Micron Launches 32GB NVDIMM-N - Intel Announces 3D XPoint NVDIMM

Subject: Storage | November 15, 2017 - 09:59 PM |
Tagged: NVDIMM, XPoint, 3D XPoint, 32GB, NVDIMM-N, NVDIMM-F, NVDIMM-P, DIMM

We're finally starting to see NVDIMM materialize beyond the unobtanium. Micron recently announced 32GB NVDIMM-N:

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These come with 32GB of DRAM plus 64GB of SLC NAND flash.

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These are in the NVDIMM-N form factor and can offer some very impressive latency improvements over other non-volatile storage methods.

Next up is Intel, who recently presented at the UBS Global Technology Conference:

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We've seen Intel's Optane in many different forms, and now it looks like we finally have a date for 3D XPoint DIMMs - 2nd half of 2018! There are lots of hurdles to overcome as the JEDEC spec is not yet finalized (and might not be by the time this launches). Motherboard and BIOS support also needs to be more widely adopted for this to take off as well.

Don't expect this to be in your desktop machine anytime soon, but one can hope!

Press blast for the Micron 32GB NVDIMM-N appears after the break.

X points to the spot; in 3D!

Subject: Storage | July 18, 2017 - 07:31 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, srt, rst, Optane Memory, Optane, Intel, hybrid, CrossPoint, cache, 32GB, 16GB

It has been a few months since Al looked at Intel's Optane and its impressive performance and price.  This is why it seems appropriate to revist the 2280 M.2 stick with a PCIe 3.0 x2 interface.  It is not just the performance which is interesting but the technology behind Optane and the limitations.  For anyone looking to utilize Optane is is worth reminding you of the compatibility limitations Intel requires, only Kaby Lake processors with Core i7, i5 or i3 heritage.  If you do qualify already or are planning a system build, you can revisit the performance numbers over at Kitguru.

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"Optane is Intel’s brand name for their 3D XPoint memory technology. The first Optane product to break cover was the Optane PC P4800X, a very high-performance SSD aimed at the Enterprise segment. Now we have the second product using the technology, this time aimed at the consumer market segment – the Intel Optane Memory module."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Kitguru

Glowing RAM from G.Skill to match all your other RGBs

Subject: Memory | May 4, 2017 - 02:01 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill, G.Skill Trident Z, 32GB, ddr4-3200, RGB

What is the point of light emanating from all of your components from keyboard to PSU if your RAM doesn't match?  G.Skill realized this is a pressing issue on the minds of enthusiasts everywhere and infected their Trident Z RAM with RGB-itis.  The four modules in this 32GB kit have a total of 16 LEDs which can glow together or separately using the G.Skill control utility, which is still in Beta and caused some minor headaches for Kitguru.  You can see the lights here, as well as some benchmarks if you are more into that kind of thing.

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"Take a really close look and you will see the G.Skill logo is carried on a plastic diffuser that covers the LEDs, instead of the aluminium heat spreader, however that is the only clue that this DDR4 memory packs four RGB LEDs on each module."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Kitguru

Spent all your money on a new CPU and couldn't afford an SSD? Intel Optane Memory is here

Subject: Storage | April 24, 2017 - 05:20 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, srt, rst, Optane Memory, Optane, Intel, hybrid, CrossPoint, cache, 32GB, 16GB

At $44 for 16GB or $77 for a 32GB module Intel's Optane memory will cost you less in total for an M.2 SSD, though a significantly higher price per gigabyte.  The catch is that you need to have a Kaby Lake Core system to be able to utilize Optane, which means you are unlikely to be using a HDD.  Al's test show that Optane will also benefit a system using an SSD, reducing latency noticeably although not as significantly as with a HDD.

The Tech Report tested it differently, by sourcing a brand new desktop system with Kaby Lake Core APU that did not ship with an SSD.  Once installed, the Optane drive enabled the system to outpace an affordable 480GB SSD in some scenarios; very impressive for a HDD.  They also did peek at the difference Optane makes when paired with aforementioned affordable SSD in their full review.

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"Intel's Optane Memory tech purports to offer most of the responsiveness of an SSD to systems whose primary storage device is a good old hard drive. We put a 32GB stick of Optane Memory to the test to see whether it lives up to Intel's claims."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel

Introduction, Specifications, and Requirements

Introduction:

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Finally! Optane Memory sitting in our lab! Sure, it’s not the mighty P4800X we remotely tested over the past month, but this is right here, sitting on my desk. It’s shipping, too, meaning it could be sitting on your desk (or more importantly, in your PC) in just a matter of days.

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The big deal about Optane is that it uses XPoint Memory, which has fast-as-lightning (faster, actually) response times of less than 10 microseconds. Compare this to the fastest modern NAND flash at ~90 microseconds, and the differences are going to add up fast. What’s wonderful about these response times is that they still hold true even when scaling an Optane product all the way down to just one or two dies of storage capacity. When you consider that managing fewer dies means less work for the controller, we can see latencies fall even further in some cases (as we will see later).

Read on for our full review of Optane Memory!

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Lexar

The Need for Speed

Around here storage is Allyn’s territory, but I decided to share my experience with a new $20 flash drive I picked up that promised some impressive speeds via USB 3.0. The drive is the Lexar JumpDrive P20, and I bought the 32GB version, which is the lowest capacity of the three drives in the series. 64GB and 128GB versions of the JumpDrive P20 are available, with advertised speeds of up to 400 MB/s from all three, and reads and up to 270 MB/s writes - if you buy the largest capacity.

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My humble 32GB model still boasts up to 140 MB/s writes, which would be faster than any USB drive I’ve ever owned (my SanDisk Extreme USB 3.0 16GB drive is limited to 60 MB/s writes, and can hit about 190 MB/s reads), and the speeds of the P20 even approach that of some lower capacity SATA 3 SSDs - if it lives up to the claims. The price was right, so I took the plunge. (My hard-earned $20 at stake!)

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Size comparison with other USB flash drives on hand (P20 on far right)

First we'll look at the features from Lexar:


  • Among the fastest USB flash drives available, with speeds up to 400MB/s read and 270MB/s write
  • Sleek design with metal alloy base and high-gloss mirror finish top
  • Securely protects files using EncryptStick Lite software, an advanced security solution with 256-bit AES encryption
  • Reliably stores and transfers files, photos, videos, and more
  • High-capacity options to store more files on the go
  • Compatible with PC and Mac systems
  • Backwards compatible with USB 2.0 devices
  • Limited lifetime warranty

Continue reading our review of the Lexar JumpDrive P20 USB drive!!

Samsung Crams Entire 512GB NVMe SSD Into Single BGA Chip Package

Subject: Storage | May 31, 2016 - 03:38 PM |
Tagged: TurboWrite, Samsung, PM971-NVMe, BGA, 512GB, 48-layer, 32GB, 256Gbit

Have you ever checked out one of those laptops with the soldered-on eMMC SSD, where the manufacturer was basically checking the 'SSD' box for forgetting the 'Performance' box entirely? What if I told you that it was possible to fit an entire PCIe NVMe SSD with performance comparable to a 950 Pro into a package similar to those eMMC parts?

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Source: Samsung

FMS 2015: *UPDATED* Samsung Adds Layers to its 3D VNAND, Doubling Capacity While Reducing Power Consumption

Subject: Storage | August 11, 2015 - 04:39 PM |
Tagged: vnand, tlc, Samsung, FMS 2015, 48-layer, 32GB, 32-layer, 256Gbit

FMS 2015: Samsung Adds Layers to its 3D VNAND, Doubling Capacity While Reducing Power Consumption

Samsung recently added 2TB capacity parts to their 850 EVO SATA SSDs, but today’s announcement may double that. Today at Flash Memory Summit, Samsung has announced a new iteration on their 3D VNAND technology.

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Cross section of Samsung 32-layer VNAND. (TechInsights)

The announcement is a new TLC 3D VNAND (the type present in the 850 EVO Series). The new parts consist of an updated die with the following improvements:

  • 48 layer VNAND - up from 32 layers of the previous generation
  • 256Gbit (32GB) capacity - up from 128Gbit (16GB) capacity of 32-layer VNAND
  • 30% reduction in power consumption over 32-layer VNAND

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Samsung’s new 48-layer VNAND.

I suspected Samsung would go this route in order to compete with the recent announcements from Intel/Micron and SanDisk. Larger die capacities may not be the best thing for keeping performance high in smaller capacity SSDs (a higher number of smaller capacity dies helps there), but it is definitely a good capability to have since higher capacity per die translates to more efficient flash die production.

The Samsung keynote is at noon today (Pacific), and I will update this piece with any photos relevant to the announcement after that keynote.

*UPDATE*

I just got out of the Samsung keynote. There were some additional slides with data relevant to this post:

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This image simply shows the additional vertical stacking, but adds that Samsung has this new flash in production right now.

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The new higher capacity dies enable 1.4x greater density per wafer (realize that this does not mean more dies per wafer, as the image incorrectly suggests).

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The power consumption improvements (right) were in the press release, however the speed improvements (left) were not. A 2x improvement in per-die speeds means that Samsung should not see a performance hit if they migrate their existing 128Gbit TLC VNAND SSDs over to these new 256Gbit parts. Speaking of which...

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Not only is this new VNAND being produced *this month*, Samsung is retrofitting their 850 EVO line with the new parts. Again, we expect no performance delta but will likely retest these new versions just to double check for any outliers.

There was some more great info from the keynote, but that will appear in another post later today.

Samsung’s press blast appears after the break.

Source: Samsung

G.Skill would like to know if you can handle 32GB of DDR3-2400

Subject: Memory | February 7, 2013 - 07:13 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill Trident X, DDR3-2400, 32GB, dual channel

At $280 the 32GB kit of DDR3-2400 RAM from G.Skill costs more than an SSD but if you consider what you would have paid for 4GB of DDR3 when it first hit the market you can't argue that the price of a kit like this has fallen drastically.  The timings are not even particularly loose for DIMMs of this speed, 10-12-12-31 @ 2T is not too shabby, though Neoseeker didn't have much luck tightening them as they couldn't get to the fully rated speed of the DIMMs due to their motherboard not being able to support that speed.  Keep note of that, many motherboards simply do not have 2400MHz as a choice in the BIOS and many CPUs won't be able to keep these DIMMs fully active.  You could always opt for using a goodly chunk of the memory as a RAM drive, no matter what speed your BIOS supports.  Check the full review here.

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"Today I will be looking at G. Skill's Trident X DDR3 2400MHz 32GB quad channel memory kit. With their goal of extreme overclocking performance, G. Skill uses the highest quality memory IC's available when manufacturing their memory. To ensure trouble-free operation, their memory undergoes rigorous testing to verify their craftsmanship and performance."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Big memory from Mushkin ... 16 or 32GB, your choice

Subject: Memory | August 14, 2012 - 04:18 PM |
Tagged: ridgeback, redline, Mushkin, ddr3-1866, 32GB, 16GB

You can pick up two DIMMs with the 16GB kit or four with the 32GB, either way you end up with DDR3-1866MHz @ 10-10-10-27 running on 1.5v, with a lifetime warranty to boot!  When Overclockers Club went to work the two kits did end up showing some difference as the 16GB kit hit 2288MHz @ 11-11-12-28 2T while the 32GB only managed 2202MHz @ 11-12-12-28 2T.  If you check out the Mushkin Redline series on NewEgg you will see a wide variety of models, so pick the ones with the lowest latency for the best performance out of the box as well as more overclocking headroom.

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"Looking at these two kits of memory from Mushkin shows that it has another pair of kits that deliver performance indicative of their specifications and more. First up are the distinctive good looks and functionality of the cooling solutions employed on each kit. The 32GB kit part number 994071 uses the "Ridgeback" design. This robust heatsink package uses a series of angle shaped (think Mushkin logo) fins on top of a thick body to effectively wick away the thermal load generated by these high density modules. Packing them into a four DIMM configuration like used in the testing will allow a higher heat load to be retained but is nothing to be concerned about. Using an air cooled CPU cooling solution would fix that issue as once air starts moving over the modules they cool down fast."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory