Cooler Master Announces Hyper 212 Black Edition CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 29, 2018 - 10:27 AM |
Tagged: tower cooler, RGB, Hyper 212, heatsink, cpu cooler, cooling, cooler master, black edition, air cooler

The legendary Hyper 212 series from Cooler Master has a stealthy new look, with the upcoming Hyper 212 Black Edition coolers. Not just a cosmetic change, these new Black Edition coolers (available with or without RGB lighting) offer what Cooler Master is calling an "improved installation process from previous models with the same best-in-class performance for an affordable price".

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The Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition cooler (via Cooler Master)

"Designed with PC enthusiasts in mind, the new Hyper 212 Black Edition coolers keep with the familiar four heat pipe design of the original Hyper 212 and continues to offer direct contact technology for more thorough heat dissipation.
 
The updated brushed aluminum top cover, nickel plated anodized fins and heat pipes, and metallic heat pipe caps give the Hyper 212 Black Edition models a premium, aesthetic appeal. The Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition comes equipped with the new SF120R RGB fan and RGB LED controller for lighting customization, while the Hyper 212 Black Edition offers users a more simplified look via the all-black Silencio fan with exclusive Silent Drive IC technology."

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A look at the hardware kit with revised mounting system (via Cooler Master)

The Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition will carry an MSRP of $39.99, with the non-RGB Hyper 212 Black Edition at $34.99. Both coolers go on sale November 5.

Cryorig Shows Off Frostbit M.2 Cooler Ahead of Computex

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 23, 2018 - 09:10 PM |
Tagged: M.2, heatpipes, CRYORIG, air cooler

Cryorig teased a new M.2 cooler ahead of its Computex debut this week. The Cryorig Frostbit M.2 Cooler is the first dual heat pipe cooler that uses a thin 1mm heat pipe that spreads heat across a small heat spreader and a thicker heat pipe that draws heat away to a larger external heatsink.

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The Frostbit cooler measures 72mm x 26.3mm x 57mm (LxWxH) and weighs just over 0.12 pounds (56 grams). The angle of the external circular heatsink and heatpipe can be manually adjusted so that it can fit in systems with a large CPU or GPU cooler. Cryorig’s website notes that the Frostbit features 38 fins (19x2) and is rated at 12W cooling capability.

Cryorig Frostbit M.2 Dual Heatpipe Cooler.jpg

Cryorig's Frostbit certainly looks stylish and capable, but at the same time is definite cooling overkill. Allyn has noted in the past (mostly on podcasts) that while cooling or spreading the heat from the controller and cache can be beneficial, the flash dies themselves on the M.2 drives do not really need to be cooled and in fact a bit of heat can be good for them.

I can see this cooler being used for aesthetics especially in a hard-line water cooling build, but it is likely to come at a premium price. More information should be available on pricing and availability after Computex.

What do you think about this beast? Am I the only one thinking "Maximum Cooling" in a Crysis voiceover style when looking at this thing?

Source: CRYORIG

The one, the only, Cooler Master's MASTERAIR MA621P air cooler for Threadripper

Subject: Networking | April 26, 2018 - 03:52 PM |
Tagged: tr4, Threadripper, MASTERAIR MA621P, cooler master, amd, air cooler

So far we have mostly seen reviews of watercoolers for Threadripper but there is an air cooler designed to tame this multi-threaded beast.  The Cooler Master  MASTERAIR MA621P is one such heatsink, a 1.2kg beast with two fans.  [H]ard|OCP's testing shows this cooler to be capable of cooling your 1950X at stock speeds, but do not expect the overclocks an AiO watercooler allows.  The installation is a bit of a challenge but this is the least expensive cooler for Threadripper, as well as being the only air cooler for it from CM.  Check the full review to get a closer look at this large chunk of metal.

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"The AMD Ryzen Threadripper is a beast when it comes to overclocking and cooling. Cooler Master steps into the ring with the first Threadripper-specific air cooler that we have come across. We have put it through the paces here on our highly overclocked and overvolted 1950X. Does the MasterAir MA621P have what it takes?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

be quiet looks to knock out Noctua

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 12, 2018 - 05:12 PM |
Tagged: be quiet!, dark rock pro 4, air cooler

The new Dark Rock Pro 4 is not messing around, 1.13kg of blackened aluminium standing 162.8x136x145.7 which makes it slightly smaller than Morry's mighty Noctua NH-D15 which helps when installing it in tight places.  The performance does not seem to have suffered at all however, TechPowerUp's review shows it a match to the mighty cooler and it produces less noise as well.  For just about $90 this is well worth looking into, as the mounting hardware has improved as much as the ability to move heat away from your CPU.

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"be quiet! looks to recapture the high-end air-cooling crown with the new and improved Dark Rock Pro 4. It is a dual-fan, dual-tower design that will certainly turn a few heads. However, it won't be due to noise. Silent and powerful, this new challenger looks to dethrone Noctua's NH-D15."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: TechPowerUp
Manufacturer: Scythe

A Trio of Air Coolers

Scythe is a major player in the air cooling space with a dizzying array of coolers for virtually any application from the Japanese company. In addition to some of the most compact coolers in the business Scythe also offers some of the highest performing - and most quiet - tower coolers available. Two of the largest coolers in the lineup are the new Mugen 5 Rev. B, and the Grand Kama Cross 3 - the latter of which is one of their most outlandish designs.

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Rounding out this review we also have a compact tower option from Scythe in the Byakko, which is a 130 mm tall cooler that can fit in a greater variety of enclosures than the Mugen 5 or Grand Kama Cross due to its lower profile. So how did each perform on the cooler test bench? We put these Scythe coolers against the Intel Core i7-7700K to see how potent their cooling abilities are when facing a CPU that gets quite toasty under load. Read on to see how this trio responded to the challenge!

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Continue reading our roundup of three Scythe CPU air coolers!

Just Delivered: Cryorig H5 Ultimate CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 30, 2017 - 02:26 AM |
Tagged: tower cooler, just delivered, FM2+, cryorig h5 ultimate, CRYORIG, air cooling, air cooler

Just Delivered is a section of PC Perspective where we share some of the goodies that pass through our labs that may or may not see a review, but are pretty cool none the less.

Find the Cryorig H5 Ultimate on Amazon!

I have been slowly rebuilding my wife's desktop PC following a failure of the all-in-one liquid CPU cooler that saw leaking coolant kill the motherboard and power supply (surprisingly the GTX 750 Ti survived despite getting a bunch of coolant on it). I recently replaced the motherboard and PSU (while discovering FM2+ boards are still pretty expensive on eBay) and today got in the last component: a Cryorig H5 Ultimate air cooler. I wouldn't mind replacing the TD03 with another water cooler (it was nice and quiet when it worked), but got a good deal on the air cooler. Anyway, the Cryorig H5 Ultimate is a monster tower style air cooler measuring 168.3 x 143 x 110.9 (HxWxL) with the included fan and weighing 920 grams (2.03 pounds).

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I forgot to take an unboxing picture, here is what it comes with though (from Cryorig's website).

The Cryorig H5 Ultimate is rated at 180W TDP and features 38 aluminum fins in an interesting hive / honey comb design that allegedly reduces noise, improves air flow, and strengthens the fin stack. The fins are connected with four 6mm copper heat pipes to the nickel plated C1100 copper baseplate. A 140mm XF140 fan (76 CFM) pushes air through the fin stack spinning anywhere between 700 and 1300 RPM with rated noise levels of 19 to 23 dBA respectively.

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There are no LEDs on this monster, but it doesn't need them to look good in my opinion. Fortunately, the fan height is adjustable and you are able to mount the fan on either side of the heatsink which will be important because it can and will interfere with your RAM modules depending on your motherboard and height of RAM heat spreaders! As you will see, I ran into this, but my PC chassis gave just enough clearance that I was able to move the fan up enough to clear the G.Skill RAM (which is on the shorter side). The fan is mounted using two wires and is fairly easy to take off and install.

Cryorig supports both AMD and Intel motherboards (including AM4 with a separate mounting upgrade kit) including FM1, FM2, AM2, and AM3 on the AMD side and LGA 775, 1156, 1150, 1151, and 2011 on the Intel side. The cooler has two mounting kits for AMD and Intel with both requiring you install a backplate.

Cryorig H5 Ultimate AMD Mounting Kit.jpg

In my case, I am installing the Cryorig H5 Ultimate on a FM2+ socket motherboard. I had to unscrew the default AMD mounting system and install Cryorig's backplate. There are four screws that screw onto the backplate posts with a slight bit of give which is normal (the backplate will not be tightly screwed to the board, it should be able to move a bit). Then another bracket is screwed onto the backplate screws until hand tight (tighten them using the X method going corner to diagonal corner).

Easy enough so far! However, now here is where I ran into some trouble with the installation. Much like the experience of installing RAM for the first time where you can sometimes feel like you need to use a lot more force than you think you should need to install them, the Cryorig cooler takes quite a bit of force to properly install. Learn from my frustration:

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After applying your thermal paste, it's time to install the cooler. You will notice that there are two holes in the top of the cooler and two screw holes in the bracket you installed over the CPU socket. You will line the cooler up so that the spring mounted screws on the cooler are over the holes in the bracket. I found it easiest to put my finger by one of the screws and make sure that screw was lined up, then let down the other side of the cooler so that both screws are lined up. Now, you will need the special screwdriver Cryorig provides in the box. Using one hand push down on the cooler and use the other hand to stick the screwdriver in one of the holes. You will need to keep pressure on the cooler while turning the screw so that it can catch onto the threads in the bracket and start, well, screwing in.  Make a few turns so that it is in, but do not fully tighten the screw down. Now, move your hand to the opposite side of the cooler where the other screw hole is and press down. You will need to push this side of the cooler down with quite a bit of force (again, thinking back to the RAM example, don't hulk smash anything, but don’t' be too gentle either). While keeping pressure on this side to hold it towards the socket, start screwing down this side of the cooler. (If you did it right the other side won't pop out, if you didn't screw the first side down enough it might pop out and you'll have to start over heh) Once both sides are partially in, just alternate screwing the screws down until they are hand tight.

Trust me, you might think you are going to break this thing or bend something, but it's just normal SOP. Finally, plug in the XF140 fan into the CPU_fan header and you're good to go!

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The Cryorig H5 Ultimate dwarfs my GA-F2A78M-HD2 mATX motherboard leaving just enough room for two memory DIMMs and the graphics card! Heck it still looked huge installed in the old A88X ATX board!

Since installing it I have been playing around a bit with the PC trying to get some temperature readings for you, but am discovering that getting accurate temperature readings from AMD processors (especially older APUs) is not that easy. I am still testing things out and looking into overclocking, but best I can tell the Cryorig cooler is keeping the AMD A8 5600K processor somewhere around 55°C under load using AIDA64 stress testing. At idle the cooler is very quiet and while it does ramp up under load it is barely audible compared to the case exhaust fan! This is not a formal review but so far it has been an interesting cooler assuming you can find it at a good price.

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It's alive!!

If you are interested in a monster cooler like this, definitely double check your case and RAM clearances though. The install was not too bad the second time around (I first installed it on her old motherboard not knowing if it was dead yet as I did not have another cooler to test), but it is not as easy on this AMD FM2+ socket as their video (and others I found on YouTube) makes it look for the intel platform! With the knowledge that you can and need to use force to press it down to get the screws in it's a fairly quick install, I just wish that information was better spelled out in the instructions as it would have saved me a ton of time the first go around! I don't have formal noise or temp numbers as I am just starting to test it, but so far, I am happy with it.

Source: Cryorig

Introduction and Specifications

FSP might be familiar as a manufacturer of power supplies, but the company has a growing product offering that now includes cases and CPU coolers, among other things. In this review we will examine the Windale line, which consists of the Windale 4 and Windale 6, a pair of tower-style CPU air coolers.

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"FSP CPU Air Cooler Windale Series come out with two models: Windale 6 and Windale 4. Both of them are featured with CPU direct contact technology which can release CPU heat more efficiently. The 120mm extreme quiet fan enhances better cooling performance. The High-tech 120mm fin design provides optimized cooling effect. They are highly compatible with the latest sockets of Intel and AMD."

FSP has priced their coolers to compete in what is often called a 'crowded market', and the $29.99 Windale 4 in particular seems to directly compete with the ever-popular Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO - on price, if nothing else. Can FSP's first effort dethrone the EVO as a budget favorite? To this end we will see exactly how the Windale 4 and 6 perform against Cooler Master's venerable air cooler with a toasty Intel Core i7-7700K supplying the load temps (and my trusty SPL meter along for the ride to capture noise levels).

We will get right into it with a summary of the specifications for both FSP Windale coolers:


Windale 4 (model AC401)

  • Heatsink Material: Aluminum Alloy
  • Heat-pipe: 6 mm x4
  • Fan Speed: 600-1600 RPM (PWM) ± 15%
  • Bearing Type: Sleeve Bearing
  • Fan Air Flow: 60 CFM ± 10%
  • Dimensions (LxWxH): 122 x 83 x 158 mm
  • Weight: 620 g

Windale 6 (model AC601 - blue LED)

  • Heatsink Material: Aluminum Alloy with black plating
  • Heat-pipe: 6 mm x 6
  • Fan Speed 600-1600 RPM (PWM) ± 15%
  • Bearing Type: Sleeve Bearing
  • Fan Air Flow: 60 CFM ± 10%
  • Dimensions (LxWxH): 122 x 110 x 165 mm
  • Weight: 823 g

Continue reading our review of the FSP Windale 4 and 6 coolers!

Thermaltake's $25 Contac Silent 12 heatsink for Ryzen

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 14, 2017 - 03:15 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Contac Silent 12, ryzen, AM4, amd, heatsink, air cooler

Thermaltake has a new cooler for those planning a Ryzen build on a budget, or for quiet system builds.  The Contac Silent 12 is a mere 153x12x100.3mm in size, with the fan attached, and weighs a paltry 700g however it is capable of almost matching the performance of AMD's Wraith cooler while operating at a noticeably quieter level.  In addition to the heatsink you will find a 'low-noise cable' which changes the fans RPM span from 500-1500 RPM to 400-1100 RPM however in their tests The Tech Report found it had little effect on the noise produced by a system under load.  See the full results here.

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"Thermaltake's Contac Silent 12 relies on an established design and a simple mounting system to get AMD Socket AM4 builders up and running as quickly as possible. We tested this cooler at stock and overclocked speeds to see how it stacks up for just $25."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Run softly and carry a big Scythe

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 6, 2017 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged: scythe, Mugen 5, air cooler

Scythe's Mugen 5 has a bit of a list to one side, which is designed to give your RAM a little more breathing room and will fit on motherboards with very little clearance between the socket and the DIMMs.  At 890g and 130x110x154.5mm it is not the largest cooler on the market but is big enough to warrant attention when picking out a case to install your system in.  [H]ard|OCP's tests show this cooler to be more focused the audibility of the cooler than topping the cooling charts, heavy overclockers will be better served by a different cooler but those building a quiet system should check out the full review.

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"The Mugen 5 is one of the larger CPU air coolers you will find on the market, and with that is has an "asymmetric design for maximum memory compatibility," so it does not extend deep into DIMM territory. The polished copper baseplate, as well as the rest of the HSF is nickel plated. Also we have a newly engineered mounting mechanism."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: [H]ard|OCP

LEPA's Neopets, colourful coolers to take care of your system

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 3, 2017 - 02:12 PM |
Tagged: lepa, NEOllusion RGB, air cooler, RGB

LEPA have launched a new series of air coolers, the NEOllusion RGB which comes with a remote control so you can create a fancy light show inside your case.  The screenshots at [H]ard|OCP show that the lights the heatsink produces are quite bright and will certainly be visible even from a distance.  For those of you who are more interested in cooling performance than pretty lights, the NEOllusion stands 126x40x161.7mm, with a 120mm fan and a recommended max TDP of 200W.  Tests show the cooler favours form over function, keeping temperatures in control but not offering competitive performance; it does prefer visual impact over audio effects as it is one of the quietest coolers [H] have tested.  If you are the type to desire a quiet light show in your case, check out the full review.

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"LEPA comes to us today with a new air cooler that is specifically focused on users that are looking for a little more bling inside their desktop computer build. And while really cool lights may or may not be your thing, we wanted to see just how the NEOllusion performed when it comes to its primary function, CPU cooling."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP