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Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: Corsair

Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB Memory Review

After first teasing the product last month at CES, Corsair today is officially launching the latest edition of the company's flagship memory. The Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB is not only a new model of high performance DDR4 memory, it's also the first product to feature Corsair's new Capellix LED technology.

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The Dominator Platinum RGB line will be rolling out in 22 SKUs of varying capacity and performance, with clocks ranging from 3000MHz to 4800MHz and capacities between 16GB and 128GB. We were supplied with early access to the CMT32GX4M4C3200C14 SKU, a 32GB (4x8GB) kit clocked at 3200MHz with timings of 14-14-14-34.

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Read on to see how this memory performs, how far we could overclock it, and how the new Capellix LEDs look and work outside of the Corsair showroom.

Splish splash, my RAM was taking a bath! It's brand new from Thermaltake

Subject: Memory | February 4, 2019 - 03:25 PM |
Tagged: watercooling, ddr4, ddr4-3200, RGB

It took a bit of time but it was inevitable, some manufacturer was bound to add watercooling to their DDR4.  Thermaltake's 32GB DDR4-3200MHz WaterRAM RGB kit incorporates an RGB waterblock which attaches to the top of the DIMMs and can be incorporated into an existing cooling loop.  It certainly does cool the RAM, as KitGuru measured 38.1C without the block, 36.2C by adding the block and below 30C when hooked up to a full watercooling loop. 

As for the effect on performance, check out the full review.

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"The important thing here is that you don’t have to replace the heat sinks on the RAM modules with the attendant risk of damaging the ICs, and neither do you have to add a manifold as Thermaltake has done all the engineering for you."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Kitguru

CES 2019: HyperX QuadCast Microphone & Cloud Orbit S Headset

Subject: General Tech | January 10, 2019 - 10:56 PM |
Tagged: RGB, microphone, hyperx, headset, gaming mouse, gaming headset, ddr4, ces 2019, CES

HyperX is here at CES demoing several new products — including a new product category — as well as some updates to their existing product line. The highlights include the company's first microphone and a new premium gaming headset made with Audeze's planar magnetic drivers.

Check out the complete launch details below as well as our impressions from our visit to the HyperX suite at CES.

HyperX Pulsefire Raid Gaming Mouse

The HyperX Pulsefire Raid RGB mouse is designed for gamers who need additional buttons for key binding or to execute a variety of commands. HyperX Pulsefire Raid features 11 programmable buttons and is designed with a Pixart 3389 sensor for accuracy and speed with settings up to 16,000 DPI. Customizable native DPI settings allow gamers to monitor settings with an LED indicator. In addition, the mouse includes Omron switches with 20M click reliability. Pulsefire Raid is designed for accurate, fluid and responsive tracking, without acceleration. Using HyperX NGenuity software, gamers can assign personalized macro functions to the 11 programmable keys and store them in a macro library.

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Our impressions: The Pulsefire Raid Gaming Mouse doesn't do anything new in terms of basic design, but its 11 programmable buttons are more than found on many competing gaming mice and will be appreciated by competitive gamers looking to map as many in-game functions as possible.

The wired mouse feels good in the hand and includes nice RGB effects that can by configured via software or turned off if desired. The Pulsefire Raid includes the normal range of higher-quality components — Omron switches and a 16,000 DPI Pixart 3389 sensor — at a competitive price point of about $60. Recent purchasers of mid-range and higher gaming mice probably won't be tempted to switch, but if you're looking for a new gaming mouse or craving those additional programmable buttons, the HyperX Pulsefire Raid will be a nice choice at it expected price point when it launches in Q2.

HyperX QuadCast Microphone

The HyperX Quadcast is a standalone microphone designed to meet the exacting demands of PC, PlayStation 4, and Mac professional or aspiring streamers. The QuadCast features an anti-vibration shock mount, an easily-accessible gain control adjustment, four selectable polar patterns, and tap-to-mute functionality with convenient LED lighting to indicate broadcast status. With crystal clear voice capturing, Quadcast connects streamers to their viewers like never before.

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Our impressions: While we couldn't fully test the QuadCast's audio capabilities in a noisy CES demo suite, what we could hear sounded promising. Users have a choice of polar patterns, quick gain control via a dial on the bottom, a 3.5mm headphone output for live monitoring, and a tap-to-mute feature that indicates the mute status by turning off the microphone’s red light.

The QuadCast's stand is sturdy with a functional and attractive built-in shock mount. But it also comes with an adapter for mounting it to another microphone stand or arm. The QuadCast will be priced at $139 when it launches in Q2.

HyperX Cloud Orbit and Cloud Orbit S Headset

The Cloud Orbit and Cloud Orbit S gaming headsets are the first HyperX gaming headsets powered by Audeze’s patented 100mm Planar Magnetic Drivers for accurate sound. Waves Nx® 3D audio technology brings an immersive cinematic audio experience to gaming. The Cloud Orbit S includes Waves Nx® head tracking technology to deliver a stable hyper-realistic 360-degree audio environment where the user’s head movements bring the room to life 1,000 times a second. HyperX gaming headsets paired with Audeze and Waves technology bring audio quality to the next level with audio technology previously found only in audiophile headsets.

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Our impressions: HyperX is no stranger to gaming headsets, but the new Cloud Orbit series is their first project in collaboration with high-end audio company Audeze. The Cloud Orbit and Cloud Orbit S feature Audeze's planar magnetic drivers in a headset that eschews the common more "aggressive" gamer design for a subtle yet attractive black and gray look.

In addition to high quality sound from the planar magnetic drivers, the higher-end Cloud Orbit S features Waves NX 3D audio processing that can optionally position the user's audio sources via head tracking. When enabled, the current audio output is "placed" in a static position. When the user then turns their head, the headset uses head-tracking technology to pan the audio accordingly. In other words, the Waves Nx processing is simulating what it would sound like if you were sitting in a theater with multi-channel surround sound speakers and then turn your head to the side or behind.

We had a chance to demo Waves Nx on the Cloud Orbit S and the effect is quite realistic and impressive. But while it makes a great demo, we're not sure how many users would find a feature like this useful in the long-run since many users would prefer to have their audio "follow them" regardless of head positioning. However, we're hoping to get a chance to try it out more in a quieter environment.

Set to arrive in Q2, the Cloud Orbit S with head tracking will set you back $329 while the non-tracking Cloud Orbit will land at $299.

HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB Memory

The HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB is now available in 16GB modules in speeds of 3000MHz and 3200MHz as individual modules and kits of 2 and 4 up to 64GB. Predator DDR4 RGB features synchronized RGB lighting with HyperX Infrared Sync technology, allowing multiple modules to sync LED lighting and produce an exceptional color and pattern display. Powered directly from the motherboard, this patented technology provides an enhanced visual experience of RGB memory for gaming, overclocking PCs and DIY system builds.

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Our impressions: HyperX launched its Predator DDR4 RGB memory — which uses infrared light to sync RGB effects between modules — last year, but only in single-module capacities of up to 8GB. This of course limited the amount of memory users could install in their system, especially on desktop motherboards/chipsets which only feature two or four DIMM slots.

Now HyperX is adding a 16GB module to the product lineup, doubling the maximum amount of RAM that users of this product can fit into their builds. The new capacity will be available later this month starting at $167.

Source: HyperX

Bedazzle your system with G.SKILL's TridentZ Royal DDR4

Subject: Memory | January 3, 2019 - 03:21 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill, TridentZ Royal, ddr4, RGB

These new memory modules from G.SKILL are not dim; with eight individually controllable RGB lighting zones hidden behind the crystalline light bars topping the RAM.  They even include a microfiber cloth to polish those bars and the fancy gold or silver heatspreaders.  Of course, some users are not content with only pretty RAM and would like working modules, which is why the Guru of 3D benchmarked the DDR4-3200 kit

Ryzen users take note, these DIMMs easily hit 3466MHz with XMP enabled.

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"We review probably the most beautiful looking memory of 2018, it is fabbed at G.Skill. It's available in multiple frequencies and timings, we test the 3200 MHz kit. With XMP 2.0 memory profiles on Intel platforms as well as checking support for AMD Ryzen. Meet a memory type that sets and defines a whole new standard in style and design."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Guru of 3D

STH Goes Under the Heat Spreader with Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory

Subject: Storage | December 20, 2018 - 10:34 AM |
Tagged: storage, ram, Optane DC Persistent Memory, Optane, micron, memory, Intel, Hynix, flash, ddr4, 3D XPoint

ServeTheHome got up close and personal with Optane DC Persistent Memory in an article posted yesterday, removing the heat spreaders and taking a look at (and several photos of) the components within.

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Intel Optane Persistent Memory DDR4 module, front view (via ServeTheHome)

"We are going to take a 128GB Intel Optane Persistent Memory DDR4 module, and open it up. Until now, Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory has mostly been photographed with its big black heat spreader. We ended up with a handful of modules not from Intel, nor a system provider, but a handful to use."

Among their notes we have this interesting find, as SK.Hynix is the provider of the module's DRAM, rather than Micron:

"On the other side of the module from the Optane controller is a DDR4 DRAM module, this one from SK.Hynix. Model number H5AN4G8NAFR-TFC. We are not sure why Intel would not use a Micron module here since Micron has been the manufacturing partner for 3D XPoint thus far."

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Intel Optane Persistent Memory DDR4 module, rear view (via ServeTheHome)

The full article is available here from STH and includes an embed of this video covering their de-lidding and chip exploration process:

Source: ServeTheHome

AMD Shows Off Zen 2-Based EPYC "Rome" Server Processor

Subject: Processors | November 7, 2018 - 11:00 PM |
Tagged: Zen 2, rome, PCI-e 4, Infinity Fabric, EPYC, ddr4, amd, 7nm

In addition to AMD's reveal of 7nm GPUs used in its Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 graphics cards (aimed at machine learning and other HPC acceleration), the company teased a few morsels of information on its 7nm CPUs. Specifically, AMD teased attendees of its New Horizon event with information on its 7nm "Rome" EPYC processors based on the new Zen 2 architecture.

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Tom's Hardware spotted the upcoming Epyc processor at AMD's New Horizon event.

The codenamed "Rome" EPYC processors will utilize a MCM design like its EPYC and Threadripper predecessors, but increases the number of CPU dies from four to eight (with each chiplet containing eight cores with two CCXs) and adds a new 14nm I/O die that sits in the center of processor that consolidates memory and I/O channels to help even-out the latency among all the cores of the various dies. This new approach allows each chip to directly access up to eight channels of DDR4 memory (up to 4TB) and will no longer have to send requests to neighboring dies connected to memory which was the case with, for example, Threadripper 2. The I/O die is speculated by TechPowerUp to also be responsible for other I/O duties such as PCI-E 4.0 and the PCH communication duties previously integrated into each die.

"Rome" EPYC processors with up to 64 cores (128 threads) are expected to launch next year with AMD already sampling processors to its biggest enterprise clients. The new Zen 2-based processors should work with existing Naples and future Milan server platforms. EPYC will feature from four to up to eight 7nm Zen 2 dies connected via Infinity Fabric to a 14nm I/O die.

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AMD CEO Lisa Su holding up "Rome" EPYC CPU during press conference earlier this year.

The new 7nm Zen 2 CPU dies are much smaller than the dies of previous generation parts (even 12nm Zen+). AMD has not provided full details on the changes it has made with the new Zen 2 architecutre, but it has apparently heavily tweaked the front end operations (branch prediction, pre-fetching) and increased cache sizes as well as doubling the size of the FPUs to 256-bit. The architectural improvements alogn with the die shrink should allow AMD to show off some respectable IPC improvements and I am interested to see details and how Zen 2 will shake out.

Also read:

G.Skill Reveals Trident Z RGB DC Double Capacity UDIMMs for ASUS Z390 Motherboards

Subject: General Tech | October 9, 2018 - 09:46 PM |
Tagged: Trident Z RGB, samsung b-die, G.Skill, double capacity DIMM, ddr4, DC DIMM, 64GB

G.Skill has joined forces with ASUS to release a new series of Trident Z RGB DC DDR4 memory modules aimed at ASUS’ Z390 motherboards and take advantage of “double capacity DIMM” technology that  uses taller form factors to allow twice the memory ICs per stick.

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The new Trident Z RGB DC memory modules feature 16 Samsung B-die memory ICs for a total capacity of 32 GB when using 8Gb chips. Initially, G.Skill will offer the new double capacity modules in 64GB kits (32GB x 2) clocked at 3000 MHz and 3200 MHz. As part of the company’s Trident Z RGB family, the new DC series continue to support RGB LEDs which can be customized by software including Asus Aura Sync. The 3000 MHz kit comes with 14-14-14-34 timings. There are two 3200 MHz kits (both 64 GB) that come either with 14-14-14-34 or 14-15-15-35 timings. All three kits operate at 1.35V out of the box.

The double capacity DIMMs will work with select ASUS motherboard based around the Intel Z390 chipset including the ROG Z390 Maximus XI APEX, ROG Maximus XI Gene, and ROG STRIX Z390-I Gaming.

The Mini ITX Strix Z390-I Gaming board would benefit the most from the double capacity DIMMs at they will allow enthusiasts to pack more than the 32 GB limit of today’s JEDEC standard UDIMMs into the only two memory slots on the board. Meanwhile, the larger Z390 boards will be able to host even more memory enabling workstation workloads to be run (or a big ass home virtual lab environment heh).

G.Skill has not yet released pricing or availability information for these new memory kits. I am curious whether the double capacity DIMM standard will catch on and if it will be adopted by other motherboard manufacturers or if it will stay an ASUS exclusive feature. At least on paper, it appears the only tradeoff is having to accommodate taller modules when considering which CPU cooler to purchase.

Source: G.Skill

Ampere Starts Shipping ARM-Based 16 and 32-Core eMAG Processors for Data Center

Subject: General Tech | September 29, 2018 - 10:48 AM |
Tagged: Ampere, arm, armv8-a, datacenter, ddr4

Ampere recently announced the availability of its first ARM-based server processor dubbed eMAG. The new chips use 16 or 32 custom CPU cores built upon the X-Gene 3 (once pioneered by Applied Micro) compatible with the 64-bit ARMv8-A instruction set. Ampere, in partnership with Lenovo (and several smaller unspecified ODMs), has started shipping eMAG to its customers and partners. Current eMAG processors are based on TSMC 16nm FinFET+ and Ampere plans to move future eMAG processors to TSMC’s 7nm node while adding support for multi-socket servers as soon as next year.

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Ampere’s eMAG processors are designed for the datacenter with big data computing workloads in mind that benefit from large amounts of memory and cores including big data analytics, web serving, and in-memory databases. The new ARM server CPU entrant is designed to compete with the likes of Intel’s Xeon and AMD’s EPYC X86-64 processors as well as other ARM-based offerings from Cavium and Qualcomm. Early reports suggest that eMAG is no slouch in performance, but where it really excels is in price to performance, performance per core per dollar, and total cost of ownership metrics.

Today’s eMAG processors feature either 16 or 32 custom ARM cores clocked at 3.0 GHz base and up to 3.3 GHz turbo with 32KB I-cache, 32KB D-cache (L1) per core, 256KB L2 cache which is shared between two paired cores, and a global shared 32MB L3 cache. There are eight DDR4 memory controllers (up to 1TB DDR4-2667 using 16 DIMMs for up to 170.7 GB/s memory bandwidth) as well as 42 lanes of PCI-E 3.0 I/O. The CPU cores, cache, and controllers are connected using a switch that is part of a coherent fabric. Additional I/O support includes four SATA 3 and two USB 2.0 along with 10GbE. The eMAG processors have a 125W TDP.

Perhaps most interesting is the pricing which Ampere has set at a rather aggressive $550 for the 16-core chip and $850 for the 32-core processor. The Ampere chips are interesting especially following Qualcomm’s seeming loss of interest in this space as it dialed back its Centriq efforts earlier this year. With a new ARM entrant that reduces the datacenter barrier to entry for workloads that need lots of acceptable performance cores paired with lots of memory and AMD’s renewed datacenter push on all fronts, Intel is going to have its work cut out for it when it comes to maintaining its datacenter dominance. At the very least it may shake up server CPU pricing. Further, perhaps beyond its intended use, these ARM-based offerings may also introduce some new server platforms that are accessible to enthusiast virtual lab-ers and small HPC developers (small shops, universities, etc) that can use lower cost systems like these for testing and research into developing highly parallelized code that will eventually be run on higher end servers in the “hyperscale” data center.

I am curious to see if the eMAG will live up to its performance claims and expectations of competing with the big players in this space. According to ExtremeTech, Ampere claims the 32-core eMAG is able to match the Intel Xeon Gold 6130 (16 core / 32 thread, 2.1-3.7 GHz, 22MB L3, and 125W TDP) in SPEC CINT2006 benchmarks. The company further claimed earlier this year that eMAG would offer up to 90% performance per dollar versus Xeon Silver and 40% higher performance per dollar compared to Xeon Gold processors from Intel.

What are your thoughts on eMAG and ARM in the server space?

Related Reading:

Source: Ampere

Computex 2018: G.Skill Attains 13 Overclocking World Records Including DDR4 5543 MHz

Subject: General Tech | June 11, 2018 - 11:25 PM |
Tagged: Trident Z RGB, samsung b-die, overclocking, msi, LN2, liquid nitrogen, Intel, G.Skill, ddr4, computex 2018, computex

G.Skill held its annual extreme overclocking competitions (the OC World Cup Competition and OC World Record Stage) at Computex 2018 in Taipei where the overclockers managed to break 13 world records including the two highest DDR4 clockspeeds and the fastest Core i7-8700K clockspeed.

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Overclocking teams from around the world using Intel processors, G.Skill DDR4 memory, and motherboards from MSI, EVGA, and ASRock along with extreme cooling methods (de-lidding and loads of LN2) were used to set the world records in 3DMark Fire Strike, SuperPi, Maxxmem, Geekbench 4, GPUPi for CPU, WPrime, and PiFast benchmarks along with hardware records of DDR4 5543 MHz and an Intel Core i7-8700K at 7409.03 MHz.

On the memory front, G.Skill notes that Toppc is now the world record holder with the DDR4-5543 MHz overclock achieved using an Intel i7-8700K, MSI Z370I Gaming Pro Carbon AC, and G.Skill Trident Z RGB memory. Following Toppc’s overclock Kovan Yang managed to achieve the second highest DDR4 clockspeed record at DDR4-5541 MHz on the MSI X299 Gaming Pro Carbon AC motherboard and Intel Core i7-7740X processor which is an interesting feat on the HEDT platform.

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Other notable benchmark world records include a 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme Single score of 20,320 (i9-7980XE and EVGA X299 Dark platform), Geekbench4 Single Core score of 9842 points (i7-8700K on an ASRock Z170M OC Formula), WPRIME -32M score of 1.937 seconds, and a SuperPi 32M score of 4 minutes and 8.922 seconds.

Interestingly, G.Skill’s video coverage (embedded below) shows both manual full pot cooling as well as the automated Roboclocker LN2 cooler being used. The video jumps from scene to scene quickly but it does give you some glimpses at the process and the pots/heatsinks used with the RAM and processor to keep things cool even when cranking up the voltage and clocks!

Also read:

Source: G.Skill

Computex 2018: G.Skill Teases Trident Z RGB Royal Memory

Subject: Memory | June 6, 2018 - 08:06 PM |
Tagged: gskill, G.Skill, ddr4, Trident Z RGB, RGB LED, computex, computex 2018

G.Skill teased new DDR4 memory modules at Computex this year including the mysterious and stylish Trident Z RGB Royal memory. The new memory, of which G.Skill had a single stick on display, features a metallic heatspreader with a mirror finish as well as a crystalized RGB LED light diffuser that manages to make RGB look awesome.

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Unfortunately, other than admiring the aesthetics, I have not been able to find any other information on this new RGB Royal series of memory. Hopefully G.Skill will be more willing to spill the beans after the craziness of Computex is over and the memory gets closer to fruition. One thing that is almost certain is that these DIMMs are not going to be cheap!

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G.Skill and Noticias3D have very short video clips of the single stick that was on display at Computex if you are curious what the crystalized RGB lighting looks like in action.

Source: G.Skill