Alphacool's Eisbaer Extreme 280mm, it's not called extreme for no reason

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 4, 2019 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: Alphacool, Eisbaer Extreme 280, AIO, watercooler

Experienced watercooling enthusiasts will know at a glance why there are thick parts on the tubing of the Alphacool Eisbaer Extreme CPU cooler; they are quick release fittings.  This allows you to expand your cooling loop to include a graphics card or a motherboard with integral watercooling or just about anything else you might want.  To ensure it can handle that extra heat the radiator is noticeably larger than your average 280mm rad, at 385.5x156x64mm. 

When testing KitGuru revealed this is a cooler for overclockers, at stock speeds their results show its performance to be in the middle of the pack but once the i7-7700K was overclocked to 5GHz it was unbeatable and still quiet.

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"These pre-built, pre-filled units share a lot in common with custom water-cooling loops, primarily in that they can be disassembled or expanded. With the Alphacool Eisbaer Extreme priced at just under £230, is it worth the money?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Kitguru

A little cost savings on a SilentiumPC LCS

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 1, 2019 - 03:26 PM |
Tagged: watercooling, SilentiumPC, Navis RGB 240, Navis RGB 280, AIO, LCS

These two coolers from SilentiumPC run a little cheaper than many kits of similar size on the market, which might indicate they are not quite up to snuff or that they are a great bargain.  The Guru of 3D is here to help, by offering you their results and removing that mystery.  As you should expect, the 280mm kit offers better cooling results and generates less noise, though the 240mm kit still handled their i7-8700 without issue.  While these two coolers did not top the performance charts they do offer solid performance at a decent cost, as you can see for yourself.

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"Priced at 65 and 75 EUR we take a peek at two new AIO coolers from SilentiumPC: the Navis RGB 240 and 280 mm variants. These are the latest products from this Polish company known mainly for their chassis, power supplies and air coolers."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Guru of 3D

H2O Captain, my Captain we are Ryzen from the Deepcool

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 22, 2018 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, AIO, watercooling, Captain 240 EX, amd, Intel

The DeepCool Captain 240 EX White is an AiO watercooler, with a 240mm radiator which is available in both RGB and non-RGB models.  It is designed to cool most modern chips, apart from ThreadRipper, and [H]ard|OCP tested it with a Ryzen 7 1700 overclocked to 3.9 GHz @ 1.475V.  The results were interesting, to say the least, so make sure to drop by before falling in love with this particular cooler.

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"Deepcool states its mission is to provide "the best and personalized thermal solutions." Its Captain EX series of AIO CPU coolers has what it calls a "Steam Punk" look with visible liquid flow, but what we are most concerned with is just how well it cools our overclocked and over-volted Ryzen 7 processor. And it has "anti-explosion" rubber material."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Corsair has launched a pair of new liquid CPU coolers in their Hydro Series lineup, with the H100i (240 mm) and H115i (280 mm) RGB PLATINUM. These coolers feature an array of customizable RGB LED lighting, not to mention things like optimized copper cold plates and high-performance pump designs. We have the larger of the two coolers in for some launch-day benchmarking, so let's check out this new 280 mm H115i PLATINUM!

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"The CORSAIR Hydro Series H115i RGB PLATINUM is an all-in-one liquid CPU cooler built for extreme cooling with a 280mm radiator and vivid RGB lighting from 24 LEDs. Two CORSAIR ML PRO RGB 140mm PWM fans run up to 2,000 RPM, alongside an optimized cold plate and pump design that delivers the high performance Hydro Series cooling. Take control with CORSAIR iCUE software to customize lighting effects and enable Zero RPM mode at low temperatures. Easy to install and compatible with most modern CPU sockets, the H115i RGB PLATINUM pairs killer looks with chiller performance."

Specifications:

  • Coldplate Material: Copper
  • Tubing Material: Low permeation with black sleeving
  • Radiator Material: Aluminum
  • Radiator Size: 322 x 137 x 27 mm
  • Fan included: 2x ML PRO RGB 140 mm PWM Fans
  • Fan Max Speed: 2000 RPM
  • Fan Airflow: 97 CFM
  • Fan Static Pressure: 3.0 mm-H2O
  • Fan Noise Level: 37 dBA

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Pricing and Availability:

  • Hydro Series H100i RGB PLATINUM: $159.99 MSRP (launching November 1)
  • Hydro Series H115i RGB PLATINUM $169.99 MSRP (launching November 1)

Continue reading our review of the Corsair Hydro Series H115i PLATINUM liquid cooler!

Cooler Master's ML360R RGB, how hard a frag could a disco light frag if a ...

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 30, 2018 - 03:19 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, ML360R RGB, AIO

The Cooler Master ML360R RGB all in one cooler features a radiator with three 120mm fans.  Installation of the cooler was easy for [H]ard|OCP but there is an extra step as you have to connect the 5-way ARGB splitter for those Frag Harder Disco Lights ... or not.  From the acoustic results this is obviously a performance cooler; you will get very good temperatures under load but you will hear it in operation.  If you are looking to tilt the balance of your cooling systems in favour of cooler operation you should check this review out.

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"If it is Frag Harder Disco Lights you want, then Cooler Master ML360R RGB All-In-One CPU liquid cooler has that in spades. RGB is nice and all, but how does this AIO do where the rubber meets the road? We strap the ML360R RGB to our highly over-volted and overclocked Ryzen 7 processor and find out."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

EKWB offers Phoenix Down for your system with their new 360mm GPU and CPU watercooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 10, 2018 - 02:57 PM |
Tagged: watercooler, EKWB, EK-MLC Phoenix, AIO, 360mm radiator

If you have space in your case and a need to move a lot of heat, the 360mm EK-MLC Phoenix might be a good choice.  It comes with all the features you expect from EKWB, Vardar fans, quick connect tubing and compatibility with most modern sockets, including ThreadRipper with an extra attachment.   You will notice it can include the GPU in the cooling loop with the purchase of additional modules.  The investment is somewhat high, NikkTech priced it at 270 Euros for just the CPU and arund 400 Euros if you include the parts to cool your GPU.  Is that worth it? 

Check out the full review to see.

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"Following the massive success of the EK-XLC Predator line of AIO liquid coolers EK Waterblocks recently released the EK-MLC Phoenix line and on our test bench today we have the top of the line tri-fan 360 model."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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Source: Nikktech

The high powered and reasonably priced H100i Pro

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 20, 2018 - 01:25 PM |
Tagged: liquid cooler, H100i PRO, Hydro Series, H100i, h100, cpu cooler, corsair, AIO, 240mm, iCUE

You've likely seen Sebastian's review of the Corsair H100i in which he failed to provide the exact barometric pressure or even altitude above sea level, merely showing the delta between the base temperature and sound pressure of the room and that of the cooler.  The Tech Report on the other hand offer you insight into the quality of the sound the fan produces as well as the pump.  They also compare the performance to a different cooler, the Aerocool P7-L24 so check out their review

If that doesn't satisfy your aesthetic desires there are more reviews below the fold.

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"Corsair refreshed its closed-loop liquid coolers earlier this year with the Hydro Pro series. Those 280-mm and 360-mm liquid coolers boasted bold RGB LED lighting and a fresh design, and they turned in good performance, too. We go hands-on with the 240-mm H100i Pro to see whether Corsair can close out the hat trick."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction and First Impressions

Corsair’s Hydro Series H100 all-in-one liquid cooler has been a mainstay on the market for years now, with iterative updates to add features such as software integration. With this new H100i PRO, now joining the ranks of the existing H115i PRO and H150i PRO, the venerable cooler has again been revised, and this time RGB lighting is featured - though a subtle integration.

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“The CORSAIR Hydro Series H100i PRO is an all-in-one RGB liquid CPU cooler with a 240mm radiator built for low-noise cooling performance and bold styling with an RGB LED pump head. Two included 120mm ML Series magnetic levitation PWM fans provide great airflow and static pressure, with a wide PWM speed control range between 400 RPM and 2,400 RPM.

Powerful CORSAIR iCUE software lets you customize RGB lighting, monitor temperatures and precisely adjust fan speeds, or stop fans entirely with the H100i’s Zero RPM fan mode. Easy to install and compatible with most major CPU sockets, the H100i makes it easy to cool your system in silence and style.”

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The RGB lighting effect can be adjusted to any color using the iCUE software


Specifications from Corsair:

  • Coldplate Material: Copper
  • Tubing Material: Low permeation with black sleeving
  • Radiator Material: Aluminum
  • Radiator Size: 276mm x 120mm x 27mm
  • Fan(s) included: 2x ML Series 120mm PWM Fans
  • Fan Max Speed: 2400 RPM
  • Fan Airflow: 75 CFM
  • Fan Static Pressure: 4.2 mm-H2O
  • Fan Noise Level: 37 dB(A)

Pricing and Availability:

Continue reading our review of the Corsair Hydro Series H100i PRO liquid CPU cooler!

Cause a Disco Inferno with CM's MasterLiquid ML240R RGB

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 22, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, ML240R RGB, MasterLiquid, AIO, watercooler

The Frag Harder Disco Lights are back, Cooler Master's ML240 RGB lets you have a party in your parts.  In the package you get 4 pin RGB extension cable, a 3 pin RGB extension cable, a 3-way 3 pin RGB splitter, four 3 pin and one 4 pin RGB connectors, which connect to the physical ARGB Controller.  The buttons give you total control over the speed and patterns of your RGBs, and you can use the ARGB Lighting Control Software to program your own preferred display.

Confusingly, the package [H]ard|OCP received also contained some sort of radiator, with a round plate connected by two hoses ... you can see what they did with those in this article.

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"Cooler Master's claim to fame with the ML240R RGB is, you guessed it, "THE MOST COLORFUL WAY TO COOL." Its Master Liquid series has recently gotten high praise from us when it comes to keeping your CPU cool using an All-In-One cooler. Cooler Master has taken its successful model and adorned it with lots of Frag Harder Disco Lights."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Computex 2018: Cooler Master Shows Off Prototype Thermoelectric (TEC) AIO Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 13, 2018 - 07:39 PM |
Tagged: thermoelectric, TEC, liquid cooling, cooler master, computex 2018, computex, AIO

In addition to cases and massive amounts of RGB Cooler Master had a prototype closed loop cooler on display at Computex that combines an all in one liquid cooling loop with a TEC element that cools the water to sub-ambient temperatures.

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TechPowerUp snapped photos from the show floor.

Thermoelectric coolers aren't anything new (and this isn't Cooler Master's first foray with TECs), but the hybrid approach is an interesting one. The AIO loop appears to work like a water chiller cooler would with the TEC not having direct contact with the processor but rather it is used to give the single 120mm liquid loop radiator a boost by pulling lots of heat out of the water before hitting the radiator. According to Computex attendees the loop order flows from the CPU block to the TEC element where water is passed across one side of the side and the other hot side is cooled by a large heatsink which uses four heatpipes and dual fin stacks along with two fans in a package about the size of a 240mm radiator. From there, the chilled water passes through a traditional water cooling radiator and then the cool water goes to the CPU block.

The thermoelectric cooler uses the Peltier effect where electricity (DC) is passed between an array of thermocouples that sit between two layers (usually ceramics) creating an effect where heat is drawn from one side to the other with the cool side able to be cooled below ambient temperatures while the hot side needs to be cooled by a heatsink to prevent it from overheating and reducing efficiency and/or damaging the materials.

According to PC World, Cooler Master has stated that their prototype TEC will be rated at 300W TDP which is quite a bit higher than the approximately 180W of a 240mm traditional AIO. Gordon Mah Ung was able to perform some cursory testing with a FLIR camera attached to his smartphone where he saw the cooler demonstrate its ability to cool the water used in the loop 10 to 15-degrees below ambient where it was around 80°F (~26.7°C) in the packed Computex show floor and 64 to 70°F for the water as measured by the FLIR when pointing at the radiator and tubing. Further, Cooler Master had a temperature probe at the CPU block where it measured 20°C (likely no heat load as no processor was hooked up heh). This boosted cooling performance does come with a tradeoff, however. The TEC's hot side will need to be cooled (noise) and the TEC itself will draw as much as 150W of power (it will use standard connectors that a PC PSU can drive) in order to work its cooling magic (so higher electricity usage/cost).

My first thought was that the hybrid cooler could prove useful in a SFF system by offering cooling potential that would just otherwise not be possible in the form factor with the thinking that the cooler would not need to cool to crazy low temperatures, but just enough to match the performance of a much larger water cooling loop. Gordon Mah Ung from PC World also posits that the cooler would be useful in situations where ambient temperatures are very high (say, summer months in the south with no or underpowered AC) as the TEC would be able to keep processor temperatures in check (allowing enthusiasts to maintain their overclock or at least keep stock clocks and Turbo Boost without thermal throttling) where air cooling or water cooling cannot as the best they can do is cool to ambient.

Apparently, the hybrid cooler will also be able to push things if you do want to go for higher overclocks for benchmarking runs or improved gaming performance.

One concern with thermoelectric and other sub-ambient cooling methods is condensation which can build up on the outside of cool parts like the tubing and blocks and can potentially cause instability or damage to PC components. Traditionally, the tubing and area around the CPU socket would need to be insulated to protect from this. Cooler Master's design, I don't think, is immune to this but by moving the TEC away from the processor and using it to cool the water (so no direct contact), it is allegedly much less of an issue and if the TEC is just used to provide a bit of a boost to the water loop rather than going for as low temperatures as possible the risk should be minimal.

There is no word on specific pricing or release dates, but several sites are reporting that it will be available later this year with "competitive pricing". I would guess this cooler is going to be at the high end of water cooling AIOs and expandable kits at minimum which is to say probably around $300+. (Looking on Amazon, EKWB kit with 360mm radiator is $370, you can find kits with 240mm radiators for between two-to-three hundred dollars, and a used custom loop starts around there if you find a forum deal.)

What do you think about this cooler? I am interested in seeing the reviews on this and whether it is able to combine the best of both water and TEC cooling worlds.

Also read: 

Source: PC World