I loaded sixteen gigs of HBM2 ...

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 7, 2019 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: VRAM, video card, Vega 20, Vega, radeon vii, radeon, pcie, opencl, HBM2, graphics card, gaming, compute, amd, 7nm, 16GB

While enjoying the pictures and tests Sebastian ran on the new AMD Radeon VII, was there a game that we missed that is near and dear to your heart?  Then perhaps one of these reviews below will solve that, the list even includes Linux performance for those on that side of the silicon.  For instance, over at The Tech Report you can check out Monster Hunter: World, Forza Horizon 4 and the impressive results that the new 7nm card offers in Battlefield V. 

Check those results here.

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"AMD's Radeon VII is the first gaming graphics card powered by a 7 nm GPU: Vega 20. This hopped-up Vega chip comes linked up with 16 GB of HBM2 RAM good for 1 TB/s of memory bandwidth. We put this potent combination to the test to see if it can beat out Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Manufacturer: AMD

Overview and Specifications

After a month-long wait following its announcement during the AMD keynote at CES, the Radeon VII is finally here. By now you probably know that this is the world’s first 7nm gaming GPU, and it is launching today at a price equal to NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 2080 at $699.

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The AMD Radeon VII in action on the test bench

More than a gaming card, the Radeon VII is being positioned as a card for content creators as well by AMD, with its 16GB of fast HBM2 memory and enhanced compute capabilities complimenting what should be significantly improved gaming performance compared to the RX Vega 64.

Vega at 7nm

At the heart of the Radeon VII is the Vega 20 GPU, introduced with the Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 compute cards for the professional market back in November. The move to 7nm brings a reduction in die size from 495 mm2 with Vega 10 to 331 mm2 with Vega 20, but this new GPU is more than a die shrink with the most notable improvement by way of memory throughput, as this is significantly higher with Vega 20.

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Double the HBM2, more than double the bandwidth

While effective memory speeds have been improved only slightly from 1.89 Gbps to 2.0 Gbps, far more impactful is the addition of two 4GB HBM2 stacks which not only increase the total memory to 16GB, but bring with them two additional memory controllers which double the interface width from 2048-bit to 4096-bit. This provides a whopping 1TB (1024 GB/s) of memory bandwidth, up from 483.8 GB/s with the RX Vega 64.

Continue reading our review of the AMD Radeon VII graphics card!

X points to the spot; in 3D!

Subject: Storage | July 18, 2017 - 07:31 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, srt, rst, Optane Memory, Optane, Intel, hybrid, CrossPoint, cache, 32GB, 16GB

It has been a few months since Al looked at Intel's Optane and its impressive performance and price.  This is why it seems appropriate to revist the 2280 M.2 stick with a PCIe 3.0 x2 interface.  It is not just the performance which is interesting but the technology behind Optane and the limitations.  For anyone looking to utilize Optane is is worth reminding you of the compatibility limitations Intel requires, only Kaby Lake processors with Core i7, i5 or i3 heritage.  If you do qualify already or are planning a system build, you can revisit the performance numbers over at Kitguru.

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"Optane is Intel’s brand name for their 3D XPoint memory technology. The first Optane product to break cover was the Optane PC P4800X, a very high-performance SSD aimed at the Enterprise segment. Now we have the second product using the technology, this time aimed at the consumer market segment – the Intel Optane Memory module."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Kitguru

Spent all your money on a new CPU and couldn't afford an SSD? Intel Optane Memory is here

Subject: Storage | April 24, 2017 - 05:20 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, srt, rst, Optane Memory, Optane, Intel, hybrid, CrossPoint, cache, 32GB, 16GB

At $44 for 16GB or $77 for a 32GB module Intel's Optane memory will cost you less in total for an M.2 SSD, though a significantly higher price per gigabyte.  The catch is that you need to have a Kaby Lake Core system to be able to utilize Optane, which means you are unlikely to be using a HDD.  Al's test show that Optane will also benefit a system using an SSD, reducing latency noticeably although not as significantly as with a HDD.

The Tech Report tested it differently, by sourcing a brand new desktop system with Kaby Lake Core APU that did not ship with an SSD.  Once installed, the Optane drive enabled the system to outpace an affordable 480GB SSD in some scenarios; very impressive for a HDD.  They also did peek at the difference Optane makes when paired with aforementioned affordable SSD in their full review.

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"Intel's Optane Memory tech purports to offer most of the responsiveness of an SSD to systems whose primary storage device is a good old hard drive. We put a 32GB stick of Optane Memory to the test to see whether it lives up to Intel's claims."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel

Introduction, Specifications, and Requirements

Introduction:

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Finally! Optane Memory sitting in our lab! Sure, it’s not the mighty P4800X we remotely tested over the past month, but this is right here, sitting on my desk. It’s shipping, too, meaning it could be sitting on your desk (or more importantly, in your PC) in just a matter of days.

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The big deal about Optane is that it uses XPoint Memory, which has fast-as-lightning (faster, actually) response times of less than 10 microseconds. Compare this to the fastest modern NAND flash at ~90 microseconds, and the differences are going to add up fast. What’s wonderful about these response times is that they still hold true even when scaling an Optane product all the way down to just one or two dies of storage capacity. When you consider that managing fewer dies means less work for the controller, we can see latencies fall even further in some cases (as we will see later).

Read on for our full review of Optane Memory!

Super fast two wheeler or a solid quadrunner? A tale of two RAM kits

Subject: Memory | October 15, 2015 - 05:30 PM |
Tagged: quad channel, patriot, G.Skill, dual channel, DDR4-3000, ddr4-2400, 16GB

MadShrimps recently wrapped up two reviews featuring 16GB DDR4 kits.  The first is the $170 G.SKILL DDR4-3000 kit with two 8GB modules and timings of 15-15-15-35 while the second is the $106 Patriot VIPER 4 Series DDR4-2400 which has four 4GB DIMMs and timings of 15-15-15-35.  This provides a great way to compare the performance delta between a quad channel kit with lower frequencies against a dual channel kit with higher frequencies.  As they have used the same tests and lowered the G.SKILL to comparable frequencies the results of the charts are quite informative and demonstrate how little performance difference there is between these two kits.

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"With the F4-3000C15D-16GVRB Ripjaws V kit from G.SKILL we will have the same memory capacity as the Patriot Viper 4 kit which we have recently reviewed, but with half the number of modules. The higher memory speed of 3000MHz at stock has also an impact on the operating voltage, which is now 1.35V instead of 1.2V and overclocking over this particular speed will usually need some extra voltage adjustments on the CPU side, a solid motherboard and UEFI construction but also a good CPU memory controller."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Mad Shrimps

Crucial's 16GB Ballistix Elite 2666MHz, great frequency at the cost of timings

Subject: Memory | July 23, 2015 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: ddr4-2666, crucial ballistix, 16GB

DDR4 has certainly ramped up the frequencies but as we have seen with previous generations of RAM, the timings tend to get looser as that frequency increases.  Take for example Crucial's 16GB DDR4-2666 kit which sports timings of CAS 16, tRCD 17, tRD 17 and tRFC 36.  Indeed to overclock the RAM to 2808MHz, Bjorn3D had to change the timings to 19-17-17-36, however at that speed it nosed slightly ahead of the Patriot kit running at 2800MHz @ 16-18-18-36 so tweaking this RAM can pay off and the Crucial Ballistix MOD Utility will let you know if you are getting into Kenny Loggins' areas.  At $170 it will not break the bank and it will beat out at least some of the competition in performance, albeit by a very slight margin.

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"In this review we are going to be looking at one of the many DDR4 modules that Crucial offers for the 2011v3 CPU platform: the 2666Mhz 16-17-17-36 16GBs DDR4 Ballistix Elite Memory. So step inside and see how this memory stacks up."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: Bjorn3D

G.Skill's Ripjaws 4; fast and relatively affordable memory for your Haswell-E system

Subject: Memory | April 27, 2015 - 04:45 PM |
Tagged: ddr4-3200, G.Skill, Ripjaws 4, 16GB

At $450 for 16GB of DDR4-3200, G.Skill's Ripjaws 4 kit is very well priced for DDR4 of that speed, especially if you like the active cooling fans.  This particular kit is has timings of 16-16-16-36 with a 2T command rate. It also requires an impressive 1.35V to hit full speed, well above the 1.2V specification but in line with many of the other DDR4 enthusiast kits.  Indeed when Hardware Canucks started their overclocking tests they raised that to 1.4V and managed a variety of tighter timings with reduced clock speed; worth noting is that all of those overclocks were successful when using a 1T command rate.  Check out their full review here and don't forget to sign up for our contest!

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"G.Skill's Ripjaws 4 DDR4-3200 16GB kit gives Haswell-E buyers an excellent combination of price, out-of-box performance and overclocking abilities. It has everything you could possibly want in a DDR4 kit."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Shave another couple of watts off your Kabini system

Subject: Memory | April 9, 2014 - 06:54 PM |
Tagged: kingston, kingston hyper x, Genesis LoVo, 16GB, ddr3-1600

If you were impressed by the low wattage required to run the AMD AM1 Athlon 5350 and are thinking of building a low power system along the lines of the one Josh used in his review Kingston has a product to help you lower that total system voltage a little more.  HyperX Genesis LoVo uses only a mere 1.35V to power the 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9 kit and their low profile helps if you are building a small sized system.  Performance at stock speeds is quite decent, with the possibility of overclocking to add more speed if you desire but these DIMMs are more about power savings than raw power.  Check out the full review at Funky Kit.

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"Even though higher clocked RAM is great for overclocking and gaming for most computer users, memory at lower clocks is good enough for the general tasks they perform daily. For those users, memory speed is usually less important than capacity so today we wish to present something more regular in the memory's world what is Kingston HyperX Genesis LoVo 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9. As probably some readers already noticed, we can't really call it regular memory as Kingston specified it to run at low voltage of 1.35V ... and it's green like most eco-friendly products."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit

Revisiting ultra fast DDR3; is it worth the price yet?

Subject: Memory | November 18, 2013 - 06:33 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-2400, patriot, Viper 3, Black Mamba, 16GB

Patriot's Viper 3 Black Mamba PC3-19200 16GB kit will set you back $225 to purchase which is a large premium over DDR3-1600.  Base timings of 11-11-11-28 are not that much higher than DDR3 which might help these DIMMs live up to their premium pricing as will Intel's XMP 1.3 memory profile.  To find out how it compares to other 2400MHz RAM as well as slower kits you can head over to Neoseeker to read their full review as well as see what kind of overclock they managed to attain.

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"Today we review Patriot's Viper 3 series Black Mamba PC3-19200 16B dual channel memory kit featuring low-profile heatspreaders and an Intel XMP profile."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker