ASUS TUF Gaming FX505 and FX705DY Laptops Powered by AMD Ryzen 3000 Series

Subject: Systems | January 9, 2019 - 02:51 AM |
Tagged: ryzen, RX 560X, radeon, notebook, mobile, laptop, gaming, asus, amd

ASUS had a pair of AMD-powered gaming laptops to announce at CES 2019, with the TUF Gaming FX505 and FX705DY, both of which feature the latest Ryzen 3000-series mobile CPUs as well as discrete Radeon RX 560X graphics.

FX705DY_1.png

“Experience smoother, more immersive gameplay with the new ASUS TUF Gaming FX505 AMD Edition. Featuring a cutting-edge IPS-level NanoEdge display with AMD® FreeSync™ technology and a refresh rate up to 120Hz, and armed with the latest AMD Ryzen™ processor and discrete Radeon™ graphics, it delivers high-performance gaming at an affordable price. It’s also tested and certified to military-grade MIL-STD-810G standards, so you’re guaranteed toughness and durability that’s second to none.”

The CPU powering these systems is the AMD Ryzen 5 3550H, a 4-core/8-thread CPU with clock speeds ranging from 2.1 GHz up to 3.7 GHz and a 35W TDP.

"AMD’s Ryzen processors have taken desktops by storm, and TUF Gaming laptops lead the deployment of the newest version. Otherwise known as Picasso, this 2nd Gen Ryzen Mobile APU is built with industry-leading 12nm technology. The Ryzen 5 3550H chip powering FX505DY and FX705DY boasts four cores and eight threads that deliver capable performance for popular games and everyday work. Multithreaded performance is particularly strong, yet the processor fits into a 35W power envelope that doesn’t compromise battery life.

Vega-based integrated graphics allow the APU to power the laptop all on its own, which helps conserve power and extend battery life to over seven hours of 1080p video playback on FX705DY and nearly six hours on FX505DY. Discrete GPUs are where it’s at for proper gaming so when it’s time to play, AMD Switchable Graphics tech automatically activates the laptop’s discrete Radeon RX 560X. The GPU pumps out smooth frame rates in mainstays like Fortnite and Overwatch, as well as esports classics like League of Legends and Dota 2."

Both models have NanoEdge displays with thin bezels and wide viewing angles and variable refresh rates, and while the larger FX705DY provides a FreeSync range of 40-60Hz, the FX505DY offers 48-120Hz capability.

FX705DY_Red Matter.png

Specifications from ASUS for the TUF Gaming FX505DY and FX705DY include:

  • Processor: AMD Ryzen 5 3550H
  • Display:
    • 15.6" FHD NanoEdge wide-view display up to 120Hz
    • 17.3" FHD NanoEdge wide-view display
  • Graphics: AMD Radeon RX 560X
  • Memory: Up to 32GB DDR4 2400MHz
  • Storage: Up to 512GB PCIe SSD
  • Up to 1TB FireCuda SSHD
  • Wireless: 802.11a/b/g/n/ac WLAN, Bluetooth 4.2
  • Connectivity:
    • 2x USB 3.1 Gen1
    • 1x USB 2.0
    • 1x HDMI 2.0
    • 1x RJ-45 jack
    • 1x 3.5mm headphone and mic combo jack
    • 1x Kensington lock
  • Keyboard and touchpad  : 1.8mm key travel
  • Customizable RGB or red backlighting
  • Audio: DTS Headphone: X
  • Battery: 48Wh Lithium-polymer battery (FX505DY), 64Wh Lithium-polymer battery (FX705DY)
  • OS: Windows 10
  • Weight: 4.85 lbs (FX505DY), 5.73 lbs (FX705DY)

Official pricing was not revealed in the press release, but we should be able to expect some fairly agressive sub-$1000 pricing with these at the base configuration level.

Source: ASUS

CES 2019: New Lenovo "Legion" Displays: Y44w & Y27gq

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | January 7, 2019 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, Lenovo, g-sync, freesync 2, display, ces 2019, CES, amd

Lenovo has added two monitors to their Legion line of gaming devices.

lenovo-2019-ces-legion-bigmonitor.jpg

The Lenovo Legion Y44w is a 43.4” gaming display. Most of that size is horizontal, however, because it has a 32:10 aspect ratio. If you have ever used a 1920x1200 monitor, which was the PC equivalent of 1080p while PC manufacturers believed that 16:9 was too wide so they settled on 16:10 for the Windows Vista era, then you should imagine two of them side-by-side in a single monitor. In fact, the Y44w supports two separate video inputs if you wish to split the monitor down the middle into two side-by-side 1920x1200 displays. It can also operate as a single, 3840x1200 display, of course. This resolution is a little over half of a 4K panel, so it should be easier for second-tier GPUs to feed.

Beyond the resolution, the color gamut is listed as “99% sRGB, BT.709, DCI-P3” and it is certified as VESA HDR400. If the slide deck is correct and it can do 99% DCI-P3 at HDR400, then it should have an amazing picture. It can also do 144 Hz with FreeSync 2, so you do not need to compromise refresh rate to get those beautiful colors. The also have an optional speaker from Harman Kardon that can be attached to the display.

The Lenovo Legion Y44w will be available in April 2019 for $1199.99 USD.

lenovo-2019-ces-legion-littlemonitor.jpg

Lenovo also announced the Legion Y27gq gaming monitor. This one is a standard 16:9, 1440p, TN panel that can be driven up to 240 Hz. It supports G-Sync, but not HDR. Despite not supporting HDR, it still covers 90% of DCI-P3, which is quite wide for a TN panel. Lenovo is listing it as an “eSport gaming monitor”… so you can probably guess that high refresh rate and G-Sync are the focus.

If you gotta go fast, then the Lenovo Legion Y27gq is available in April 2019 for $999.99 USD.

Source: Lenovo

NVIDIA adapts to the market and frees their displays

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2019 - 01:47 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, g-sync, freesync, benq, asus, AOC, amd, adaptive sync, acer

G-SYNC is showing some signs of defeat as today NVIDIA announced that several Adaptive Sync monitors have been tested and rated as G-SYNC compatible.  Adaptive Sync is the official VESA technology which is present in AMD's FreeSync monitors and it offers a definitive financial advantage over NVIDIA's G-SYNC as the module required for G-SYNC can add hundreds of dollars to the price.

So far only a dozen monitors out of around 400 tests have been rated as G-SYNC compatible, so don't expect to be mixing your monitors quite yet but it does imply in some cases the extra controller is not required for variable refresh rates with either NVIDIA's or AMD's GPUs.   The results of this test give AMD bragging rights for implementing adaptive sync in the most attractive way but this change could hurt GPU sales as users can now opt for an GeForce card paired with a FreeSync display.

Even if your display is not listed in those models, you can try enabling adaptive sync over DisplayPort and see if it works, though your results may vary. Ars Technica lists the models here.

gsync-overview-nobg.png

"Besides being unexpected good news for gamers who already own one of these FreeSync monitors, this is also great news for gamers that want to add VRR to their Nvidia graphics card setup without breaking the bank."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

AMD Launches 2nd Gen 15W and 35W Ryzen 3000 Mobile Processors with Vega Graphics

Subject: Processors | January 6, 2019 - 03:07 PM |
Tagged: Zen+, vega APU, ryzen mobile, ces2019, athlon, amd

AMD today officially announced its lineup of 2nd generation Ryzen mobile processors, designated Ryzen 3000 Series Mobile Processors. Unlike AMD’s expected 3000-series desktop launch, which will be based on Zen 2, these new mobile variants stick with AMD’s 12nm Zen+ architecture.

Each 15- or 35-watt model features Vega graphics and core/thread counts ranging from 2 cores/4 threads to 4 cores/8 threads. AMD is touting improvements in battery life and overall performance, claiming that the top-end 15-watt part can best the Intel i7-8550U by up to 29 percent in media editing, while the mid-tier 15-watt Ryzen 5 3500U beats its Intel counterpart, the i5-8250U, by up to 14 percent in website loading speed.

Model Cores/Threads TDP Boost/Base Freq. Graphics GPU Cores Max GPU Freq.
AMD Ryzen 7 3750H 4/8 35W 4.0/2.3GHz Vega 10 1400MHz
AMD Ryzen 7 3700U 4/8 15W 4.0/2.3GHz Vega 10 14000MHz
AMD Ryzen 5 3550H 4/8 35W 3.7/2.1GHz Vega 8 1200MHz
AMD Ryzen 5 3500U 4/8 15W 3.7/2.1GHz Vega 8 1200MHz
AMD Ryzen 3 3300U 4/4 15W 3.5/2.1GHz Vega 5 1200MHz
AMD Ryzen 3 3200U 2/4 15W 3.5/2.6GHz Vega 3 1200MHz
AMD Athlon 300U 2/4 15W 3.3/2.4GHz Vega 3 1000MHz
AMD A6-9220C 2/2 6W 2.7/1.8GHz R5 3 cores
192 shaders
720MHz
AMD A4-9120C 2/2 6W 2.4/1.6GHz R4 3 cores
192 shaders
600MHz

The initial batch of laptops featuring Ryzen 3000 Series Mobile Processors will be available in the first quarter from partners Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP, Huawei, Lenovo, and Samsung, with additional product launches coming later in the year.

In addition to its flagship Ryzen mobile lineup, AMD is launching a Zen-based Athlon mobile processor, the Athlon 300U, to target entry-level price points. The company has also announced two new 6-watt A-Series chips aimed at the Chromebook market.

Finally, on the software side, AMD announced that starting this quarter, it will provide Radeon Adrenalin driver support to any laptop with a Ryzen processor and integrated Radeon graphics. This will simplify the driver situation for both consumers and manufacturers, as well as give AMD the ability to directly update gamers’ devices for the latest features and game optimizations.

With AMD getting its arguably less-exciting mobile announcements “out of the way” to start CES, this paves the way for the company to make its big desktop-focused announcements during Dr. Lisa Su’s CES keynote on Wednesday.

Source: AMD

MSI's holiday miracle, you can now overclock the Athlon 200GE

Subject: Processors | December 26, 2018 - 11:52 AM |
Tagged: overclock, 200GE, amd, msi, b350, b450, AM4

If you happen to have an MSI B450 or B350 motherboard, get out there and grab the latest UEFI BIOS which updates support for AGESA version 1.0.0.6 as it may be pulled soon.  The reason it may not last is because it will let you overclock your Athlon 200GE processor, something which is generally impossible to pull off.  TechSpot tried it out successfully on a variety of MSI boards, such as the Gaming Pro Carbon AC and managed to bump the $55 processor from 3.2GHz to 3.8GHz.  You won't see a huge increase in performance, though you will see some and it makes for an interesting experiment.

2018-12-02-image-2.jpg

"In an unexpected turn of events, it's now possible to overclock the otherwise-locked $55 Athlon 200GE processor. In what appears to be a slip up by MSI, the component maker has enabled Athlon overclocking with their latest BIOS release across its entire AM4 motherboard lineup."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: TechSpot

AMD Announces Availability of Athlon Processors With Vega Graphics APUs

Subject: Processors | December 22, 2018 - 12:02 AM |
Tagged: Zen, ryzen, rx vega, athlon, APU, amd, 240GE, 220GE

Today AMD announced the availability of its budget Zen-based Athlon Processor with Vega Graphics APUs and released details about the Athlon 220GE and Athlon 240GE APUs that complement the Athlon 200GE it talked about back in September.

AMD Athlon Processor With Radeon Vega Graphics_APU.png

These Athlon 200-series processors are aimed at the budget and mainstream markets to fill the need for a basic processor for everyday tasks such as browsing the internet, checking email, and doing homework. The APUs utilize a 14nm manufacturing process and pair Zen CPU cores with a Vega-based GPU in a 35 watt power envelope, and are aimed at desktops utilizing the AM4 socket.

The Athlon 200GE, 220GE, and 240GE are all dual core, 4-thread processors with 4MB L3 cache and GPUs with 3 compute units (192 cores) clocked at 1 GHz. They all support dual channel DDR4 2667 MHz memory and have 35W TDPs. Where the Athlon APUs differ is in CPU clockspeeds with the higher numbered models having slightly higher base clock speeds.

APU Model Athlon 200GE Athlon 220GE Athlon 240GE
Cores/Threads 2 / 4 2 / 4 2 / 4
Base Freq 3.2 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.5 GHz
Graphics CUs 3 3 3
Graphics Freq 1 GHz 1 GHz 1 GHz
L3 Cache 4MB 4MB 4MB
TDP 35W 35W 35W
Pricing (SEP) $55 $65 $75

The Athlon 200GE starts at 3.2 GHz for $54.98 with an additional $10 buying you the 3.4 GHz 220GE and another $10 premium buying the $74.98 Athlon 240GE's 3.5 GHz CPU clocks. The Athlon 220GE seems to be the best value in that respect, because the extra $10 buys you an extra 200 MHz and the jump to the 240GE only gets an extra 100 MHz for the same extra cost. (Keep in mind that these chips are not unlocked.) Then again, if you are on a tight budget where every dollar counts, the 200GE may be what you end up going with so that you can buy better RAM or more storage.

The new chips are available now but it seems retailers aren't quite ready with their listings as while the 200GE is up for sale at Amazon, the 220GE and 240GE are not yet listed online at the time of writing.

The Athlon 200GE-series APUs introduce a new lower-end option that sits below Ryzen 3 at a lower price point for basic desktops doing typical office or home entertainment duties. With a 35W TDP they might also be useful in fanless home theater PCs and game streaming endpoints for gaming on the big screen.

I am also curious whether these chips will be used for by the DIY and enthusiast community as the base for budget (gaming) builds and if they might see the same popularity as the Athlon X4 860K (note: no built-in graphics). I would be interested in the comparison between the 4c/4t 860K ($57) and the 2c/4t 200GE ($55) to see how they stack up with the newer process node and core design. On the other hand, enthusiasts may well be better served with the overclockable Ryzen 3 2200G ($97) if they want a budget Zen-based part that also has its own GPU.

What are your thoughts on the new Athlon APUs?

Related reading:

Source: AMD

AMD Ryzen Mobile Picasso APUs Spotted in Benchmark Results

Subject: Processors | December 19, 2018 - 08:47 PM |
Tagged: Zen+, ryzen mobile, ryzen, rumor, picasso, geekbench, amd

Twitter user APISAK is at it again with more hardware leaks, and this time the rumors surround AMD's next generation mobile 3000U-series "Picasso" APUs which will replace Raven Ridge in 2019. The new APUs were reportedly spotted by APISAK (@TUM_APISAK on Twitter) as reported by Hexus in two HP laptops in 14" and 17" form factors and offer power efficiency and performance improvements over Raven Ridge's CPU cores along with Vega-based graphics. Searching around online and parsing the various conflicting rumors and speculation on Picasso, I think it is most likely that Picasso is 12nm and utilizes Zen+ CPU cores though it remains to be seen how true that is.

Ryzen Mobile AMD APUs.jpg

Based on previous roadmaps, AMD's APUs have trailed the desktop CPUs in process technology and architecture instead opting to refine the previous generation for mobile rather than operating at its bleeding edge so while 2019 will see Zen 2 architecture-based CPUs and GPUs built on 7nm, APUs in 2019 are likely to stick with 12nm and Zen+ tuned for a mobile power envelope with tweaks to SenseMI and technology like mobile XFR and dynamic power delivery.

In any event, Picasso APUs are rumored to include the Ryzen 3 3200U, Ryzen 3 3300U, and Ryzen 5 3500U based on Geekbench results pages as well as the low-end [Athlon?] 3000U and the high-end Ryzen 5 3700U - according to the source. The 3000U and 3700U are known in name only, but the middle-tier APUs have a bit more information available thanks to Geekbench. The Ryzen 3 3200U is a dual core (four thread) part while the Ryzen 3 3300U and Ryzen 5 3500U are quad core (eight thread) CPUs. All Picasso APUs are rumored to use Vega-based graphics. The dual core APU has the highest base clock at 2.6 Ghz while the 3300U and 3500U start at 2.1 GHz. The Ryzen 5 3700U allegedly clocks from 2.2 GHz to 3.8 GHz and likely has the highest boost clock of the bunch. The parts use the FP5 mobile socket.

Picasso APU Geekbench scores based on HP Laptop 17-ca1xxx except 3200U Compute which is from HP Laptop 14-cm1xxx. Carrizo APU scores based on HP Pavilion. The i5-8359U CPU scores are from. HP Elitebook X360 and Compute score from Dell Latitude 7490.
  Athlon(?) 3000U Ryzen 3 3200U Ryzen 3 3300U Ryzen 5 3500U Ryzen 5 3700U A10-8700P (Carrizo) Intel Core i5-8359U
Cores / Threads ? 2 / 4 4 / 4 4 / 8 4 / 8 2 / 4 4 / 8
Base / Boost Clocks ? 2.6 / ? GHz 2.1 / ? GHz 2.1 / ? GHz 2.2 / 3.8 GHz 1.8 / 3.19 GHz 1.9 / 3.59 GHz
Cache ? 4 MB 4 MB 4 MB 4 MB 2 MB 6 MB
Graphics Vega Vega 3 6 CU (920 MHz) Vega 6 6 CU (1.2 GHz) Vega 8 8 CU (1.2 GHz) Vega R6 6 CUs (GCN 1.2) UHD 620 24 CUs (1.1 GHz)
Socket FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP5/AM4 FP4 1356 FCBGA
Geekbench Single Core ? 3467 3654 3870 ? 2113 4215
Geekbench Multi Core ? 6735 9686 11284 ? 4328 12768
Geekbench Graphics ? 23698 26540 31947 ? 20009 16279

Looking at the Geekbench results (which you should take with a grain of salt and as just an approximation because final scores would depend on the platform, cooling, and how it ends up clocking within its power envelope) it seems that AMD may have a decent chip on its hands that improves the performance over Raven Ridge a bit and significantly over its older Excavator-based pre-Zen designs. A cursory comparison with Kaby Lake shows that AMD is not quite to par in CPU performance (particularly per core but it comes close in multi-core) but offers notably better compute / GPU performance thanks to the Vega graphics. It seems that AMD is closing the gap at least with Zen+.

I am remaining skeptical but optimistic about AMD's Picasso APUs. I am looking forward to more information on the new chips and the devices that will use them. I am hoping that my educated guess is correct with regard to Picasso being 12nm Zen+ or better as rumor is mainly that Picasso is a Raven Ridge successor that offers power and performance tweaks without going into further detail. I expect more information on Picasso (APU) and Matisse (CPU) to come out as soon as next month at CES 2019.

What are your thoughts on Picasso?

Source: Hexus

JEDEC Updates HBM Standard with 24GB Capacity and Faster Speed

Subject: Graphics Cards, Memory | December 17, 2018 - 04:33 PM |
Tagged: Vega, radeon, JESD235, jedec, high bandwidth memory, hbm, DRAM, amd

In a press release today JEDEC has announced an update to the HBM standard, with potential implications for graphics cards utilizing the technology (such as an AMD Radeon Vega 64 successor, perhaps?).

"This update extends the per pin bandwidth to 2.4 Gbps, adds a new footprint option to accommodate the 16 Gb-layer and 12-high configurations for higher density components, and updates the MISR polynomial options for these new configurations."

HBM_Original.PNG

Original HBM graphic via AMD

The revised spec brings the JEDEC standard up to the level we saw with Samsung's "Aquabolt" HBM2 and its 307.2 GB/s per-stack bandwidth, but with 12-high TSV stacks (up from 8) which raises memory capacity from 8GB to a whopping 24GB per stack.

The full press release from JEDEC follows:

ARLINGTON, Va., USA – DECEMBER 17, 2018 – JEDEC Solid State Technology Association, the global leader in the development of standards for the microelectronics industry, today announced the publication of an update to JESD235 High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) DRAM standard.  HBM DRAM is used in Graphics, High Performance Computing, Server, Networking and Client applications where peak bandwidth, bandwidth per watt, and capacity per area are valued metrics to a solution’s success in the market.   The standard was developed and updated with support from leading GPU and CPU developers to extend the system bandwidth growth curve beyond levels supported by traditional discrete packaged memory.  JESD235B is available for download from the JEDEC website.

JEDEC standard JESD235B for HBM leverages Wide I/O and TSV technologies to support densities up to 24 GB per device at speeds up to 307 GB/s. This bandwidth is delivered across a 1024-bit wide device interface that is divided into 8 independent channels on each DRAM stack.  The standard can support 2-high, 4-high, 8-high, and 12-high TSV stacks of DRAM at full bandwidth to allow systems flexibility on capacity requirements from 1 GB – 24 GB per stack.

This update extends the per pin bandwidth to 2.4 Gbps, adds a new footprint option to accommodate the 16 Gb-layer and 12-high configurations for higher density components, and updates the MISR polynomial options for these new configurations.  Additional clarifications are provided throughout the document to address test features and compatibility across generations of HBM components.

Source: JEDEC

AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition Adds Mobile & VR Game Streaming, Performance Tuning

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 13, 2018 - 09:01 AM |
Tagged: Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition, radeon software, radeon, gpu, drivers, amd, Adrenalin Edition

AMD today released the latest major update to its Radeon software and driver suite. Building on the groundwork laid last year, AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition brings a number of new features and performance improvements.

amd-radeon-adrenalin-2019-edition.jpg

With this year’s software update, AMD continues to make significant gains in game performance compared to last year’s driver release, with an average gain of up to 15 percent in across a range of popular titles. Examples include Assassin’s Creed Odyssey (11%), Battlefield V (39%), and Shadow of the Tomb Raider (15%).

amd-adrenalin-2019-games.jpg

New Features

Beyond performance, Adrenalin 2019 Edition introduces a number of new and improved features. Highlights include:

Game Streaming: Radeon gamers can now stream any game or application from their PCs to their mobile devices via the AMD Link app at up to 4K 60fps. The feature supports both on-screen controls as well as Bluetooth controllers. ReLive streaming is also expanding to VR, with users able to stream games and videos from their PCs to standalone VR headsets via new AMD VR store apps. This includes Steam VR titles, allowing users to play high-quality PC-based VR games on select standalone headsets. AMD claims that its streaming technology offers “up to 44% faster responsiveness” than other game streaming solutions.

amd-adrenalin-2019-game-streaming.jpg

ReLive Streaming and Sharing: Gamers more interested in streaming their games to other people will find several new features in AMD’s ReLive feature, including adjustable picture-in-picture instant replays from 5 to 30 seconds, automatic GIF creation, and a new scene editor with more stream overlay options and hotkey-based scene transition control.

Radeon Game Advisor: A new overlay available in-game that helps users designate their target experience (performance vs. quality) and then recommends game-specific settings to achieve that target. Since the tool is running live alongside the game, it can respond to changes as they occur and dynamically recommend updated settings and options.

amd-adrenalin-2019-game-advisor.jpg

Radeon Settings Advisor: A new tool in the Radeon Software interface that scans system configuration and settings and recommends changes (e.g., enabling or disabling Radeon Chill, changing the display refresh rate, enabling HDR) to achieve an optimal gaming experience.

WattMan One-Click Tuning Improvements: Radeon WattMan now supports automatic tuning of memory overclocking, GPU undervolting, expanded fan control options, and unlocked DPM states for RX Vega series cards.

Display Improvements: FreeSync 2 can now tone-map HDR content to look better on displays that don’t support the full color and contrast of the HDR spec, and AMD’s Virtual Super Resolution feature is now supported on ultra-wide displays.

amd-adrenalin-2019-freesync2-hdr.jpg

Radeon Overlay: AMD’s Overlay feature which allows gamers to access certain Radeon features without leaving their game has been updated to display system performance metrics, WattMan configuration options, Radeon Enhanced Sync controls, and the aforementioned Game Advisor.

amd-adrenalin-2019-amd-link-voice-control.jpg

AMD Link: AMD’s mobile companion app now offers easier setup via QR code scanning, voice control of various Radeon and ReLive settings (e.g., start/stop streaming, save replay, take screenshot), WattMan controls, enhanced performance metrics, and the ability to initiate a Radeon Software update.

Availability

Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition is available now from AMD’s support website for all supported AMD GPUs.

Source: AMD