Flash player not detected. Click here to install flash.
« 1 2 3 4 5 »

AMD Supports CrossFire On B350 and X370 Chipsets, However SLI Limited to X370

Subject: Motherboards | February 26, 2017 - 06:29 AM |
Tagged: x370, sli, ryzen, PCI-E 3.0, gaming, crossfire, b350, amd

Computerbase.de recently published an update (translated) to an article outlining the differences between AMD’s AM4 motherboard chipsets. As it stands, the X370 and B350 chipsets are set to be the most popular chipsets for desktop PCs (with X300 catering to the small form factor crowd) especially among enthusiasts. One key differentiator between the two chipsets was initially support for multi-GPU configurations with X370. Now that motherboards have been revealed and are up for pre-order now, it turns out that the multi-GPU lines have been blurred a bit. As it stands, both B350 and X370 will support AMD’s CrossFire multi-GPU technology and the X370 alone will also have support for NVIDIA’s SLI technology.

The AM4 motherboards equipped with the B350 and X370 chipsets that feature two PCI-E x16 expansion slots will run as x8 in each slot in a dual GPU setup. (In a single GPU setup, the top slot can run at full x16 speeds.) Which is to say that the slots behave the same across both chipsets. Where the chipsets differ is in support for specific GPU technologies where NVIDIA’s SLI is locked to X370. TechPowerUp speculates that the decision to lock SLI to its top-end chipset is due, at least in part, to licensing costs. This is not a bad thing as B350 was originally not going to support any dual x16 slot multi-GPU configurations, but now motherboard manufacturers are being allowed to enable it by including a second slot and AMD will reportedly permit CrossFire usage (which costs AMD nothing in licensing). Meanwhile the most expensive X370 chipset will support SLI for those serious gamers that demand and can afford it. Had B350 supported SLI and carried the SLI branding, they likely would have been ever so slightly more expensive than they are now. Of course, DirectX 12's multi-adapter will work on either chipset so long as the game supports it.

  X370 B350 A320 X300 / B300 / A300 Ryzen CPU Bristol Ridge APU
PCI-E 3.0 0 0 0 4 20 (18 w/ 2 SATA) 10
PCI-E 2.0 8 6 4 0 0 0
USB 3.1 Gen 2 2 2 1 1 0 0
USB 3.1 Gen 1 6 2 2 2 4 4
USB 2.0 6 6 6 6 0 0
SATA 6 Gbps 4 2 2 2 2 2
SATA RAID 0/1/10 0/1/10 0/1/10 0/1    
Overclocking Capable? Yes Yes No Yes (X300 only)    
SLI Yes No No No    
CrossFire Yes Yes No No    

Multi-GPU is not the only differentiator though. Moving up from B350 to X370 will get you 6 USB 3.1 Gen 1 (USB 3.0) ports versus 2 on B350/A30/X300, two more PCI-E 2.0 lanes (8 versus 6), and two more SATA ports (6 total usable; 4 versus 2 coming from the chipset).

Note that X370, B350, and X300 all support CPU overclocking. Hopefully this helps you when trying to decide which AM4 motherboard to pair with your Ryzen CPU once the independent benchmarks are out. In short, if you must have SLI you are stuck ponying up for X370, but if you plan to only ever run a single GPU or tend to stick with AMD GPUs and CrossFire, B350 gets you most of the way to a X370 for a lot less money! You do not even have to give up any USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports though you limit your SATA drive options (it’s all about M.2 these days anyway heh).

For those curious, looking around on Newegg I notice that most of the B350 motherboards have that second PCI-E 3.0 x16 slot and CrossFire support listed in their specifications and seem to average around $99.  Meanwhile X370 starts at $140 and rockets up from there (up to $299!) depending on how much bling you are looking for!

Are you going for a motherboard with the B350 or X370 chipset? Will you be rocking multiple graphics cards?

Also read:

Valve Software Releases Steam Audio SDK on GitHub

Subject: General Tech | February 26, 2017 - 05:13 AM |
Tagged: valve, pc gaming

When VR started to take off, developers begun to realize that audio is worth some attention. Historically, it’s been difficult to market, but that’s par for the course when it comes to VR technology, so I guess that’s no excuse to pass it up anymore. Now Valve, the owners of the leading VR platform on the PC have just released an API for audio processing: Steam Audio SDK.

valve-2017-steamaudio.png

Image Credit: Valve Software

First, I should mention that the SDK is not quite open. The GitHub page (and the source code ZIP in its releases tab) just contain the license (which is an EULA) and the readme. That said, Valve is under no obligation to provide these sorts of technology to the open (even though it would be nice) and they are maintaining builds for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. It is currently available as a C API and a plug-in for Unity. Unreal Engine 4, FMOD, and WWISE plug-ins are “coming soon”.

As for the technology itself, it has quite a few interesting features. As you might expect, it supports HRTF out of the box, which modifies a sound call to appear like it’s coming from a defined direction. The algorithm is based on experimental data, rather than some actual, physical process.

More interesting is their sound propagation and occlusion calculations. They are claiming that this can be raycast, and static scenes can bake some of the work ahead-of-time, which will reduce runtime overhead. Unlike VRWorks Audio or TrueAudio Next, it looks like they’re doing it on the CPU, though. I’m guessing this means that it will mostly raycast to fade between versions of the audio, rather than summing up contributions from thousands of individual rays at runtime (or an equivalent algorithm, like voxel leakage).

Still, this is available now as a C API and a Unity Plug-in, because Valve really likes Unity lately.

Source: Valve

Gigabyte is Ryzen up to the challenge of their rivals

Subject: Motherboards | February 24, 2017 - 10:30 PM |
Tagged: aorus, gigabyte, ryzen, b350, x370

Gigabyte have lead with five motherboards, two X370s under Aorus and three B350s with Gigabyte branding.  They all share some traits in common such as RGB Fusion with 16.8 million colours to choose from and an application to allow you to customize the light show to your own specifications.  It supports control from your phone if you are so addicted to the glow you need to play with your system from across the room. 

lightshow.PNG

Smartfan 5 indicates the presence of five headers for fans or pumps that will work with PWM and standard voltage fans, which can draw up to 12V at 2A.  The boards also have six temperature sensors to give you feedback on the effectiveness of your cooling and modify it with the included application.  Most models will offer Thunderbolt 3, Intel GbE NICs and an ASMedia 2142 USB 3.1 controllers which they claim can provide up to 16Gb/s.  All will have high end audio solutions, often featuring a headphone pre-amp and high quality capacitors.  There are a lot more features specific to each board, so make sure to click through to check out your favourites.

gigabyte.PNG

The Aorus boards, the GA-AX370-Gaming K7 and GA-AX370-GAMING 5 are very similar but if you plan on playing with your BCLK it is the K7 which includes Gigabyte's Turbo B-Clock.  The Gigabyte lineup includes the GA-AB350M, GA-AB350-Gaming and GA-AB350-GAMING 3.  The GA-AB350M is the only mATX Ryzen board of these five for those looking to build a smaller system.  For audiophiles the full size the GAMING 3 includes an ALC1220 codec as opposed to the ALC 887 used on the other two models. 

You can expect to see reviews of these boards which offer far more details on perfomance and features after they are released on March 2nd.  Full PR under the break.

Source: Gigabyte

AZiO's Armato mechnical keyboard has a big knob

Subject: General Tech | February 24, 2017 - 08:58 PM |
Tagged: cherry mx brown, input, mechanical keyboard, armato, AZiO

The Azio Armato is a big aluminium keyboard, with five macro keys located on the lower left, on the upper right are media control buttons beside the large volume knob.  The keyboard does come with a wrist rest, which attaches via a magnet so you can choose to remove it at will.  The keyboard does not require software, lighting is controlled via keystrokes and macros are recorded by pushing that large REC button and one of the macro keys, then up to up to 31 keys in sequence and the REC button again to save the macro.  You can see more of the Armato over at Benchmark Reviews.

azio_armato_keyboard_front.jpg

"In any case Benchmark Reviews has in hand their Armato Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, model MGK-ARMATO-01. As a single-color backlit mechanical keyboard with Cherry MX switches, it might seem as if there’s little to distinguish it from the many other similar products available. But first appearances can be deceiving, as we’ll find out in this review."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Farm out your hard drive for profit?

Subject: General Tech | February 24, 2017 - 08:04 PM |
Tagged: storj, farming, bitcoin

Startup company Storj has a new twist on an old service, they are offering secure, distributed storage but the storage is located on hard drives which consumers are renting to them.  You can set up an account and get 1.5 cents per gigabyte you give to them.  You certainly are not going to get rich running out and buying some SSDs to use but if you have a few old HDDs kicking around perhaps you would like to make a few bitcoins on the side.  They current have 8200 farmers and more than 15000 users so there is certainly some interest.  On the other hand residential internet stability and the reliability of consumer hard drives could lead to unexpected interruptions to your access.  Drop by The Register for links to sign up for the service or sell some space if you are interested.

storj_hdd_rental.jpg

"The network consists of the internet and a shared community of “farmers”, users who rent out their spare desktop hard drive space and bandwidth. Payment, at $0.015/GB, is via a cryptocurrency: namely, Bitcoin."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

AMD Launching Ryzen 5 Six Core Processors Soon (Q2 2017)

Subject: Processors | February 24, 2017 - 07:17 AM |
Tagged: Zen, six core, ryzen 5, ryzen, hexacore, gaming, amd

While AMD's Ryzen lineup and pricing has leaked out, only the top three Ryzen 7 processors are available for pre-order (with availability on March 2nd). Starting at $329 for the eight core sixteen thread Ryzen 7 1700, these processors are aimed squarely at enthusiasts craving top-end performance. It seems that enthusiasts looking for cheaper and better price/performance options for budget gaming and work machines will have to wait a bit for Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 which will reportedly launch in the second quarter and second half of 2017 respectively. Two six core Ryzen 5 processors will launch somewhere between April and June with the Ryzen 3 quad cores (along with mobile and "Raven Ridge" APU parts) following in the summer to end-of-year timeframe hopefully hitting that back-to-school and holiday shopping launch windows respectively.

AMD Ryzen Die Shot_six core.jpg

Image via reddit (user noiserr). Guru3d has another die shot. Six cores will be created by disabling one core from each CCX.

Thanks to leaks, the two six core Ryzen 5 CPUs are the Ryzen 5 1600X at $259 and Ryzen 5 1500 at $229. The Ryzen 5 1600X is a 95W TDP CPU with six cores and twelve threads at 3.6 GHz base to 4.0 GHz boost with 16MB of L3 cache. AMD is pitting this chip against the Intel Core i5 7600K which is a $240 quad core Kaby Lake part sans Hyper-Threading. Meanwhile, the Ryzen 5 1500 is a 65W processor clocked at 3.2 GHz base and 3.5 GHz boost with 16 MB of L3 cache.

Note that the Ryzen 5 1600X features AMD's XFR (extreme frequency) technology which the Ryzen 5 1500 lacks. Both processors are unlocked and can be overclocked, however. 

Interestingly, Antony Leather over at Forbes managed to acquire some information on how AMD is making these six core parts. According to his source, AMD is disabling one core (and its accompanying L2 cache) from each four core Core Complex (CCX). Doing this this way (rather than taking two cores from one CCX) should keep things balanced. It also allows AMD to keep all of the processors 16MB of L3 cache enabled and each of the remaining three cores of each complex will be able to access the L3 cache as normal. Previous rumors had suggested that the CCXes were "indivisible" and six cores were not possible, but it appears that AMD is able to safely disable at least one core of a complex without compromising the whole thing. I doubt we will be seeing any odd number core count CPUs from AMD though (like their old try at selling tri-core parts that later were potentially able to be unlocked). I am glad that AMD was able to create six core parts while leaving the entire L3 cache intact.

What is still not clear is whether these six core Ryzen 5 parts are made by physically disabling the core from the complex or if the cores are simply disabled/locked out in the micro code or BIOS/UEFI. It would be awesome if, in the future when yields are to the point where binning is more for product segmentation than because of actual defects, those six core processors could be unlocked! 

The top end Ryzen 7 processors are looking to be great performers and a huge leap over Excavator while at least competing with Intel's latest at multi-threaded performance (I will wait for independent benchmarks for single threaded where even from AMD the benchmark scores are close although these benchmark runs look promising). These parts are relatively expensive though, and the cheaper Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 (and Raven Ridge APUs) are where AMD will see the most potential sales due to a much bigger market. I am looking forward to seeing more information on the lower end chips and how they will stack up against Intel and its attempts to shift into high gear with moves like enabling Hyper-Threading on lower end Kaby Lake Pentiums and possibly on new Core i5s (that's still merely a rumor though). Intel certainly seems to be taking notice of Ryzen and the reignited competition in the desktop processor space is very promising for consumers!

Are you holding out for a six core or quad core Ryzen CPU or are you considering a jump to the high-end Ryzen 7s?

Source: TechPowerUp

Podcast #438 - Vulkan, Logitech G213, Ryzen Preorders, and more!

Subject: Editorial | February 23, 2017 - 05:16 PM |
Tagged: podcast, vulkan, ryzen, qualcomm, Qt, mesh, g213, eero, corsair, bulldog

PC Perspective Podcast #438 - 02/23/17

Join us for Vulkan one year later, Logitech G213 Keyboard, eero home mesh networking, Ryzen Pre Orders, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Allyn Malventano, Ken Addison, Josh Walrath, Jermey Hellstrom

Program length: 0:58:01

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. Allyn: SS64.com - Nifty programmer's reference for scripting, web, db
    2. Ken: Dell refurbished XPS 13
  4. Closing/outro
 

Source:

Flipped your lid and want to reattach it?

Subject: Processors | February 23, 2017 - 04:07 PM |
Tagged: Intel, Skylake, kaby lake, delidding, relidding

[H]ard|OCP have been spending a lot of time removing the integrated heatspreader on recent Intel chips to see what effect it has on temperatures under load.  Along the way we picked up tips on 3D printing a delidder and thankfully there was not much death along the way.  One of their findings from this testing was that it can be beneficial to reattach the lid after changing out the thermal interface material and they have published a guide on how to do so.   You will need a variety of tools, from Permatex Red RTV to razor blades, by way of isopropyl alcohol and syringes; as well as a steady hand.  You may have many of the items on hand already and none are exceptionally expensive.

1487134654mHmb7IfVSy_1_10_l.jpg

"So we have covered a lot about taking your shiny new Intel CPUs apart lately, affectionately known as "delidding." What we have found in our journey is that "relidding" the processor might be an important part of the process as well. But what if you do not have a fancy tool that will help you put Humpty back together again?"

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: [H]ard|OCP

30 nanoseconds is way too slow, down with the latency gap!

Subject: General Tech | February 23, 2017 - 03:45 PM |
Tagged: hbll, cache, l3 cache, Last Level Cache

There is an insidious latency gap lurking in your computer between your DRAM and your CPUs L3 cache.  The size of the latency depends on your processor as not all L3 cache are created equally but regardless there are wasted CPU cycles which could be reclaimed.   Piecemakers Technology, the Industrial Technology Research Institute of Taiwan and Intel are on the case, with a project to design something to fit in that niche between the CPU and DRAM.  Their prototype Last Level Cache is a chip with 17ns latency which would improve the efficiency at which L3 cache could be filled to pass onto the next level in the CPU.  The Register likens it to the way Intel has fit XPoint between the speed of SSDs and DRAM.  It will be interesting to see how this finds its way onto the market.

dram_l3_cache_gap.jpg

"Jim Handy of Objective Analysis writes about this: "Furthermore, there's a much larger latency gap between the processor's internal Level 3 cache and the system DRAM than there is between any adjacent cache levels.""

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register
Subject: Motherboards
Manufacturer: GIGABYTE

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

02-20161029174351_big.jpg

Courtesy of GIGABYTE

With the release of Intel Z270 chipset, GIGABYTE is unveiling its AORUS line of products. The AORUS branding will be used to differentiate enthusiast and gamer friendly products from their other product lines, similar to how ASUS uses the ROG branding to differentiate their high performance product line. The Z270X-Gaming 5 is among the first to be released as part of GIGABYTE's AORUS line. The board features the black and white branding common to the AORUS product line, with the rear panel cover and chipset featuring the brand logos. The board is designed around the Intel Z270 chipset with in-built support for the latest Intel LGA1151 Kaby Lake processor line (as well as support for Skylake processors) and Dual Channel DDR4 memory running at a 2400MHz speed. The Z270X-Gaming 5 can be found in retail with an MSRP of $189.99.

03-board.jpg

Courtesy of GIGABYTE

04-board-flyapart.jpg

Courtesy of GIGABYTE

GIGABYTE integrated the following features into the Z270X-Gaming 5 motherboard: three SATA-Express ports; one U.2 32Gbps port; two M.2 PCIe x4 capable ports with Intel Optane support built-in; two RJ-45 GigE ports - an Intel I219-V Gigabit NIC and a Rivet Networks Killer E2500 NIC; three PCI-Express x16 slots; three PCI-Express x1 slots; ASMedia 8-Channel audio subsystem; integrated DisplayPort and HDMI video ports; and USB 2.0, 3.0, and 3.1 Type-A and Type-C port support.

Continue reading our preview of the GIGABYTE Z270X-Gaming 5 motherboard!

FSP Group Launches CMT210 Mid-Tower ATX Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 23, 2017 - 06:44 AM |
Tagged: mid tower, led, FSP Group, fsp, atx

Today FSP Group (a company mainly known for power supplies with headquarters in Taiwan) is launching a new mid tower ATX computer case called the CMT210. The new PC mid-tower features a transparent side window, black angular exterior with LED accents, and a focus on cooling performance. The 460mm x 220mm x 432mm steel case is aimed at gamers and enthusiasts that want to show off their PC internals.

FSP Chassis_CMT210_Product Image.jpg

The front of the CMT210 mid tower is dominated by a massive filtered vent that houses up to three 120mm fans or a 360mm water cooling radiator. The large vent with angled “water droplet” mesh is surrounded by a shroud that features colored accents in either black, red, silver, or deep blue depending on the model you choose. Up top the case offers two audio jacks, two USB 3.0 ports, and a single USB 2.0 port. (The USB 3.0 ports can be plugged into a USB 2.0 motherboard header with the included adapter if you are still holding off on upgrading to Kaby Lake or Ryzen.)

The top of the case is flat with no vents, and there are also no vents on the bottom. Instead there is a single 120mm exhaust fan vent at the rear of the case. FSP includes two of its own 120mm LED fans with the case that come pre-installed in the front and back.

The CMT210 is compatible with ATX motherboards, seven PCI slots, three 3.5” and three 2.5” tool-less drive bays, CPU coolers up to 160mm high and graphics cards up to 360mm long, and ATX power supplies (20.5cm). The power supply is bottom mounted in this case and the storage drives are snapped into trays in the bottom-front caddy and motherboard tray. There are cutouts for cable routing but no rubber grommets (not the end of the world, but they are a nice touch).

FSP claims that its new case is designed with "cooling, expansion, and compatibility" in mind. It is available now in the US though pricing is still unknown as retailers have not put up product pages yet. For more information on the CMT210 you can find details on this product page and this video.

I am curious how well the cooling setup will work with only a single exhaust fan especially if you had a multi GPU setup with aftermarket coolers. Hopefully Sebastian can put it through its paces at some point to examine the build quality and cooling prowess claims. If the price is right, it could be a good budget case as it does not look too bad and does not go crazy with LEDs and bling which is nice to see (I may just be getting old though haha).

What are your thoughts on PSU maker FSP Group getting into the case market?

Source: FSP

Ryzen powered PC pre-orders

Subject: Processors | February 22, 2017 - 08:32 PM |
Tagged: Cyberpower, maingear, origin, ncix

I am not one to recommend preordering anything but there are plenty of consumers out there that are, as you can tell by how quickly the new Ryzen processors are selling.  Here is a quick look at three of the system builders offerings you can order as of today.

CyberPower

unnamed.jpg

maingear.png

They offer four different systems, with all but their new Hyper Liquid model using a Corsair H60 CLC for cooling and 8GB of dual channel DDR4.  All systems come with a 3-year limited warranty and lifetime tech support
 

Maingear

really maingear.PNG

Maingear is more cooling focused, with custom watercooling available in traditional soft tubing and hardline options.  They also offer MAINGEAR Redline Overclocking, so your Ryzen powered system will arrive already running at higher that reference frequencies.  You will pay a little more but they do put effort into the paint and aesthetics.

Origin

0222-ryzen-presale-2.png

Origin's systems start shipping on March 12th, with NEURON, MILLENNIUM and GENESIS desktops which come with free lifetime US-based 24/7 support.  They offer  Variable Mounting which allows you a choice between four motherboard mounting orientations, choose the appropriate one based on your preferred cooling solution.  You can also add remote controlled LEDs and in some models, up to 34 drives can be installed.

NCIX

amd_ryzen_preorder_950x300.jpg

boards.png

Last but not least is NCIX who not only offer several choices of custom systems but also list a wide variety of AM4 motherboards and compatible coolers for you to order individually.  The lower end B350 boards look to retail around $150 while some of the high end X370 boards are over $400.  The X370 above features two M.2 NVMe PCIe x4 slots with heatshields while the B350 has only one, exposed to the world. 

 

It's a race to the pointy stikk! DoW 3 trailer drops

Subject: General Tech | February 22, 2017 - 07:04 PM |
Tagged: gaming, dawn of war III, wauughh

Dawn of War certainly changes from version to version.  The first involved standard RTS fare, build bases and upgrade using resources collected on the map.  The second was more squad based, with a hero leading meatshields into the fray.  The third incarnation seems to lead off of the gameplay of the second, with at least some base and resource management making a comeback. 

The new feature are superunits, extremely large and destructive units which you will gain access to as you take over portions of the map.  Details are still a bit light but the game engine certainly looks pretty.  You can pop by Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN to find a few of the other older teaser trailers.

"This cinematic-o-gameclip video introduces the broad story in Relic’s RTS and yes, it does basically boil down to finding a pointy stick. But what better item to fight over? If you can win a fight without a pointy stick, just imagine how powerful you’ll be once you get one!"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Are you sure that's wise? Samsung is shrinking the Note 7's battery so they can sell refurbs

Subject: General Tech | February 22, 2017 - 04:27 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, note 7

From what Slashdot is reporting we are unlikely to see refurbished Note 7s in North America but they will be appearing in markets on the far side of the Pacific.  The battery was determined to be the cause of the rather spectacular failure of Samsung's latest tablet and so they will be installing a battery with a smaller capacity in the refurbished models.  One hopes it is physically smaller or more carfeully manufactured, as it was the expansion and puncturing of the battery which caused them to burst into flames.  It is understandable that Samsung would like to recoup some losses, this seems like a very risky move to undertake.

url.jpg

"Samsung is said to be swapping the Note 7's 3,500 mAh batteries with a "3,000 to 3,200 mAh" batteries, according to The Korean Economic Daily's sources, predominately for sale in emerging markets such as India and Vietnam."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Slashdot

AMD Ryzen Pre-order Starts Today, Specs and Performance Revealed

Subject: Processors | February 22, 2017 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: Zen, ryzen, preorder, pre-order, handbrake, Cinebench, amd

I know that many of you have been waiting months and years to put your money down for the Zen architecture and Ryzen processors from AMD. Well that day is finally here: AMD is opening pre-orders for Ryzen 7 1800X, Ryzen 7 1700X and Ryzen 7 1700 processors.

That’s the good news. The bad news? You’ll be doing it without the guidance of independent reviews.

For some of you, that won’t matter. And I can respect that! Getting your hands on Ryzen and supporting the disruption that it offers is something not only AMD fans have been preparing for, but tens of thousands of un-upgraded enthusiasts as well.

slides1wm.jpg

Sorry...AMD doesn't trust with slides it seems.

Proudly announced at our meeting with AMD this week, Zen not only met the 40% IPC goals it announced more than a year ago, but exceeded it! AMD claims more than a 52% increase in instructions per clock over Excavator and that is a conservative metric based on side conversations. This does a couple of things for the CPU market immediately: first it resets performance expectations for what Ryzen will offer when reviews do go live and second, it may actually put some worry into Intel.

AMD is allowing us to share baseline specifications of the processors, including clock speeds and core counts, as well as some selected benchmarks that show the Ryzen CPUs in an (obviously) favorable light.

  Ryzen R7 1800X Ryzen R7 1700X Ryzen R7 1700 Core i7-6900K Core i7-6800K Core i7-7700K
Architecture Zen Zen Zen Broadwell-E Broadwell-E Kaby Lake
Process Tech 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm+
Cores/Threads 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 6/12 4/8
Base Clock 3.6 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.0 GHz 3.2 GHz 3.4 GHz 4.2 GHz
Turbo/Boost Clock 4.0 GHz 3.8  GHz 3.7 GHz 3.7 GHz 3.6 GHz 4.5 GHz
Cache 20MB 20MB 20MB 20MB 15MB 8MB
TDP 95 watts 95 watts 65 watts 140 watts 140 watts 91 watts
Price $499 $399 $329 $1050 $450 $350

AMD is being extremely aggressive with these prices and with the direct comparisons. The flagship Ryzen 7 1800X will run you just $499, the 1700X at $399 and the 1700 at $329. For AMD’s own comparisons, they pitted the Ryzen 7 1800X against the Core i7-6900K from Intel, selling for more than 2x the cost. Both CPUs have 8 cores and 16 threads, the AMD Ryzen part has higher clock speeds as well. If IPC is equivalent (or close), then it makes sense that the 1800X would be a noticeably faster part. If you care about performance per dollar even more…you should be impressed.

For the other comparisons, AMD is pitting the Ryzen 7 1700X with 8 cores and 16 threads against the Core i7-6800K, with 6 cores and 12 threads. Finally, the Ryzen 7 1700, still with an 8C/16T setup, goes against the Core i7-7700K with just 4 cores and 8 threads.

Here is a summary of the performance comparisons AMD is allowing to be showed.

perf1-wm.jpg

perf2-wm.jpg

Though it's only a couple of benchmarks, and the results are highly siloed to show Ryzen in the best light, the results are incredibly impressive. In Cinebench R15, the Ryzen 1800X is 9% faster than the Core i7-6900K but at half the price; even the Ryzen R7 1700X is beating it. The 1700X is 34% faster than the Core i7-6800K, and the 1700 is 31% faster than the quad-core Core i7-7700K. The only single threaded result AMD gave us shows matching performance from the Core i7-6900K based on the Intel Broadwell architecture and the new Ryzen R7 1800X. This might suppress some questions about single threaded performance of Ryzen before reviews, but Broadwell is a couple generations old in Intel’s lineup, so we should expect Kaby Lake to surpass it.

The Handbrake benchmark results only included Core i7-7700K and the Ryzen R7 1700, with the huge advantage going to AMD. Not unexpected considering the 2x delta in core and thread count.

perf3-wm.jpg

Finally, the performance per dollar conversion on the Cinebench scores is a substantially impactful visual. With a more than 2x improvement from the Ryzen 7 1800X to the Core i7-6900K, power-hungry users on a budget will have a lot to think about.

slides2wm.jpg

Sorry...AMD doesn't trust with slides it seems.

Clearly, AMD is very proud of the Ryzen processor and the Zen architecture, and they should be. This is a giant leap forward for the company compared to previous desktop parts. If you want to buy in today and pre-order, we have links below. If you’d rather wait for a full review from PC Perspective (or other outlets), you only have to wait until March 2nd.

Update Feb 22 @ 4:27am: An official Intel spokesman did respond to today's AMD news with the following: 

“We take any competition seriously but as we’ve learned, consumers usually take a ‘wait and see’ approach on performance claims for untested products. 7th Gen Intel® Core™ delivers the best experiences, and with 8th Gen Intel Core and new technologies like Intel® Optane™ memory coming soon, Intel will not stop raising the bar.” ­

While nothing drastic, the Intel comment is interesting in a couple of ways. First, the fact that Intel is responding at all means that they are rattled to some degree. Second, mention of the 8th Gen Core processor series indicates that they want potential buyers to know that something beyond Kaby Lake is coming down the pipe, a break from Intel's normally stoic demeanor.

Source: AMD

AMD Ryzen CPUs Will Be Available With New Stock Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 22, 2017 - 06:04 AM |
Tagged: Wraith, ryzen, hsf, AMD Wraith, amd

Information recently leaked online detailing how AMD will package its retail Ryzen offerings. In addition to the usual processor-only trays for OEMs and system integrators, AMD will offer retail boxed Ryzen processors with a basic HSF (heatsink-fan), circular 95W Wraith Spire cooler, 140W Wraith Max HSF depending on the processor as well as CPU-only boxes of the X-series (e.g. Ryzen 7 1700X) processors for enthusiasts looking to choose their own air or liquid cooler.

AMD Ryzen Cooling Solutions.jpg

Image via Informtica Cero.

TechPowerUp is reporting that a basic cooler similar to AMD’s pre-Wraith style of heatsinks will be packaged with the lower end Ryzen 3 and Ryzen 5 chips – mainly the 65W models. Moving up the processor lineup, the non-X Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 processors (up to Ryzen 7 1700) will be bundled with a new “Wraith Spire” cooler that sports a circular design with curved aluminum fins and an (approximately) 80mm fan. This new HSF is rated at 95W and measures 109mm x 103mm x 54mm and is allegedly engineered to be a low noise cooling solution.

Stepping things up a notch, the “Wraith Max” is a tweaked FX-era Wraith cooler (horizontal boxed design with a single fan) that can handle up to 140W processors and has been designed with noise levels in mind while not sacrificing too much performance. It measures 105mm x 108mm x 85mm so it is a fair bit taller than the Wraith Spire. This cooler will come with the higher end eight core Ryzen chips such as the Ryzen 7 1700X and 1800X.

The X variants will also be available in WOF (without fan-heatsink) packages that come in retail boxes but without any heatsink. These WOF packages should come in a bit cheaper than the processor+HSF multipacks and will be ideal for users wanting to use liquid cooling or a higher end air cooler for overclocking.

Thanks to previous leaks that have revealed the box art, AMD will be clearly marking the retail packages to show which cooler is coming with which processor. Further, XFastest has posted images of the basic Ryzen (non-Wraith) heatsink, and you can see (albeit tiny) images of the Wraith Spire and Wraith Max in the leaked table (above, from Informatica Cero).

Sebastian seemed to be very impressed by the original Wraith cooler where he found it to be a significant improvement over AMD’s previous OEM designs and able to match the Hyper 212 Evo in cooling performance (though the Wraith couldn’t quite match it in noise levels due to its smaller fan). So long as AMD maintains quality control and builds on the previous Wraith’s strengths (and hopefully larger fans, at least on the Max), they should be good little coolers. I am interested to see the new Wraith coolers in detail and how well they perform. I suspect many readers will be opting for the CPU-only packages, but for those readers that just want a simple bundled cooling solution I hope the Wraith Spire and Wraith Max turn out to be good deals.

Also read:

Source: TechPowerUp

Intel Details Optane Memory System Requirements

Subject: General Tech, Storage | February 22, 2017 - 12:14 AM |
Tagged: Optane, kaby lake, Intel, 3D XPoint

Intel has announced that its Optane memory will require an Intel Kaby Lake processor to function. While previous demonstrations of the technology used an Intel Skylake processor, it appears this configuration will not be possible on the consumer versions of the technology.

Intel Optane App Accelerator.jpg

Further, the consumer application accelerator drives will also require a 200-series chipset motherboard, and either a M.2 2280-S1-B-M or M.2 2242-S1-B-M connector with two or four PCI-E lanes. Motherboards will have to support NVMe v1.1 and Intel RST (Rapid Storage Technology) 15.5 or newer.

It is not clear why Intel is locking Optane technology to Kaby Lake and whether it is due to technical limitations that they were not able to resolve to keep Skylake compatible or if it is just a matter of not wanting to support the older platform and focus on its new Kaby Lake processors. As such, Kaby Lake is now required if you want UHD Blu Ray playback and Optane 3D XPoint SSDs.

What are your thoughts on this latest bit of Optane news? Has Intel sweetened the pot enough to encourage upgrade hold outs?

Also Read: 

 

Source: Bit-Tech

The uncommon and very yellow Reeven Okeanos RC-1402

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 21, 2017 - 08:56 PM |
Tagged: reeven, Okeanos, Okeanos RC-1402

The Okeanos RC-1402 is a large hunk of metal, standing 140x135x163mm and weighing in at 1145g when both the 12cm and 14cm fans are attached.  This makes it just a bit smaller than Morry's beloved Noctua NH-D15, which will allow it to fit into slightly tighter builds.  [H]ard|OCP tested it on an i7-4770K and found its performance to be acceptable but not outstanding in any way.  Unfortunately, the price does stand out as it costs more than coolers which offer equivalent performance. Drop by for a look at their whole review.

1483479388eXaQ2C2BoR_2_1.png

"The Reeven Okeanos RC-1402 is not exactly a new CPU air cooler, but it is not widely available in the United States so it has not gotten a lot of coverage in North America. The cost for the cooler is not low, and two staggered-sized fans are included in the box, so we have fairly high performance expectations for this twin tower cooler."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Should you hang out on the Bridge, or is it worth heading onto the Lake?

Subject: Systems | February 21, 2017 - 06:55 PM |
Tagged: upgrade, sandybridge, kaby lake

The tick-tock of Intel's waltz has stuttered a bit, with many users wondering if it is worth picking up a new Kaby Lake based system.  Gone are the good old days when a new generation of processors guaranteed enough of an increase in performance to justify decreasing your bank account immediately.  There are several reasons for this, including the difficulties in reducing the size of the process and increasing the amount of transistors, not just the current lack of competition in the marketplace.

At The Tech Report, one of their staff were curious enough to do the upgrade, dumping their  i7-2600K for an i7-7700k.  Check out the results of the upgrade, with some impressive effect on the wonky but beloved Arma III engine.

20170204105220_1.jpg

"The question of whether it's worth upgrading from Intel's Sandy Bridge chips accompanies every new TR CPU review. For one TR contributor, the arrival of Kaby Lake finally motivated him to make a move. See what the upgrade to a more modern platform did for him."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

A good year to sell GPUs

Subject: General Tech | February 21, 2017 - 06:18 PM |
Tagged: jon peddie, marketshare, graphics cards

The GPU market increased 5.6% from Q3 to Q4 of 2016, beating the historical average of -4.7% by quite a large margin, over the year we saw an increase of 21.1%.  That increase is even more impressive when you consider that the total PC market dropped 10.1% in the same time, showing that far more consumers chose to upgrade their existing machines instead of buying new ones.  This makes sense as neither Intel nor AMD offered a compelling reason to upgrade your processor and motherboard for anyone who purchased one in the last two or three years.

AMD saw a nice amount of growth, grabbing almost 8% of the total market from NVIDIA over the year, though they lost a tiny bit of ground between Q3 and Q4 of 2016.  Jon Peddie's sample also includes workstation class GPUs as well as gaming models and it seems a fair number of users chose to upgrade their machines as that market increased just over 19% in 2016.

unnamed.png

"The graphics add-in board market has defied gravity for over a year now, showing gains while the overall PC market slips. The silly notion of integrated graphics "catching up" with discrete will hopefully be put to rest now," said Dr. Jon Peddie, president of Jon Peddie research, the industry's research and consulting firm for graphics and multimedia."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk