Allied Control Showing Off Immersion Cooling at SC17

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 20, 2017 - 10:09 PM |
Tagged: Supercomputing Conference, supercomputing, liquid cooling, immersion cooling, HPC, allied control, 3M

PC Gamer Hardware (formerly Maximum PC) spotted a cool immersion cooling system being shown off at the SuperComputing conference in Denver, Colorado earlier this month. Allied Control who was recently acquired by BitFury (popular for its Bitcoin mining ASICs) was at the show with a two phase immersion cooling system that takes advantage of 3M's Novec fluid and a water cooled condesor coil to submerge and cool high end and densely packed hardware with no moving parts and no pesky oil residue.

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Nick Knupffer (@Nick_Knupffer) posted a video (embedded below) of the cooling system in action cooling a high end processor and five graphics cards. The components are submerged in a non-flamable, non-conductive fluid that has a very low boiling point of 41°C. Interestingly, the heatsinks and fans are removed allowing for direct contact between the fluid and the chips (in this case there is a copper baseplate on the CPU but bare ASICs can also be cooled). When the hardware is in use, heat is transfered to the liquid which begins to boil off from a liquid to a vapor / gaseous state. The vapor rises to the surface and hits a condensor coil (which can be water cooled) that cools the gas until it turns back into a liquid and falls back into the tank. The company has previously shown off an overclocked 20 GPU (250W) plus dual Xeon system that was able to run flat out (The GPUs at 120% TDP) running deep learning as well as mining Z-Cash when not working on HPC projects while keeping all the hardware well under thermal limits and not throttling. Cnet also spotted a 10 GPU system being shown off at Computex (warning autoplay video ad!).

According to 3M, two phase immersion cooling is extremely efficient (many times more than air or even water) and can enable up to 95% lower energy cooling costs versus conventional air cooling. Further, hardware can be packed much more tightly with up to 100kW/square meter versus 10kW/sq. m with air meaning immersion cooled hardware can take up to 10% less floor space and the heat produced can be reclaimed for datacenter building heating or other processes.

 

 

Neat stuff for sure even if it is still out of the range of home gaming PCs and mining rigs for now! Speaking of mining BitFury plans to cool a massive 40+ MW ASIC mining farm in the Republic of Georgia using an Allied Control designed immersion cooling system (see links below)!

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Source: PC Gamer

He ain't heavy, he's my server. Iceotope's full immersion cabinents are hitting the market

Subject: General Tech | November 19, 2014 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: Novec, mineral oil, liquid cooling, Iceotope, 3M, PetaGen

It has been over a year since we last heard from Iceotope and their total immersion cooling system for servers but they have finally hit the market with the PetaGen liquid cooling system.  Using 3M's inert liquid which is branded Novec and after working with Intel to ensure the system can handle high end processors they are ready to launch a series of cabinets and products to sell to data centers, or at least ones with heavily reinforced flooring.  The weight could be a drawback for their sales people, not only are false floors going to be unfeasible there is a good chance the density of a totally immersed server will require serious support to resist the lure of gravity.  The investment could be worth it, their original claims seem to have been accurate and their system can reduce the cost of cooling your servers from about 50% of your operating cost down to 2%.  More attractive for some is that the waste heat is dumped into water which can heat to around 45C, enough to be recycled for building heating and other purposes to further lower a businesses operating costs.  Drop by The Inquirer for a bit of the history and more information on the company that is making mineral oil obsolete.

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"BRITISH SERVER COOLING FIRM Iceotope has developed a cooling system in partnership with Intel designed for high performance computing and supercomputing."

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Source: The Inquirer

Move over mineral oil, Iceotope has Novec

Subject: General Tech | March 1, 2013 - 02:57 PM |
Tagged: Novec, mineral oil, liquid cooling, Iceotope, 3M

The demonstration video for Novec from Iceotope features a full submerged and functioning iPhone, as well as a less expensive phone, neither of which suffered at all from being dunked in the non-conductive liquid; you should probably wipe them off before using them though.  This project from Leeds University claims an 80-97% improvement in cooling efficiency over air cooling though they do not compare it to mineral oil or other exotic cooling solutions.  Head over to The Register for a look at the demonstration video.

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"We've seen quite a few innovative engineers who have tried to bring down data centre cooling costs, including this mad crowd who dunked theirs in a deep fryer... Now boffins at Leeds University and British start-up Icetope have invented a super cooling liquid that could create a new generation of "wet servers". They say it could cut the cooling costs of the world's server farms by 97 per cent."

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Source: The Register