947 ? 20009 16279

Looking at the Geekbench results (which you should take with a grain of salt and as just an approximation because final scores would depend on the platform, cooling, and how it ends up clocking within its power envelope) it seems that AMD may have a decent chip on its hands that improves the performance over Raven Ridge a bit and significantly over its older Excavator-based pre-Zen designs. A cursory comparison with Kaby Lake shows that AMD is not quite to par in CPU performance (particularly per core but it comes close in multi-core) but offers notably better compute / GPU performance thanks to the Vega graphics. It seems that AMD is closing the gap at least with Zen+.

I am remaining skeptical but optimistic about AMD's Picasso APUs. I am looking forward to more information on the new chips and the devices that will use them. I am hoping that my educated guess is correct with regard to Picasso being 12nm Zen+ or better as rumor is mainly that Picasso is a Raven Ridge successor that offers power and performance tweaks without going into further detail. I expect more information on Picasso (APU) and Matisse (CPU) to come out as soon as next month at CES 2019.

What are your thoughts on Picasso?

Source: Hexus

JEDEC Updates HBM Standard with 24GB Capacity and Faster Speed

Subject: Graphics Cards, Memory | December 17, 2018 - 04:33 PM |
Tagged: Vega, radeon, JESD235, jedec, high bandwidth memory, hbm, DRAM, amd

In a press release today JEDEC has announced an update to the HBM standard, with potential implications for graphics cards utilizing the technology (such as an AMD Radeon Vega 64 successor, perhaps?).

"This update extends the per pin bandwidth to 2.4 Gbps, adds a new footprint option to accommodate the 16 Gb-layer and 12-high configurations for higher density components, and updates the MISR polynomial options for these new configurations."

HBM_Original.PNG

Original HBM graphic via AMD

The revised spec brings the JEDEC standard up to the level we saw with Samsung's "Aquabolt" HBM2 and its 307.2 GB/s per-stack bandwidth, but with 12-high TSV stacks (up from 8) which raises memory capacity from 8GB to a whopping 24GB per stack.

The full press release from JEDEC follows:

ARLINGTON, Va., USA – DECEMBER 17, 2018 – JEDEC Solid State Technology Association, the global leader in the development of standards for the microelectronics industry, today announced the publication of an update to JESD235 High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) DRAM standard.  HBM DRAM is used in Graphics, High Performance Computing, Server, Networking and Client applications where peak bandwidth, bandwidth per watt, and capacity per area are valued metrics to a solution’s success in the market.   The standard was developed and updated with support from leading GPU and CPU developers to extend the system bandwidth growth curve beyond levels supported by traditional discrete packaged memory.  JESD235B is available for download from the JEDEC website.

JEDEC standard JESD235B for HBM leverages Wide I/O and TSV technologies to support densities up to 24 GB per device at speeds up to 307 GB/s. This bandwidth is delivered across a 1024-bit wide device interface that is divided into 8 independent channels on each DRAM stack.  The standard can support 2-high, 4-high, 8-high, and 12-high TSV stacks of DRAM at full bandwidth to allow systems flexibility on capacity requirements from 1 GB – 24 GB per stack.

This update extends the per pin bandwidth to 2.4 Gbps, adds a new footprint option to accommodate the 16 Gb-layer and 12-high configurations for higher density components, and updates the MISR polynomial options for these new configurations.  Additional clarifications are provided throughout the document to address test features and compatibility across generations of HBM components.

Source: JEDEC

AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition Adds Mobile & VR Game Streaming, Performance Tuning

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 13, 2018 - 09:01 AM |
Tagged: Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition, radeon software, radeon, gpu, drivers, amd, Adrenalin Edition

AMD today released the latest major update to its Radeon software and driver suite. Building on the groundwork laid last year, AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition brings a number of new features and performance improvements.

amd-radeon-adrenalin-2019-edition.jpg

With this year’s software update, AMD continues to make significant gains in game performance compared to last year’s driver release, with an average gain of up to 15 percent in across a range of popular titles. Examples include Assassin’s Creed Odyssey (11%), Battlefield V (39%), and Shadow of the Tomb Raider (15%).

amd-adrenalin-2019-games.jpg

New Features

Beyond performance, Adrenalin 2019 Edition introduces a number of new and improved features. Highlights include:

Game Streaming: Radeon gamers can now stream any game or application from their PCs to their mobile devices via the AMD Link app at up to 4K 60fps. The feature supports both on-screen controls as well as Bluetooth controllers. ReLive streaming is also expanding to VR, with users able to stream games and videos from their PCs to standalone VR headsets via new AMD VR store apps. This includes Steam VR titles, allowing users to play high-quality PC-based VR games on select standalone headsets. AMD claims that its streaming technology offers “up to 44% faster responsiveness” than other game streaming solutions.

amd-adrenalin-2019-game-streaming.jpg

ReLive Streaming and Sharing: Gamers more interested in streaming their games to other people will find several new features in AMD’s ReLive feature, including adjustable picture-in-picture instant replays from 5 to 30 seconds, automatic GIF creation, and a new scene editor with more stream overlay options and hotkey-based scene transition control.

Radeon Game Advisor: A new overlay available in-game that helps users designate their target experience (performance vs. quality) and then recommends game-specific settings to achieve that target. Since the tool is running live alongside the game, it can respond to changes as they occur and dynamically recommend updated settings and options.

amd-adrenalin-2019-game-advisor.jpg

Radeon Settings Advisor: A new tool in the Radeon Software interface that scans system configuration and settings and recommends changes (e.g., enabling or disabling Radeon Chill, changing the display refresh rate, enabling HDR) to achieve an optimal gaming experience.

WattMan One-Click Tuning Improvements: Radeon WattMan now supports automatic tuning of memory overclocking, GPU undervolting, expanded fan control options, and unlocked DPM states for RX Vega series cards.

Display Improvements: FreeSync 2 can now tone-map HDR content to look better on displays that don’t support the full color and contrast of the HDR spec, and AMD’s Virtual Super Resolution feature is now supported on ultra-wide displays.

amd-adrenalin-2019-freesync2-hdr.jpg

Radeon Overlay: AMD’s Overlay feature which allows gamers to access certain Radeon features without leaving their game has been updated to display system performance metrics, WattMan configuration options, Radeon Enhanced Sync controls, and the aforementioned Game Advisor.

amd-adrenalin-2019-amd-link-voice-control.jpg

AMD Link: AMD’s mobile companion app now offers easier setup via QR code scanning, voice control of various Radeon and ReLive settings (e.g., start/stop streaming, save replay, take screenshot), WattMan controls, enhanced performance metrics, and the ability to initiate a Radeon Software update.

Availability

Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition is available now from AMD’s support website for all supported AMD GPUs.

Source: AMD

A break from your regular Intel briefing

Subject: General Tech | December 12, 2018 - 12:37 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2060, nvidia, navi, amd

The majority of today's news will cover Intel's wide range of announcements from their architecture day, with new Optane DIMMs seeking to reduce latency to come close to matching that of DRAM to Foveros chiplets and hints of coming in off the Lake to spend some time in a Sunny Cove.  Indeed there are more links below the fold offering more coverage as yesterdays announcements  were very dense.

That might overshadow a rumour which dedicated discrete GPUs lovers would be interested in, the fact that NVIDIA might be able to get the RTX 2060 to market before AMD can launch a Navi based card.  The Inquirer has seen rumours that NVIDIA might be able to release the card in the first half of 2019, while the 7nm Navi isn't expected until the second half of year.  The early supply of mid-range NVIDIA GPUs might attract buyers who no longer want to wait; though depending on how Navi performs they could come to regret that lack of patience. 

IMG_0401.JPG

"GRAPHICS CARDS IN 2019 are set to get a good bit more interesting, as a leak suggests that Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2060 could reach the market before AMD's next-gen Navi Radeon cards."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

Vega meets Radeon Pro

Professional graphics cards are a segment of the industry that can look strange to gamers and PC enthusiasts. From the outside, it appears that businesses are paying more for almost identical hardware when compared to their gaming counterparts from both NVIDIA and AMD. 

However, a lot goes into a professional-level graphics card that makes all the difference to the consumers they are targeting. From the addition of ECC memory to protect against data corruption, all the way to a completely different driver stack with specific optimizations for professional applications, there's a lot of work put into these particular products.

The professional graphics market has gotten particularly interesting in the last few years with the rise of the NVIDIA TITAN-level GPUs and "Frontier Edition" graphics cards from AMD. While lacking ECC memory, these new GPUs have brought over some of the application level optimizations, while providing a lower price for more hobbyist level consumers.

However, if you're a professional that depends on a graphics card for mission-critical work, these options are no replacement for the real thing.

Today we're looking at one of AMD's latest Pro graphics offerings, the AMD Radeon Pro WX 8200. 

DSC05271.JPG

Click here to continue reading our review of the AMD Radeon Pro WX 8200.

Report: New AMD Trademark Shows Possible 7nm Vega Logo

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 10, 2018 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: Vega, trademark, rumor, report, radeon, graphics, gpu, amd, 7nm

News of a new logo trademark from AMD is making the rounds, with VideoCardz.com spotting the image via Twitter user "BoMbY". Time to speculate!

Vega_II_Logo.jpg

AMD trademark image posted by Twitter user BoMbY (via VideoCardz.com)

The logo, with the familiar "V" joined by a couple of new stripes on the right side, could mean a couple of things; with a possible reference to Vega II (2), or perhaps the VII suggests the Roman numeral 7 for 7nm, instead? VideoCardz.com thinks the latter may be the case:

"AMD has registered a new trademark just 2 weeks ago. Despite many rumors floating around about Navi architecture and its possible early reveal or announcement in January, it seems that AMD is not yet done with Vega. The Radeon Vega logo, which features the distinctive V lettering, has now received 2 stripes, to indicate the 7nm die shrink."

Whatever the case may be it's interesting to consider the possibility of a 7nm Vega GPU before we see Navi. We really don't know, though it does seem a bit presumptuous to consider a new product as early as CES, as Tech Radar speculates:

"We know full well that the next generation of AMD graphics will be built upon a 7nm architecture going by the roadmaps the company released at CES 2018. At the same time, it seems to all sync up with AMD's plans to announce new 7nm GPUs at CES 2019, so it almost seems certain that we’ll see Vega II graphics cards soon."

The prospect of new graphics cards is always tantalizing, but we'll need more than a logo before things really get interesting.

Source: VideoCardz

Out on a branch, speculating about possible architectural flaws

Subject: General Tech | December 10, 2018 - 12:38 PM |
Tagged: spectre, splitspectre, speculator, security, arm, Intel, amd

The discovery of yet another variant of Spectre vulnerability is not good news for already exhausted security experts or reporters, but there is something new in this story which offers a glimmer of hope.  A collaborative team of researchers from Northeastern University and IBM found this newest design law using an automatic bug finding tool they designed, called Speculator.

They designed the tool to get around the largest hurdle security researchers face, the secrecy of AMD, Intel and ARM who are trying to keep the recipe for their special sauce secret, and rightly so.  Protecting their intellectual properly is paramount to their stockholders and there are arguments about the possible effectiveness of security thorough obscurity in protecting consumers from those with nefarious intent but it does come at a cost for those hunting bugs for good. 

Pop by The Register for details on how Speculator works.

TreeHouse_0002_20130603_web.jpg

"SplitSpectre is a proof-of-concept built from Speculator, the team's automated CPU bug-discovery tool, which the group plans to release as open-source software."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Nein, Zeneration 3 is best

Subject: General Tech | December 6, 2018 - 01:14 PM |
Tagged: amd, Zen 2, Ryzen 5 3600, Ryzen 3 3300, Ryzen 9 3800, leak, Ryzen 7 3700, Ryzen 3000

If the rumours The Inquirer are helping spread are true then AMD really does believe the third time's the charm.  The new series of Ryzen 3000 chips will use Zen 2 cores and will follow Intel's addition of a 9 series, though the quoted price of £400 for the Ryzen 9 3850X is a lot more attractive than Intel's pricing.  That chip will sport a 5.1GHz peak clock on its pair of Zen 2 dies with eight cores apiece, though the 135W TDP will need some taming. 

Check out the variety of other chips in the Ryzen 3, 5, and 7 families which have leaked out.

rm0zqapy_400x400.jpg

"The upcoming third-generation Ryzen chip, slated for release next year, will be based on Team Red's Zen 2 architecture, the successor to its rather successful Zen architecture found in Ryzen 1 and 2 CPUs and EPYC server processors."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Which is the most exciting Radeon RX 590?

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 3, 2018 - 04:48 PM |
Tagged: rx 590, amd, xfx, powercolor, sapphire, RX 590 Fatboy, RX 590 Special Edition, Red Devil AXRX 590

There are some who were completely unimpressed with the launch of the RX 590, but for those gaming at 1080p with about $300 in the bank, this is a decent upgrade path from a previous generation.  Legit Reviews put together a look at three different implementations of this card, from XFX, PowerColor and Sapphire.  Upgrading to one of these cards will allow you decent performance up to 1440p, if you have dreams up upgrading your display as well.

Which offers the best value for your money?  Read on to find out.

radeon-590-front-645x695.jpg

"The Radeon RX 590 is the latest and greatest mainstream graphics card from AMD and is targeted at targeted to 1080P gamers that want to play every game on the market today at respectable frame rates for under $300. You also get three PC games for free when you purchase the RX 590 (Devil May Cry 5, The Division 2, and Resident Evil 2) to help sweeten the deal. In our launch day review we looked at the XFX Radeon RX 590 Fatboy and have since gotten in the PowerColor Red Devil AXRX 590 as well as the Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX 590 Special Edition."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards