Lucky winners choice; an i7-8086k or a Threadripper 1950X

Subject: General Tech | June 19, 2018 - 02:37 PM |
Tagged: Intel, amd, i7-8086k, 1950x, funny

If you are so lucky as to be one of the 8086 people who won an Intel i7-8086K, live in the US and can be one of the first 40 to respond to AMD you can trade in your Anniversary Edition for a Threadripper 1950X.  AMD have offered this limited, tongue in cheek deal for those who prefer a higher PCIe lane count to a higher frequency, at least as long as you are a US resident.   The i7-8086K does offer better overall performance, though it can be finicky as Ken and others have discovered.  The Intel contest is closed, but they do state it may take up to two weeks for the winners to receive a confirmation email, hopefully they arrive in time for those who would like to swap.  The Inquirer has a link to Intel's Twitter response to this move, if you are interested.

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"AMD HAS PICKED UP A STICK and decided to give Intel a damn-good prod, as it's offering people who've won the Core i7-8086K the option to trade it in for its own Threadripper 1950X."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #503 - Intel i7-8086K, Corsair Void Pro headset, and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 14, 2018 - 03:24 PM |
Tagged: video, zotac, VOID PRO, toshiba, Optane, noctua, logitech, Intel, i7-8086k, G512, corsair, coolermaster, amd, podcast

PC Perspective Podcast #503 - 06/14/18

Join us this week for discussion on Intel i7-8086K, Corsair Void Pro headset, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:18:14

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:10:55 Ryan: Transcend USB 3.0 Card Reader for $8!
      1. Can get it in pink for $.01 less!
    2. 1:12:10 Jeremy: Go for the Gold with Corsair’s Crystal Series 460X
    3. 1:13:15 Josh: Whoa...
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

T'was a dark and StorMI knight

Subject: Storage | June 11, 2018 - 06:10 PM |
Tagged: amd, StorMI, tiered storage

AMD's Store Machine Intelligence Technology seeks to create a hybrid better than the sum of its parts, combining the low cost of cold spinning rust with the speed of hot flash based drives.  The implementation is not the same as Intel's SRT which treats your SSD as a cache to move frequently used files to the SSD but instead works like a tiered storage system.  That indicates entire files are moving from hot storage to cold storage as their usage patterns change and are not constantly being rebuilt. 

From the testing which [H]ard|OCP did, the machine intelligence part of StorMI lives up to its name, and the installation and configuration are very well done, to the point where they declare Intel's Rapid Storage Technology to be outclassed and should not even be considered as competition to AMD's storage stacking skills.

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"AMD’s StoreMI or (Store Machine Intelligence Technology) is storage performance enhancement technology, which can accelerate the responsiveness and the perceived speed of mechanical storage devices to SSD levels. This isn’t exactly a new concept, but AMD’s approach to this implementation is different than what we’ve seen in the past."

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Storage

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel

A little Optane for your HDD

Intel's Optane Memory caching solution, launched in April of 2017, was a straightforward feature. On supported hardware platforms, consisting of 7th and 8th generation Core processor-based computers, users could add a 16 or 32gb Optane M.2 module to their PC and enable acceleration for their slower boot device (generally a hard drive). Beyond that, there weren't any additional options; you could only enable and disable the caching solution. 

However, users who were looking for more flexibility were out of luck. If you already had a fast boot device, such as an NVMe SSD, you had no use for these Optane Memory modules, even if you a slow hard drive in their system for mass storage uses that you wanted to speed up.

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At GDC this year, Intel alongside the announcement of 64GB Optane Memory modules, announced that they are bringing support for secondary drive acceleration to the Optane Memory application.

Now that we've gotten our hands on this new 64GB module and the appropriate software, it's time to put it through its paces and see if it was worth the wait.

Performance

The full test setup is as follows:

Test System Setup
CPU

Intel Core i7-8700K

Motherboard Gigabyte H370 Aorus Gaming 3 
Memory

16GB Crucial DDR4-2666 (running at DDR4-2666)

Storage

Intel SSD Optane 800P 

Intel Optane Memory 64GB and 1TB Western Digital Black

Sound Card On-board
Graphics Card NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB
Graphics Drivers NVIDIA 397.93
Power Supply Corsair RM1000x
Operating System Windows 10 Pro x64 RS4

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In coming up with test scenarios to properly evaluate drive caching on a secondary, mass storage device, we had a few criteria. First, we were looking for scenarios that require lots of storage, meaning that they wouldn't fit on a smaller SSD. In addition to requiring a lot of storage, the applications must also rely on fast storage. 

Click here to continue reading our look at accelerating secondary drives with Optane

He's a VII time Crosshair Hero!

Subject: Motherboards | June 8, 2018 - 04:36 PM |
Tagged: asus, x470, amd, ryzen, crosshair vii hero, AM4

Even after years of suggestions and beratement, CMOS battery placement remains a sore spot for a variety of reveiwers.  The Crosshair VII Hero is no exception, where the battery will be buried under you GPU; what is exceptional is that this is the sole shortcoming to this AM4 board.  [H]ard|OCP were duly impressed by the features and performance of this board, as well as the price tag, which is nicely under $300.   Whether you plan on taking advantage of Precision Boost 2 or manually overclocking, this is a board worth checking out.

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"Along with the second generation AMD Ryzen CPUs, we are getting the new and somewhat improved X470 chipset motherboards. We have been beating on the Crosshair VII Hero for about a month now and have figured out what we like about, outside of it being an excellent overclocker for the Ryzen 7 CPUs."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Computex 2018: AMD and Cooler Master Unveil Wraith Ripper Air Cooler For Threadripper Processors

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 8, 2018 - 11:39 AM |
Tagged: cooler master, amd, Threadripper, threadripper 2, Zen+, computex, computex 2018, tr4

In an interview with AMD Senior Vice President Jim Anderson, PC World's Gordon Mah Ung got the chance to discuss and get hands on with second generation Threadripper as well as AMD's new Wraith Ripper air cooler. Developed in partnership with Cooler Master, the Wraith Ripper is a massive air cooler capable of keeping even the upcoming 32 core Threadripper processor cool (allegedly a 250W TDP part!) which, as Jim Anderson notes, has all four dies on the package being used (first generation Threadripper used two hot dies and two spacers).

Cooler Master Wraithripper Threadripper Cooler.png

The behemoth features a full cover block for Threadripper that connects to a very dense aluminum fin stack using 14 nickel plated copper heatpipes. There is a single fan in the center of the fin stack hiding under a black fan shroud that covers the top and left and right sides. The black shroud also holds the customizable RGB lighting which lights up the logo and outline around the edges of the shroud. The fan is allegedly rated at 39 dBa which is pretty good considering the amount of heat it needs to dissipate from Threadripper CPUs. Likely due to the HSF's sheer size Cooler Master was able to go with a larger and slower spinning fan.

Other details like weight, cost, and release date are still unknown though it does appear to have some heft to it! It should be available later this year following the Q3 launch of second generation Threadripper though it will work fine with first generation Threadripper processors as well as they use the same TR4 socket.

Also read:

Computex 2018: MSI Unleashes X399 MEG Creation Motherboard for Threadripper 2

Subject: Motherboards | June 8, 2018 - 10:54 AM |
Tagged: X399, tr4, threadripper 2, Threadripper, msi, computex 2018, computex, amd

Following AMD’s reveal of a 32 core Threadripper 2 (12nm Zen+ not Zen 2) processor using all four dies coming in Q3, it is only natural that new TR4 socket motherboards would emerge. MSI was well prepared for the reveal with its upcoming X399 MEG Creation motherboard on display at Computex. The massive E-ATX motherboard features a black PCB with silver accents and two huge heatsinks covering the VRMs in the top left and the chipset and three M.2 slots in the bottom right. The TR4 socket sits between eight DDR4 DIMM slots and is topped by a ludicrous 16+3 power phase (doubled eight for vCore, the remaining phases for vSoC) cooled by a large heatsink. The board takes power from two 8-pin and one 24-pin power connector.

MSI X399 MEG Creation EATX Threadripper 2 Motherboard.jpg

TechPowerUp got hands on with the new board at Computex.

Below the processor sits four PCI-E x16 slots (wired x16/x8/x16/x8) and a single PCI-E x1 slot. There are eight SATA 6 Gbps ports along the right edge of the board and below the L shaped heatsink users can install three M.2 solid state drives. MSI claims that enthusiasts can install up to seven M.2 drives using the 3 M.2 slots on the motherboard as well as four slots provided by a PCI-E add-on card (e.g. MSI Xpander AERO PCIe).

Around back the X399 MEG Creation offers up 10 USB 3.1 ports (one Type-C), two Gigabit Ethernet ports, two Wi-Fi antenna connectors for the 2x2 802.11ac Wi-Fi and BT 5.0 radios, and six audio outputs (5 analog, one optical).

The massive Threadripper motherboard reportedly has 10 PWM fan connectors and three temperature sensors to aid in cooling and overclocking. The board also has handy BIOS flashing and overclocking features galore.

The X399 MEG Creation supports Threadripper as well as the upcoming Threadripper 2000 series processors and should make for an interesting setup for enthusiasts! The lack of 10 Gigabit Ethernet is dissapointing, but at least the two gigabit NICs are Intel based (MSI is using Intel for the Wi-Fi as well). If you are curious about the new X399 board, Tom's Hardware and TechPowerUp managed to snap several photos of the high-end motherboard at the MSI booth. If you prefer video, Gamer's Nexus has a short clip of it here.

KitGuru is reporting that the massive motherboard will cost upwards of $500. MSI has not yet revealed a launch date. Presumably we can expect the X399 MEG Creation to be available sometime in Q3 just in time for the Threadripper 2000 series availability.

Also read:

Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: ASUS

Is it a usable feature?

EDIT: We've received some clarification from Intel on this feature:

"The feature is actually apart of RST. While this is a CPU-attached storage feature, it is not VROC. VROC is a CPU-attached PCIe Storage component of the enterprise version of the product, Intel RSTe. VROC requires the new HW feature Intel Volume Management Device (Intel VMD) which is not available on the Z370 Chipset.

The Intel Rapid Storage Technology for CPU-attached Intel PCIe Storage feature is supported with select Intel chipsets and requires system manufacturer integration. Please contact the system manufacturer for a list of their supported platforms."

While this doesn't change how the feature works, or our testing, we wanted to clarify this point and have removed all references to VROC on Z370 in this review.

While updating our CPU testbeds for some upcoming testing, we came across an odd listing on the UEFI updates page for our ASUS ROG STRIX Z370-E motherboard.

asus-uefi.png

From the notes, it appeared that the release from late April of this year enables VROC for the Z370 platform. Taking a look at the rest of ASUS' Z370 lineup, it appears that all of its models received a similar UEFI update mentioning VROC. EDIT: As it turns out, while these patch notes call this feature "VROC", it is officially known as "Intel Rapid Storage Technology for CPU-attached Intel PCIe Storage " and slightly different than VROC on other Intel platforms.

While we are familiar with VROC as a CPU-attached RAID technology for NVMe devices on the Intel X299 and Xeon Scalable platforms, it has never been mentioned as an available option for the enthusiast grade Z-series chipsets. Could this be a preview of a feature that Intel has planned to come for the upcoming Z390 chipset?

Potential advantages of a CPU-attached RAID mode on the Z370 platform mostly revolve around throughput. While the chipset raid mode on the Z370 chipset will support three drives, the total throughput is limited to just under 4GB/s by the DMI 3.0 link between the processor and chipset.

Like we've seen AMD do on their X470 platform, CPU-attached RAID should scale as long as you have CPU-connected PCI-Express lanes available, and not being used by another device like a GPU or network card.

First, some limitations.

Primarily, it's difficult to connect multiple NVMe devices to the CPU rather than the chipset on most Z370 motherboards. Since the platform natively supports NVMe RAID through the Z370 chipset, all of the M.2 slots on our Strix Z370-E are wired to go through the chipset connection rather than directly to the CPU's PCIe lanes.

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To combat this, we turned to the ASUS Hyper M.2 X16 card, which utilizes PCIe bifurcation to enable usage of 4 M.2 devices via one PCI-E X16 slot. Luckily, ASUS has built support for bifurcation, and this Hyper M.2 card into the UEFI for the Strix Z370-E.

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Aiming to simplify the setup, we are using the integrated UHD 620 graphics of the i7-8700K, and running the Hyper M.2 card in the primary PCIe slot, usually occupied by a discrete GPU.

Continue reading our look at CPU-attached NVMe RAID on Z370 motherboards from ASUS!

Computex 2018: MSI Launches B450 Tomahawk Motherboard

Subject: Motherboards | June 8, 2018 - 09:14 AM |
Tagged: ryzen 2000, ryzen, msi, computex 2018, computex, b450, APU, amd, AM4

One of the motherboards on display at the MSI booth was an updated AM4 socket Tomahawk series board that uses the new AMD B450 chipset. The MSI B450 Tomahawk is a refreshed motherboard for AMD Ryzen processors. The motherboard pairs the AM4 socket with four DDR4 DIMM slots, six SATA 6 Gbps ports, two PCI-E x16 slots, three PCI-E x1 slots, and a single M.2 slot.

MSI B450 Tomahawk.png

The B450 Tomahawk is powered by an 8-pin and 24-pin power connector and appears to have a 4+2 power phase design which matches that of the current B350 Tomahawk. One thing that MSI has changed in that department is the heatsink over the VRMs which has been beefed with an "extended heatsink design" that up an extends to partially cover the rear I/O ports now. Other updates versus the B350 Tomahawk include the removal of two legacy PCI slots in favor of adding a third PCI-E x1 slot and the addition of two additional SATA ports in the lower left corner.

It is not clear what the board specifically has as far as rear I/O, but from the photos and press release it appears as though the VGA port may have been removed versus the previous generation board and it does have USB 3.1 Gen 2 along with Gigabit Ethernet and analog audio outputs (looking at the photos the audio hardware has slightly changed as well though it's hard to say to what extent).

MSI is not yet talking pricing or availability, but more information should be available soon. TechPowerUp has a hands on photo of the board here as well as a cheaper and cut down B450-A Pro motherboard.

Source: MSI

Computex 2018: PowerColor Makes the RX Vega 56 Nano Edition Official

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 8, 2018 - 08:22 AM |
Tagged: Vega Nano, SFF, RX Vega 56, powercolor, mini ITX, computex 2018, computex, amd

PowerColor’s new small form factor RX Vega 56 based graphics card was shown off at Computex 2018 and finally made the card official with more information provided on it following the rumors and official teaser last month. The PowerColor RX Vega 56 Nano Edition is the spiritual successor to AMD’s Fiji XT-based R9 Nano from 2015 and features an AMD RX Vega 56 GPU with 8GB HBM2 memory in a short dual slot graphics card measuring 170mm x 95mm x 38mm. In fact, PowerColor’s RX Vega 56 Nano Edition has a PCB that is only 5mm longer (according to TechPowerUp) than AMD’s previous Nano card and including the cooler is less than 2 cm longer.

PowerColor RX Vega 56 Nano Edition Mini ITX.png

PowerColor’s new SFF graphics card is a dual slot design with a single 80mm fan and dense aluminum heatsink covered by a black plastic shroud providing cooling. The card is powered by  8-pin and 6-pin power connectors and the card offers three DisplayPort 1.4 and one HDMI 2.0b display outputs.

The RX Vega 56 GPU features 56 CUs (compute units) with 3,584 shader processors and 224 texture units. PowerColor has kept the GPU at reference clockspeeds of 1,156 MHz base and up to 1,471 MHz boost. The 8GB of HBM2 memory is stock clocked at 800 MHz and connects to the GPU via a 2048-bit bus.

The PowerColor RX Vega 56 Nano Edition will reportedly be available shortly with a $449 MSRP. The new small form factor Nano Edition card offers an interesting proposition for gamers wanting to build in Mini ITX systems. So long as PowerColor can get the card out at close to MSRP and performance is still there without too much thermal limitations I think there is a definite niche market for it. (Note that the R9 Nano debuted at $650 MSRP!)

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Source: PowerColor