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Intel's 8 Cores meal; comes with a Coffee Refresh

Subject: General Tech | June 15, 2018 - 02:38 PM |
Tagged: Intel, rumour, coffee lake refresh

Kudos to Intel for choosing to name their Coffee Lake Refresh exactly that, instead of adding an 'S' to the end of the name.   The refresh is rumoured to include an 8-core mainstream model, which will somewhat narrow AMD's current lead.  The rumours The Inquirer heard also suggest a 22-core high end model is a possibility, certainly an interesting count if nothing else.  This would come at a cost however, a run of Coffee Lake Refresh suggests that Cannon Lake may need a little work before it can be fired off.

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"The schedule states that Intel will launch the 8-core chip as an extension of the existing Coffee Lake family of processors in a few months' time, but it will be named the Coffee Lake Refresh, not the Coffee Lake S as previously speculated."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

Computex 2018: Cooler Master Shows Off Prototype Thermoelectric (TEC) AIO Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 13, 2018 - 07:39 PM |
Tagged: thermoelectric, TEC, liquid cooling, cooler master, computex 2018, computex, AIO

In addition to cases and massive amounts of RGB Cooler Master had a prototype closed loop cooler on display at Computex that combines an all in one liquid cooling loop with a TEC element that cools the water to sub-ambient temperatures.

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TechPowerUp snapped photos from the show floor.

Thermoelectric coolers aren't anything new (and this isn't Cooler Master's first foray with TECs), but the hybrid approach is an interesting one. The AIO loop appears to work like a water chiller cooler would with the TEC not having direct contact with the processor but rather it is used to give the single 120mm liquid loop radiator a boost by pulling lots of heat out of the water before hitting the radiator. According to Computex attendees the loop order flows from the CPU block to the TEC element where water is passed across one side of the side and the other hot side is cooled by a large heatsink which uses four heatpipes and dual fin stacks along with two fans in a package about the size of a 240mm radiator. From there, the chilled water passes through a traditional water cooling radiator and then the cool water goes to the CPU block.

The thermoelectric cooler uses the Peltier effect where electricity (DC) is passed between an array of thermocouples that sit between two layers (usually ceramics) creating an effect where heat is drawn from one side to the other with the cool side able to be cooled below ambient temperatures while the hot side needs to be cooled by a heatsink to prevent it from overheating and reducing efficiency and/or damaging the materials.

According to PC World, Cooler Master has stated that their prototype TEC will be rated at 300W TDP which is quite a bit higher than the approximately 180W of a 240mm traditional AIO. Gordon Mah Ung was able to perform some cursory testing with a FLIR camera attached to his smartphone where he saw the cooler demonstrate its ability to cool the water used in the loop 10 to 15-degrees below ambient where it was around 80°F (~26.7°C) in the packed Computex show floor and 64 to 70°F for the water as measured by the FLIR when pointing at the radiator and tubing. Further, Cooler Master had a temperature probe at the CPU block where it measured 20°C (likely no heat load as no processor was hooked up heh). This boosted cooling performance does come with a tradeoff, however. The TEC's hot side will need to be cooled (noise) and the TEC itself will draw as much as 150W of power (it will use standard connectors that a PC PSU can drive) in order to work its cooling magic (so higher electricity usage/cost).

My first thought was that the hybrid cooler could prove useful in a SFF system by offering cooling potential that would just otherwise not be possible in the form factor with the thinking that the cooler would not need to cool to crazy low temperatures, but just enough to match the performance of a much larger water cooling loop. Gordon Mah Ung from PC World also posits that the cooler would be useful in situations where ambient temperatures are very high (say, summer months in the south with no or underpowered AC) as the TEC would be able to keep processor temperatures in check (allowing enthusiasts to maintain their overclock or at least keep stock clocks and Turbo Boost without thermal throttling) where air cooling or water cooling cannot as the best they can do is cool to ambient.

Apparently, the hybrid cooler will also be able to push things if you do want to go for higher overclocks for benchmarking runs or improved gaming performance.

One concern with thermoelectric and other sub-ambient cooling methods is condensation which can build up on the outside of cool parts like the tubing and blocks and can potentially cause instability or damage to PC components. Traditionally, the tubing and area around the CPU socket would need to be insulated to protect from this. Cooler Master's design, I don't think, is immune to this but by moving the TEC away from the processor and using it to cool the water (so no direct contact), it is allegedly much less of an issue and if the TEC is just used to provide a bit of a boost to the water loop rather than going for as low temperatures as possible the risk should be minimal.

There is no word on specific pricing or release dates, but several sites are reporting that it will be available later this year with "competitive pricing". I would guess this cooler is going to be at the high end of water cooling AIOs and expandable kits at minimum which is to say probably around $300+. (Looking on Amazon, EKWB kit with 360mm radiator is $370, you can find kits with 240mm radiators for between two-to-three hundred dollars, and a used custom loop starts around there if you find a forum deal.)

What do you think about this cooler? I am interested in seeing the reviews on this and whether it is able to combine the best of both water and TEC cooling worlds.

Also read: 

Source: PC World

PCPer Live! AMD joins us to talk about FreeSync for HDR and TVs!

Subject: Displays | June 18, 2018 - 12:34 PM |
Tagged: pcper live, live, giveaway, contest

Interested in new gaming displays? Interested in new gaming displays that can also do HDR? Then you are going to want to swing by the PC Perspective Live! channel on Tuesday, June 19th at 4pm ET / 1pm PT to hear from AMD about its plans for the future of FreeSync. Though we cannot spill the beans yet, I'm told that AMD will be discussing some changes to FreeSync at our event, with maybe an additional surprise or two along the way.

This is your chance to ask questions about FreeSync, HDR gaming, FreeSync on TVs, and much more!

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And what's a live stream without prizes? AMD agrees and wants offer up some awesome hardware for those of you that tune in to watch our live stream! 

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  • 1 x Pixio PX277 Monitor (2560x1440, 144 Hz)

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AMD FreeSync Live Stream and Giveaway

1pm PT / 4pm ET - June 19th

PC Perspective Live! Page

Need a reminder? Join our live mailing list!

The event will take place Tuesday, June 19th at 1pm PT / 4pm ET at https://www.pcper.com/live. There you’ll be able to catch the live video stream as well as use our chat room to interact with the audience. To win the prizes you will have to be watching the live stream, with exact details of the methodology for handing out the goods coming at the time of the event.

I will be joined by Antal Tungler, Sr Manager of Technology Marketing, to answer your questions about FreeSync technology, implementation, products, direction, etc.!

If you have questions, please leave them in the comments below and we'll look through them just before the start of the live stream. Of course you'll be able to tweet us questions @pcper and we'll be keeping an eye on the IRC chat as well for more inquiries. What do you want to know and hear from AMD?

So join us! Set your calendar for Tuesday at 1pm PT / 4pm ET and be here at PC Perspective to catch it. If you are a forgetful type of person, sign up for the PC Perspective Live mailing list that we use exclusively to notify users of upcoming live streaming events including these types of specials and our regular live podcast. I promise, no spam will be had!

Source: PCPer Live!
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Toshiba

Toshiba RC100 240GB/480GB SSD Review

Introduction:

Budget SSDs are a tough trick to pull off. You have components, a PCB, and ultimately assembly - all things which costs money. Savings can be had when major components (flash) are sourced from within the same company, but there are several companies already playing that game. Another way to go is to reduce PCB size, but then you can only fit so much media on the same board as the controller and other necessary parts. Samsung attempted something like this with its PM971, but that part was never retail, meaning the cost savings were only passed to the OEMs implementing that part into their systems. It would be nice if a manufacturer would put a part like this into the hands of regular customers looking to upgrade their system on a budget, and Toshiba is aiming to do just that with their new RC100 line:

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Not only did Toshiba stack the flash and controller within the same package, they also put that package on an M.2 2242 PCB. No need for additional length here really, and they could have possibly gotten away with M.2 2230, but that might have required some components on the back side of the PCB. Single-sided PCBs are cheaper to produce vs. a PCB that is 12mm longer, so the design decision makes sense here.

Specifications:

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Bear in mind these are budget parts and small ones at that. The specs are decent, but these are not meant to be fire-breathing SSDs. The PCIe 3.0 x2 interface will be limiting things a bit, and these are geared more towards power efficiency with a typical active power draw of only 3.2 Watts. While we were not sampled the 120GB part, it does appear to maintain decent specified performance despite the lower capacity, which is a testament to the performance of Toshiba's 64-layer 3D BiCS TLC flash.

Packaging:

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Not much to talk about here. Simple, no frills, SSD packaging. Just enough to ensure the product arrives undamaged. Mission accomplished.

Read on for our full review of the Toshiba RC100 240GB and 480GB SSDs!

Subject: Motherboards
Manufacturer: GIGABYTE

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of GIGABYTE

The X299 Designare EX motherboard is GIGiABYTE's latest flagship product offering support for Intel's HEDT chipset and processor line. With it's late entry into the fray, GIGABYTE was able to tweak its layout and feature set to make the Designare board a more appealing product over previously introduced boards. Built around the Intel X299 chlipset, the board supports the Intel LGA2066 processor line, including the Skylake-X and Kaby Lake-X processors, with support for Quad-Channel DDR4 memory running at a 2667MHz speed. The X299 Designare EX can be found in retail with an MRSP of around $500.00.

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Courtesy of GIGABYTE

GIGABYTE integrated the following features into the X299 Designare EX motherboard: eight SATA III 6Gbps ports; three M.2 PCIe Gen3 x4 32Gbps capable ports with Intel Optane support built-in; dual Intel Gigabit RJ-45 ports - Intel I219-V Gigabit and Intel I211 controllers; an Intel 8265 802.11ac WiFi controller; five PCI-Express x16 slots; Realtek® ALC1220 8-Channel audio subsystem; and USB 2.0, 3.0, and 3.1 Type-A and Type-C port support. GIGABYTE also integrated there steel-based armor slots for the board's PCIe and memory slots, giving them added strength and durability.

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Courtesy of GIGABYTE

For added strength, rigidity, and underside protection, GIGABYTE integrated a metal armor under plate onto the board's underside much like that seen on ASUS' TUF board line. The under plate also acts as a secondary heat dissipation path. Further, GIGABYTE integrated a metal rear I/O Shield over the rear panel components, adding out of the box protection for those normal exposed ports.

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Courtesy of GIGABYTE

To power the board, GIGABYTE integrated integrated a 13-phase digital power delivery system into the X299 Designare EX's design. The digital power system was designed with IR digital power controllers and PowIRstage ICs, Server Level Chokes, and Durable Black capacitors.

Continue reading our preview of the GIGABYTE X299 Designare EX motherboard!

Cortana's feeling vulnerable; that's why she's always eavesdropping on you

Subject: General Tech | June 13, 2018 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged: security, windows 10, cortana, microsoft, spectre

If your Win10 machine did not go beep in the night, you might want to get on that reboot as there are numerous security patches waiting to install.  One of them is a long standing flaw which effects those who haven't disembowelled the Cortana search assistant on their computer.  For those that have managed to subdue Cortana, rest assured she is not listening to you at all times; those who haven't should be aware that she is always listening, even in her sleep.  As creepy as that already is, it has also been a way to take advantage of long standing security flaw in the assistant.   This, as well as a patch for a Spectre variant and a variety of other patches is waiting your installation. 

You can check out information on Cortana's bad habits over at The Inquirer.

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"Lane Thames, a senior security researcher at Tripwire, spoke out about the long-standing flaw with Cortana, that meant the AI helper was always listening for commands, even when a PC is locked."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

Steam Is Going Windows 7 and Up

Subject: General Tech | June 13, 2018 - 08:08 PM |
Tagged: windows xp, windows vista, valve, steam, pc gaming

Valve has just announced that the Steam Client has deprecated Windows XP and Windows Vista. On January 1st, the Steam Client will stop playing video games unless you upgrade to at least Windows 7. They have also announced that new features, like the updated Steam Chat, currently in Beta, will not be brought to those platforms, because why would they bother when they’re going to obsolete in about six-and-a-half months? Don’t poke it if it works, and fix what doesn’t.

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The pun writes itself...

Linux and macOS are still fine of course.

In terms of market share numbers, 32-bit Windows XP is sitting at around 0.34%; Windows Vista is unlisted. I doubt this will affect many of our viewers unless they have a “retro PC hobby”. Still, to some extent, it sucks that DRM shuts down games that could otherwise run on the target environment. It’s not like they can just make the games DRM-free for the affected OSes, though, but it’s still something to think about.

And, yes, both OSes (XP SP3 and Vista SP2) are already deprecated by Microsoft.

Feel that Hyper Pulsefire Surge in the palm of your hand

Subject: General Tech | June 15, 2018 - 03:01 PM |
Tagged: Pulsefire Surge, PMW3389, NGenuity, kingston, input, hyperx

There are two things that stand out about this new mouse from Kingston HyperX, the moniker they hung on it and the RGB programmability.  The Pulsefire Surge may sound like a special attack you need to charge up but The Tech Report found it to be fairly generic, from the shape of the body to the Pixart PMW3389 IR LED sensor.  However, for those who love to put on a lightshow, the HyperX NGenuity software offers a unique trick.  You can program the 33 RGB LED clusters individually, offering a chance for a truly enlightened mouse, if you are willing to pay the $70 MSRP.

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"HyperX's Pulsefire Surge starts with a proven design and rings it with an array of configurable RGB LEDs to let gamers enjoy both form and function. We put the Pulsefire Surge to the mat to see whether it games as well as it glows."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Podcast #503 - Intel i7-8086K, Corsair Void Pro headset, and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 14, 2018 - 03:24 PM |
Tagged: video, zotac, VOID PRO, toshiba, Optane, noctua, logitech, Intel, i7-8086k, G512, corsair, coolermaster, amd, podcast

PC Perspective Podcast #503 - 06/14/18

Join us this week for discussion on Intel i7-8086K, Corsair Void Pro headset, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:18:14

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:10:55 Ryan: Transcend USB 3.0 Card Reader for $8!
      1. Can get it in pink for $.01 less!
    2. 1:12:10 Jeremy: Go for the Gold with Corsair’s Crystal Series 460X
    3. 1:13:15 Josh: Whoa...
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

Intel confirms first graphics chips will land in 2020

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 12, 2018 - 02:21 PM |
Tagged: Intel, graphics, gpu, raja koduri

This article first appeared on MarketWatch.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich disclosed during an analyst event last week that it will have its first discrete graphics chips available in 2020. This will mark the beginning of the chip giant’s journey towards a portfolio of high-performance graphics products for various markets including gaming, data center, and AI.

Some previous rumors posited that a launch at CES 2019 this coming January might be where Intel makes its graphics reveal, but that timeline was never adopted by Intel. It would have been drastically overaggressive and in no way reasonable with the development process of a new silicon design.

Back in November 2017 Intel brought on board Raja Koduri to lead the graphics and compute initiatives inside the company. Koduri was previously in charge of the graphics division at AMD, helping to develop and grow the Radeon brand, and his departure to Intel was thought to have significant impact on the industry.

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A typical graphics architecture and chip development cycle is three years for complex design, so even hitting the 2020 window with engineering talent is aggressive.

Intel did not go into detail about what performance level or target market this first discrete GPU solution might address, but Intel EVP of the Data Center Group Navin Shenoy confirmed that the company’s strategy will include solutions for data center segments (think AI, machine learning) along with client (think gaming, professional development).

This is a part of the wider scale AI and machine learning strategy for Intel, that includes these discrete graphics chip products in addition to other options like the Xeon processor family, FPGAs from its acquisition of Altera, and custom AI chips like the Nervana-based NNP.

While the leader in the space, NVIDIA, maintains its position with graphics chips, it is modifying and augmenting these processors with additional features and systems to accelerate AI even more. It will be interesting to see how Intel plans to catch up in design and deployment.

Though few doubt the capability of Intel for chip design, building a new GPU architecture from the ground up is not a small task. Intel needs to provide a performance and efficiency level that is in the same ballpark as NVIDIA and AMD; within 20% or so. Doing that on the first attempt, while also building and fostering the necessary software ecosystem and tools around the new hardware is a tough ask of any company, Silicon Valley juggernaut or no. Until we see the first options available in 2020 to gauge, NVIDIA and AMD have the leadership positions.

Both AMD and NVIDIA will be watching Intel with great interest as GPU development accelerates. AMD’s Forest Norrod, SVP of its data center group, recently stated in an interview that he didn’t expect Koduri at Intel to “have any impact at Intel for at least another three years.” If Intel can deliver on its 2020 target for the first in a series of graphics releases, it might put pressure on these two existing graphics giants sooner than most expected.

Source: MarketWatch

Trailer trashin'; missed an E3 trailer you wanted to see?

Subject: General Tech | June 13, 2018 - 02:34 PM |
Tagged: gaming, E3

Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN have complied all the trailers they could get their mitts on and posted them to a single, very long page.  If you missed any of the trailers or would like another peek then the chances are good you can find what you seek in that link.  They delve into details in the links added into their brief descriptions and you can also follow the links below to get even more information, such as the secret message from CD Projekt Red.

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"Not to worry though, here are all the trailers and news for you in one place. There’s a surprising amount of variety in the announced titles: from an old favourite making a return, much celebrated developers showing off their new series, to even a completely free game launching very soon. The games below aren’t in any particular order but you’re in for a long ride."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Gigabyte bakes Optane right into their latest Z370 motherboards

Subject: Motherboards | June 13, 2018 - 04:27 PM |
Tagged: Z370, gigabyte, aorus, GAMING 7-OP, ULTRA GAMING WIFI-OP, ULTRA GAMING 2.0-OP, HD3-OP

A limited number of Gigabyte's new Z370 motherboards will come with 32GB of Optane built  in the board, or at least that is how the PR describes it.

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The boards will ship with Gigabyte's M.2 Thermal Guard installed which leads one to surmise that these are not permanently connected to the motherboard similar to how a BGA processor is installed but are instead already installed in an M.2 slot.  Regardless of how they attached it, you get the benefits of Optane memory right from the beginning, which is not a bad thing in any way.

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This is not their first bundle, you can still grab an Ultra Gaming + 32GB Optane on Amazon, which gives us an idea of the price.  Lets hope we don't see branding which describes the board as coming with 32GB of RAM already installed as this could lead to a lot of disappointment for someone who didn't pick up any DDR4. 

You can see the effect of using Optane memory on your computer in Ken's review.

 

 

Source: Gigabyte

BlackBerry Launches Security-Focused KEY2 Smartphone with Physical Keyboard

Subject: General Tech | June 14, 2018 - 03:05 AM |
Tagged: Oreo, encryption, dtek, blackberry, android 8.1, Android

BlackBerry’s upcoming KEY2 smartphone is a refreshed successor to last year’s KEYone that addresses most of the issues of its predecessor. At 151.4 x 71.8 x 8.5mm and 168 grams the KEY2 is slightly taller, but skinnier, thinner, and lighter than the KEYone with less rounded edges and no camera bump. The KEY2 comes in silver or black and features an aluminum alloy frame, soft touch non-slip back, and a 4.5” display and 35-key backlit physical keyboard around front. The smartphone runs the Android 8.1 Oreo operating system along with BlackBerry security features like a hardened kernel, secure boot, full disk encryption, DTEK security suite, Locker, and the privacy focused Firefox Focus browser.

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The 4.5” IPS display remains the same as the KEYone featuring a 3:2 aspect ratio and 1620 x 1080 resolution, but the BlackBerry KEY2 does feature an updated camera system and a tweaked keyboard. The dual rear 12MP cameras work with a dual tone LED flash and laser and phase detection auto focus (one camera supports a 2X zoom and supports portrait mode) to offer up high-resolution HDR images and 4K30 or 1080p60 videos. Around front, BlackBerry includes an 8MP camera for video conferencing or “selfies”. The keyboard has been updated with 20% taller keys and a matte finish while the right shift key has been swapped out for what BlacKBerry calls the Speed Key which allows users to hold in combination with any other key to open applications of their choice. The keyboard can be used as a trackpad with gesture support and hosts a fingerprint sensor in the space bar. According to YouTube vloggers at a BlackBerry event the keyboard feels more like the BlackBerry Bold keyboards of old which is a good thing. The keys are reportedly more clicky and less mushy as well.

The KEY2 features a headphone jack up top, power, volume, and convenience keys along the right edge, and a single speaker and USB-C port on the bottom edge.

Internally, BlackBerry has slightly updated the specifications to a Qualcomm Snapdragon 660, 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of flash storage, and a 3500 mAh batter. While the Snapdragon 660 is still a solidly midrange part, it is at least a good bit faster than the SD620 used in the KEYone thanks to the move to Kryo 260 CPU cores. Specifically, the Snapdragon 660 has four Kryo 260 CPU cores at 2.2 GHz and four cores at 1.8 GHz along with an Adreno 512 GPU, Hexagon 680 DSP, and X12 LTE modem. Wireless I/O includes 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5.0, LTE, NFC, GPS, and FM radios. BlackBerry claims that the KEY2’s battery is good for up to two days of mixed usage and it supports USB Power Delivery 2.0 v1.2 and 9V2A 18W along with Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 for charging.

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This secure Android experience with physical key goodness comes at a cost, however. TCL’s BlackBerry KEY2 will be available later this month starting at $649 for the 64GB version (there is no word on the 128GB version’s price).

From my understanding the KEYone was a successful product for the company, and the improved KEY2 is sure to find a market among physical keyboard enthusiasts and security conscious business users even at the premium price.

Source: Blackberry

PCPer Mailbag #48 - 6/15/2018

Subject: Editorial | June 15, 2018 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: video, Ryan Shrout, pcper mailbag

It's time for the PCPer Mailbag, our weekly show where Ryan and the team answer your questions about the tech industry, the latest and greatest GPUs, the process of running a tech review website, and more!

On today's show:

00:35 - NVIDIA needs to hit 7nm for 2019 GPUs?
04:09 - Where are the microATX X470 boards?
05:56 - Threadripper APU?
07:33 - Buying a higher-end chipset just to overclock RAM?
08:58 - UHD Blu-ray playback vs. 4K gaming performance requirements?
10:25 - Itanium processors still around?
14:02 - Optane waterblock?
15:13 - Intel stole all the good 8700Ks?
16:47 - Why do cases and motherboards still have USB 2.0?

Want to have your question answered on a future Mailbag? Leave a comment on this post or in the YouTube comments for the latest video. Check out new Mailbag videos each Friday!

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel to make sure you never miss our weekly reviews and podcasts, and please consider supporting PC Perspective via Patreon to help us keep videos like our weekly mailbag coming!

Source: YouTube

Logitech's new G512 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard and GX Blue key switch

Subject: General Tech | June 12, 2018 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: input, logitech g, GX Blue, G513, G512, mechanical keyboard

Logitech G revealed a new type of keyswitch that will be available on the G513 and new G512 mechanical keyboards as well as early access to new control software called G Hub. 

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You are likely already familiar with the G513, which Christopher recently reviewed.  That model used Romer-G linear switches with a model using tactile switches also available, adding a bump at the end of a keypress.  You will now be able to chose a model with the new GX Blue key switch, which offers an audible and tactile click at the end of your keypress, filling out the majority of the preferred mechanical switch types. 

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The new G512 keyboard is physically similar to the G513 but in a slimmed down package.  The wrist rest has been removed as well as the kit to pull off your keycaps to replace them with your own favourites.  It does retain all the LIGHTSYNC RGBs, along with the ability to program your lightshows using the Logitech Gaming Software you can grab from Logitech; unless you are feeling adventurous. 

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Depending on your location, you can try out the pre-release version of Logitech's new G Hub software which will replace LGS in the near future. The new software will offer all the functionality of LGS but with an improved interface to let you be even more creative with your shiny, shiny lights. 

 

Source: Logitech
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Corsair

Wire Free with RGB

Corsair has been on a roll lately. We’ve looked at a number of their peripherals here at PC Perspective and have consistently found them to be well-built, performance accessories for your gaming rig. Today we’re leaving the keyboards and mice behind to take a look at a different, more divisive product category: the gaming headset. Corsair’s Void Pro RGB Wireless looks great on the surface but does it have the sound and comfort to match? Let’s take a closer look and find out.

Specifications and Design

  • MSRP: $99.99 (Amazon.com)
  • Wireless: Yes
  • Wireless Range: Up to 40 feet (12m)
  • Surround Sound: Virtual 7.1 Dolby Headphone
  • Headphone Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20 kHz
  • Headphone Impedance: 32 Ohms @ 1 kHz
  • Headphone Drivers Drivers: 50mm
  • Headphone Connector: USB Dongle
  • Battery Life: Up to 16 hours
  • Microphone Type: Unidirectional noise cancelling
  • Microphone Impedance: 2.0k Ohms
  • Microphone Frequency Response: 100Hz to 10kHz
  • Microphone Sensitivity: -38dB (+/-3dB)
  • Lighting: RGB
  • Audio CUE Software: YES
  • Warranty: Two years

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As always, we begin with packaging. Corsair always does a good job here. We find the usual black and yellow trim with the shard background on the face, as well as our key feature callouts. You can’t see it well on the box since they went with a black and white aesthetic but both the “sails” logo and the trim on the microphone’s boom arm are illuminated, though only the former is RGB. Inside the box, we find the headset well packaged without any annoying tie-downs.

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Continue reading our review of the Corsair Void Pro RGB Wireless headset!

Computex 2018: G.Skill Attains 13 Overclocking World Records Including DDR4 5543 MHz

Subject: General Tech | June 11, 2018 - 11:25 PM |
Tagged: Trident Z RGB, samsung b-die, overclocking, msi, LN2, liquid nitrogen, Intel, G.Skill, ddr4, computex 2018, computex

G.Skill held its annual extreme overclocking competitions (the OC World Cup Competition and OC World Record Stage) at Computex 2018 in Taipei where the overclockers managed to break 13 world records including the two highest DDR4 clockspeeds and the fastest Core i7-8700K clockspeed.

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Overclocking teams from around the world using Intel processors, G.Skill DDR4 memory, and motherboards from MSI, EVGA, and ASRock along with extreme cooling methods (de-lidding and loads of LN2) were used to set the world records in 3DMark Fire Strike, SuperPi, Maxxmem, Geekbench 4, GPUPi for CPU, WPrime, and PiFast benchmarks along with hardware records of DDR4 5543 MHz and an Intel Core i7-8700K at 7409.03 MHz.

On the memory front, G.Skill notes that Toppc is now the world record holder with the DDR4-5543 MHz overclock achieved using an Intel i7-8700K, MSI Z370I Gaming Pro Carbon AC, and G.Skill Trident Z RGB memory. Following Toppc’s overclock Kovan Yang managed to achieve the second highest DDR4 clockspeed record at DDR4-5541 MHz on the MSI X299 Gaming Pro Carbon AC motherboard and Intel Core i7-7740X processor which is an interesting feat on the HEDT platform.

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Other notable benchmark world records include a 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme Single score of 20,320 (i9-7980XE and EVGA X299 Dark platform), Geekbench4 Single Core score of 9842 points (i7-8700K on an ASRock Z170M OC Formula), WPRIME -32M score of 1.937 seconds, and a SuperPi 32M score of 4 minutes and 8.922 seconds.

Interestingly, G.Skill’s video coverage (embedded below) shows both manual full pot cooling as well as the automated Roboclocker LN2 cooler being used. The video jumps from scene to scene quickly but it does give you some glimpses at the process and the pots/heatsinks used with the RAM and processor to keep things cool even when cranking up the voltage and clocks!

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Source: G.Skill

Has your Amazon Fire TV been running a little hot lately?

Subject: General Tech | June 12, 2018 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: amazon fire tv, amazon, security, cryptocurrency, Android, ADB.Miner

New cryptomining malware has been popping up on Android devices recently, especially Fire TV's with debugging mode or installation of unsigned apps enabled. ADB.Miner runs a program called Test under com.google.time.time and will happily suck up as much of your devices processing power as it can, causing slow performance and occasionally interrupting video playback with a screen which reads Test.  If you have seen this you should probably disable debug, set the device to block unsigned apps and do a factory reset. 

The Inquirer also describes an Amazon store app called Total Commander which should remove it, but the factory reset will offer a better guarantee of removal.

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"AFTVnews has the scoop and reports that the threat, a malware worm variant dubbed 'ADB.Miner', is installing itself on Amazon gadgets as an app called 'Test' under the package name 'com.google.time.time.' "

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Source: The Inquirer

Corsairs that live in Crystal houses shouldn't throw rocks

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 12, 2018 - 06:19 PM |
Tagged: Crystal 280X, corsair, MicroATX, CUE

Recently announced at CES, the Corsair Crystal 280X RGB is up for review over at The Tech Report.  This microATX is wider than your average breadbox, 398x276x351mm (15.7x10.9x13.8") which gives you room for a 240mm rad and numerous 120/140mm fans on almost any side you desire, including the bottom.  Corsair CUE software will ensure all your RGBs blink in sync and with three tempered glass sides you will be able to see all of them.  Head on over for a better look at Corsair's newest case.

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"Corsair's Crystal Series 280X RGB is an unabashedly high-end microATX enclosure—a unicorn, in other words. We built up a high-end system worth of this enclosure and put the 280X RGB to the test to see if its performance can keep up with its striking looks."

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CASES & COOLING