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Ubisoft Offers One Free New Game with Eligible Purchase

Subject: General Tech | November 26, 2016 - 06:49 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, ubisoft, ea, bethesda

The Ubisoft store is offering the standard edition of either The Division, Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate, Rainbow Six: Siege, or Far Cry Primal when you purchase (or pre-order) another, participating title. These other games aren’t just from Ubisoft, though. They also include new releases from EA, Bethesda, and SquareEnix, such as Battlefield 1 (which still requires Origin) and Skyrim: Special Edition.

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This is interesting for two reasons. First, and most obvious, if you really want one of the four titles and one of the applicable ones, then it might be cheaper than buying them individually (although you should check for sales elsewhere first).

The second point regards how the various publishers are handling Steam’s dominance in the PC space. EA is now even participating their titles, which are not available on Valve’s service, in promotions from stores owned by other competitors. Meanwhile, it seems like Bethesda is happy putting their stock wherever, and they will even discount games by a third or a half if it aligns with a big Steam Sale. Then we get Ubisoft, who has their own store, but also lists on Steam and does fairly good sales there, too.

Anyway, the sale is running until the 27th. As I said earlier, though, be sure that any combination of game that interests you is actually cheaper than their respective sale price at competing stores before buying.

Source: Ubisoft

Samsung Denies PC Business Acquisition Talks with Lenovo

Subject: Systems | November 26, 2016 - 04:21 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, Lenovo

thebell, a Korean news outlet and sister site of ZDNet Korea, published a rumor that Samsung was in talks to sell their PC business to Lenovo. While I’m struggling with the Google Translate from Korean, it sounds like this would be caused by Samsung selling their printing business to HP, leading to the company divesting from related markets, too. This news was picked up by the American ZDNet and, some time after, Samsung released a statement outright denying the rumor: “The rumor is not true.”

So, as far as we know, Samsung is staying in the PC market.

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Since it was a clear denial, not a decline to comment, this probably means that the rumor is either completely false, or, if it’s based on a kernel of truth, it’s very early or very tiny. It seems likely, though, that Lenovo would want to buy up pretty much anyone’s PC business at this point, if the price is right. As for Samsung selling? I could see it being something that could have been discussed behind-the-scenes to some level of seriousness, although that’s what hoaxes prey upon. Again, as far as we know, Samsung will keep their PC business, and there isn’t really anything concrete to say otherwise.

Source: ZDNet

Valve Adds Support for OSVR

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 08:51 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, VR, osvr, razer, sensics

There’s a few competing VR standards at the moment. Obviously, mobile has a bunch of them; Google technically has two of their own. On the PC, the top two are Oculus and SteamVR. A third one, Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR), was co-founded by Razer and Sensics.

Valve has now added their platform to Steam, including the tools that users will need to filter compatible content for that headset.

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OSVR is an interesting initiative. For instance, when they released their second developer’s kit, HDK2, they also released an upgrade kit for the original. Currently priced at $220, it upgrades the screen to 2160x1200. They also have a Leap Motion upgrade, although that’s currently listed as “coming soon”. It has also been added to Unreal Engine 4 for the last few versions, so engine developers are considering it worthy of first-party support.

Source: OSVR

AOC Announces AGON AG251FZ 240Hz FreeSync Monitor

Subject: Displays | November 25, 2016 - 08:29 PM |
Tagged: AOC, 240Hz, freesync

This is just getting silly. While TN, 1080p monitors have been fading into the background, they are fast switching, and AOC is pushing that advantage. The AOC AGON AG251FZ is a 25-inch FreeSync display that can support up to 240 Hz refresh rates. They’re not the first monitor to reach this milestone, as Acer made a similar announcement back in August, but this display should be bright and smooth, especially for our readers with AMD GPUs.

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If you like to smoothly scroll documents, then you may also appreciate that its stand can pivot into portrait mode. I doubt it will have the best color representation, though, so those who want to photo edit, especially outside of sRGB, may want to look elsewhere. In fact, they don’t even list their sRGB (web and video) or AdobeRGB (video and print) coverage. I’d hope it would at least have 100% sRGB, but I can’t say for sure.

TechPowerUp claims that it will launch in January for about £449 GBP.

Source: AOC

Japan Announces $173 Million USD Supercomputer

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 07:47 PM |
Tagged: Japan, supercomputer

According to Reuters, Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry have set aside 19.5 billion yen to build a high-end supercomputer. This will translate into 130 PetaFLOPs, which would put it ahead of all other announced clusters. The article claims that the government will rent the computer out to Japanese corporations, many of which currently use American-based cloud services.

The supercomputer has been named ABCI: AI Bridging Cloud Infrastructure.

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Image Credit: つ via Wikipedia

From a hardware standpoint? There’s not a whole lot else to say about it. The money has been set aside, but no-one has been selected to build it. Companies will submit their bids by December 8th, and we assume they’ll make an announcement at some point after.

This also means we don’t know what is planned to go into each node. Despite targeting ABCI at AI, Japan is sticking to the “FLOPs” rating, and thus will probably be focused on floating-point workloads. It would be weird to see such an expensive machine be focused on 8- or 16-bit instructions, but then we see Google creating custom ASICs, called TPUs, that seem to get huge performance boosts by sticking to low-precision workloads. Could that even scale to a competitive supercomputer? Or would it cut out too many potential customers that need 32- and 64-bit precision?

Either way, I would guess that this computer will use more conventional, GPU-style co-processors from someone like Intel (Xeon Phi) or NVIDIA. Really, we don’t know, though. No-one does at this point. It’s an interesting branding, though.

Source: Reuters

Just Picked Up: Logitech G900 and G810

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 06:39 PM |
Tagged: logitech, mouse, keyboard, g900, g810

I braved the Black Friday lines... at about three in the afternoon, because this guy isn’t going to get trampled for discounts on computer hardware. Luckily, Best Buy still had a single G900 Chaos Spectrum mouse in stock at 50% off, and a few G810 Orion Spectrum keyboards at about 35% off. I was actually looking to pick them up on Boxing Week if they dropped in price, because I surprisingly needed another mechanical keyboard, but this is even better than I expected.

So, I picked up one of each.

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One of the things that attracted me to the G900 was its ambidextrous design with a tilt scroll wheel. It’s surprisingly hard to get a mouse for left-handed users that also has four directions of scrolling. The 2014 left-handed edition of the Razer Naga has a tilt wheel, although its left and right mouse buttons are swapped, so those who are used to right-handed mice will need to wait until Razer Synapse loads and connects to reverse them to left-on-left and right-on-right. What I’m trying to say is that, for the last two years, my old mouse would have left button right-click and right button left-click until my profile abruptly kicked in about 30 seconds after login. I don’t need to deal with that anymore, while still keeping the mouse tilt wheel.

I did notice that Logitech’s G Software refuses to allow binding scroll wheel input to mouse buttons (which I attach to my thumb buttons for comfortable scrolling). Both EVGA and Razer allow this, albeit you need to perform a full click for each notch, short of writing an AutoHotkey macro. It’s not too bad, because you can bind the keyboard’s up and down arrows instead, but scrolling and arrows might not behave the same in all applications, such as with Tweetdeck.

As for the G810, this keyboard feels really nice. The coating of the keycaps are nice and non-stick, the RomerG switches feel pretty good to me, keeping in mind my favorite Cherry MX switch is the MX Brown, and the keyboard’s feet are possible the best I’ve used. There are actually two sets of feet: one set that inclines the keyboard to about 4 degrees, and another that raises it to about 8 degrees. (These values are written on them.) Even better, it’s stable and takes quite a bit of force to slide.

I would prefer it to have a couple of macro keys, even a single row of them, but there’s only so much I can ask for. The media keys are RGB backlit and surprisingly clicky. I’m not sure what type of switch they use, but it feels mechanical... but a very short one like you would see on a mouse, not a keyboard. The G810 also has a volume roller, which I was a huge fan of when I was introduced to it with the first generation of Corsair K60 and K90 mechanical keyboards. (If another brand did it before them, in 2012, then I’m sorry! Corsair was the first that I’ve seen do it!) I should note that the Logitech roller is a bit smoother than the Corsair one, but, again, the K60 and K90 are about four years old at this point.

So yeah, that’s about it.

MSI's mercurial new GTX 1070

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 25, 2016 - 01:21 PM |
Tagged: msi, gtx 1070, GTX 1070 Quick Silver, factory overclocked

MSI's new Quick Silver design looks very different from most of their other cards, black and silver with a shiny metal backplate as opposed to the red and black we are used to.  The GTX 1070 which TechPowerUp reviewed has a bit of a factory overclock, the base Core clock is 76MHz higher than the default at 1582MHz though they have left the VRAM at the default frequency.  There is headroom left in the card, TechPowerUp hit a stable 2101MHz Core, 2290MHz VRAM, not the best results they have seen but certainly a decent increase.  Drop by for a look at its performance in over a dozen games.

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"MSI's GTX 1070 Quick Silver does away with the red-and-black color theme and uses stylish silver instead. Thanks to the powerful cooler from the GTX 1070 Gaming Z, the card is the coolest and quietest GTX 1070 we ever tested. It also comes at a rather affordable $425."

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Source: TechPowerUp

Tesla stores your Owner Authentication token in plain text ... which leads to a bad Ashton Kutcher movie

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 12:52 PM |
Tagged: Android, Malware, hack, tesla, security

You might expect better from Tesla and Elon Musk but apparently you would be dissappointed as the OAuth token in your cars mobile app is stored in plain text.  The token is used to control your Tesla and is generated when you enter in your username and password.  It is good for 90 days, after which it requires you to log in again so a new token can be created.  Unfortunately, since that token is stored as plain text, someone who gains access to your Android phone can use that token to open your cars doors, start the engine and drive away.  Getting an Android user to install a malicious app which would allow someone to take over their device has proven depressingly easy.  Comments on Slashdot suggest it is unreasonable to blame Tesla for security issues in your devices OS, which is hard to argue; on the other hand it is impossible for Telsa to defend choosing to store your OAuth in plain text.

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"By leveraging security flaws in the Tesla Android app, an attacker can steal Tesla cars. The only hard part is tricking Tesla owners into installing an Android app on their phones, which isn't that difficult according to a demo video from Norwegian firm Promon. This malicious app can use many of the freely available Android rooting exploits to take over the user's phone, steal the OAuth token from the Tesla app and the user's login credentials."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

Rumor: Microsoft Working on x86 Emulation for ARM64

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: x86, windows 10, microsoft, arm

According to Mary Jo Foley at ZDNet, Microsoft is working on emulating the x86 instruction set on ARM64. Her sources further claim that this is intended to be a Windows 10 feature that is targeting Redstone 3, which is the feature update expected in late 2017 (after the upcoming Creators Update in early 2017). Of course, Microsoft will not comment on this rumor. Mary Jo Foley is quite good at holding out on publishing until she gets multiple, independent sources, though. Still, projects slip, pivot, and outright die all of the time, even if the information was true at one point.

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Media Center is still dead, though.

So, while keeping in mind that this might not be true, and, even if it is, it could change: let’s think.

The current speculation is that this might be aimed at enterprise customers, including a potential partnership with HP and Qualcomm. This makes sense for a few reasons, especially when you combine it with Microsoft and Samsung’s recent efforts to port .NET Core to ARM. Combining rumors like this might be akin to smashing two rocks together, but you never know if it’ll spark something. Anyway, you would expect these sorts of apps could jump architectures fairly well, because they’re probably not real-time, form-based applications. You might be able to get a comfortable enough user experience, even with the inherent overhead of translating individual instructions.

Another possibility is that Microsoft hasn’t given up on the Windows 8 / Windows RT vision.

Back in that era, the whole OS seemed designed to push users toward their new platform, Metro. The desktop was an app, and that app contained all of the Win32 bits, isolating them from the rest of the PC and surrounding that tile with everything WinRT. The new platform was seductive for Microsoft in a few ways. First, it was more secure, and people considered Windows the operating system that’s plagued with malware. Second, it let them assert control over their apps, like Apple does with their App Store. At the time, they even demanded that third-party web browsers be nothing more than re-skins of Internet Explorer. Firefox? Don’t even think about bringing Gecko in here. It’s Trident or bust.

Say what you like about those first two points, I know I have, and often disapprovingly from an art enthusiast standpoint, but there was a third one that also interested Microsoft:

Hardware independence.

The WinRT runtime, when it was first unveiled, was pretty much designed in a way that Microsoft could swap out everything underneath it if they wanted to jump ship and move to a new architecture. At the time, almost a decade ago, Intel wasn’t competitive against ARM in the mobile space. This kept Windows applications, and Microsoft, watching the rest of the world sail away.

But supporting both ARM and x86 isn’t good enough. What if IBM wins next time? Or a completely different instruction set? If everything calls an API that can be uprooted and transplanted elsewhere? There will never need to be this mobile concern again.

But then we have this whole decades of stuff that already exists problem. While I don’t like the frog boil analogy, it could be Microsoft’s attempt to uproot enough x86-locked content that people can accept UWP. I’m not sure that will work out, especially since we rely upon real-time software that is not accepting Windows Store, but it might be their goal.

What do you all think?

Source: ZDNet

Steam Autumn Sale (and Steam Awards Nominations) Begin!

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2016 - 04:17 AM |
Tagged: valve, steam, pc gaming, black friday

Okay, I admit it: I’m a little late on this one. Sorry, all! Sometimes you need to shelf a post because it’s taking forever to write, but you only realize it after days of researching and editing have gone by. In the mean time, simple posts, like this one, begin to collect dust in the queue. You just need to know when to let go, even if it’s temporarily. This time I didn’t.

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Oh well. So Valve decided to host their Autumn Sale from now until 1pm (EST) on Tuesday. To me, a sale that starts just before American Thanksgiving and ends hours after Cyber Monday... seems like a Black Friday sale. They even acknowledge it as such in their announcement, so I guess I’m not alone.

There really isn’t much to say, though. Gabe Newell will get your money via big discounts on new and bundled back catalog games... oh wait, there is. Remember how Steam was pushing “Discovery” with their new store aesthetic? How it was supposed to help users find relevant content within their store? They just decided to create “The Steam Awards”, which are user-nominated through the store listing.

This is quite interesting. From Steam’s perspective, it allows a handful of games to get promoted to a wider audience, which could allow some games break out of their niche. On the other hand, since it is user-selected, it would need a niche to have a chance at that exposure. Whether it helps good games find an audience that would otherwise die off? Not sure. I am interested to see, if this really is a phase in the Discovery initiative, what else will be introduced. Time will tell...

Source: Valve

Never buying Windows again, eh? How about the Linux powered Oryx Pro?

Subject: Mobile | November 24, 2016 - 01:41 PM |
Tagged: ubuntu, Oryx Pro, GTX1060, gaming laptop, desktop replacement

The Oryx Pro is the opposite of most of the laptops you have seen reviewed here recently.  At 15.2x10.7x1.1" and 5.5lbs it is bulkier than the slim laptops dominating the market, not to mention the 2lb power brick.  It also runs Ubuntu 16.04 LTS as opposed to Win10, thankfully the install is well configured for the hardware present according to the review at Ars Technica.  The hardware on the other hand is familiar and rather impressive, a desktop class GTX 1060, an i7-6700HQ, 32GB of RAM, and a 256GB SSD.  The model reviewed at Ars runs you almost $1900 or there is a 17" model, as well as a GTX 1070 upgrade available if you so desire.  Pop by to take a look at the full review of this Linux powered laptop.

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"System76 has a decent range of laptops, from the small, lightweight, battery-sipping Lemur to the top-end beast-like Oryx Pro. And after recently reviewing the svelte, but not necessarily top-end-specced Dell XPS 13, I got curious about this Oryx Pro. On paper, it sounds like a desktop machine somehow packed into a laptop form factor"

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Source: Ars Technica

Have tape over your webcam? Might want to fill your headphones with wax as well!

Subject: General Tech | November 24, 2016 - 12:35 PM |
Tagged: security, hack, audio, Realtec

Security researchers have discovered a way to flip an output channel on onboard Realtec audio into an input channel, thus turning your headphones into an unpowered microphone.  The ability of a speaker or headphone to be used as a microphone is not news to anyone who has played around with headphones or input jacks, but it is possible some readers had deprived childhoods and have never tried this.  While you cannot mitigate this vulnerability permanently you could certainly notice it as your headphones would no longer play audio if the port is configured as input. 

Drop by Slashdot a link, and if you have never tried this out before you really should find an old pair of headphones and experiment with ports as well as snipping off one side of a pair of earbuds.  One supposes iPhone 7 users need not worry.

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"In short, the headphones were nearly as good as an unpowered microphone at picking up audio in a room. It essentially "retasks" the RealTek audio codec chip output found in many desktop computers into an input channel. This means you can plug your headphones into a seemingly output-only jack and hackers can still listen in. This isn't a driver fix, either."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

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Source: Slashdot

Async Compute turning the Gears of War

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2016 - 01:39 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, gears of war 4, gaming, dx12, async compute, amd

[H]ard|OCP sat down with the new DX12 based Gears of War 4 to test the performance of the game on a variety of cards, with a focus on the effect of enabling Async Compute.  In their testing they found no reason for Async Compute to be disabled as it did not hurt the performance of any card.  On the other hand NVIDIA's offerings do not benefit in any meaningful way from the feature and while AMD's cards certainly did, it was not enough to allow you to run everything at maximum on an RX 480.  Overall the game was no challenge to any of the cards except perhaps the RX 460 and the GTX 1050 Ti.  When playing at 4K resolution they saw memory usage in excess of 6GB, making the GTX 1080 the card for those who want to play with the highest graphical settings.  Get more details and benchmarks in their full review.

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"We take Gears of War 4, a new Windows 10 only game supporting DX12 natively and compare performance with seven video cards. We will find out which one provides the best experience at 4K, 1440p, and 1080p resolutions, and see how these compare to each other. We will also look specifically at the Async Compute feature."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Touchless jackpotting, making ATM's disgorge their contents remotely

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2016 - 12:50 PM |
Tagged: hack, bank, atm, security, cobalt

Imagine walking down the street, only to notice an ATM spewing money out of its slots and into a bag held by a shady looking character; but not in a video game.  In at least 14 countries including Russia, the UK, the Netherlands and Malaysia, hackers are using a program dubbed Cobalt to conduct remote logical attacks on ATMs.  These attacks cause the ATM to empty itself, into the waiting hands of an accomplice who only needs to show up at the appropriate time.  As the attacks are conducted remotely the mule may have only the slightest connection to the hackers that compromised the banking system which makes them very hard to catch.  The Inquirer has links to more information on Cobalt, unfortunately they do not have any details on fortunate times or locations to be present at.

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"HACKERS HAVE MANAGED to hack cash machines so that they do what everyone who has ever used one has wanted them to do, which is just spit out cash like it was going out of fashion."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

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Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #426 - Intel Kaby Lake Performance, Corsair Crystal Cases, Q&A and more!

Subject: Editorial | November 23, 2016 - 12:37 PM |
Tagged: Z170X-Ultra Gaming, video, snapdragon 835, Samsung, qualcomm, podcast, kaby lake, Intel, gigabyte, crystal, corsair, 7th generation core, 570x, 10nm

PC Perspective Podcast #426 - 11/23/16

Join us this week as we discuss Intel Kaby Lake performance, a new Corsair Crystal 570X case, Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts:  Ryan Shrout, Allyn Malventano, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom

Program length: 1:23:24

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
    1. 0:41:38 Random thoughts and Q&A!
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. Ryan: Lenovo Phab 2 Pro SD 652, Android 6, 6.4” QHD, 4GB, 64GB, 4050 mAh
  4. Closing/outro

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Check out the twins! FSP's new redundant PSU for consumers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 23, 2016 - 11:56 AM |
Tagged: twins, redundant psu, fsp, 80 Plus Gold, 500W

If you are running a server at home, for instance a PLEX server, which you access while travelling and need it to stay up 24/7 you may have looked into redundant PSUs.  They tend to be expensive and do not easily fit into a standard case, let alone a SFF one.  FSP Group has a solution they call The Twins.

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The Twins are a pair of 500W PSUs in a casing that will fit in most cases, the width and height are the same as a normal ATX PSU, the length of 190mm might be an issue for some cases however.  They are fully hot-swappable and offer redundant power so that if one happens to go out your system will continue to run.

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This 500W unit and the following 700W unit are both 80 PLUS GOLD certified and come with a USB header connection which allows you to use their FSP Guardian software.  FSP Guardian allows you to monitor real time power input, power output, efficiency, and other specs and saves the data for 30 days to let you see how your power systems are behaving.  The non-modular wiring provides you with a pair of 6+2 PCIe connectors and a half dozen SATA connectors in addition to the usual motherboard power connections.

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You can check out the full PR below the specifications listed here.  Both models will come with a 5 year warranty and cost $399 and $499 respectively.

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October 26, 2016 – Taipei, Taiwan – FSP, the performance power specialist, is pleased to announce a new 500W addition to its Twins series redundant Power Supplies, with a 700W version coming soon. Fitting most ATX tower chassis, these PSUs offer consumers a reliable solution for home mail, web, or email servers without needing to jump up to more costly form factors.

Redundant Modules for Reliable 24/7 Operation
The Twins series houses two independent power modules, each with its own power adapter. Under normal conditions, the two modules share the energy load to maximize efficiency and stability. If one module fails, however, the other automatically takes over as a clean fail safe. Being hot-swappable, a failed module can be replaced while the system is running without any downtime.

Compatible with Standard ATX Cases
Users can mount the Twins in standard ATX cases without the need for a special bracket. Both ATX 12V and EPS 12V connectors are provided for maximum motherboard compatibility. Flat ribbon cables save space and installation hassle, perfect for cramped cases.

80 Plus Gold Efficiency and Server-Grade Reliability
Both Twins PSUs are 80 Plus Gold certified, offering up to 90% efficiency. Under constant operation, this drastically cuts down operating costs. Each power supply module features a dedicated dual ball-bearing fan, premium capacitors, and has over current protection, short circuit protection, over voltage protection, and fan failure protection. Reliability is further backed by a MTBF of 100,000 hours and a 5 year warranty.

LED Alarm Guard and Digital Control Software
The LED alarm guard alerts operators to problems in the system and simplifies problem diagnosis. If a power supply fails, an alarm will sound and an LED indicator will show which power supply needs to be replaced. Users can connect the Twins’ to a USB header for FSP’s Guardian software: a full suite of digital monitoring controls. Keep an eye on input, output, efficiency, and other metrics in real time, or review up to seven days of past data.

Availability
The FSP Twins Series is now available in 500W/700W versions at a MSRP of $399/499 USD, respectively.

Source: FSP

Dishonored 2 v1.2 Released with Performance Fixes

Subject: General Tech | November 22, 2016 - 04:57 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, dishonored 2, bethesda

When Dishonored 2 came out, it apparently had quite a few performance issues. Users were complaining about stuttering and low performance, even with high-end graphics cards. One post on Reddit grew popular when an employee of Bethesda allegedly tweeted that a GTX 1070 should get ~60 FPS on Very Low at 1080p. The card is generally recommended for users looking for maxed out 1080p or 1440p for the next couple of years, so you might be able to see the expectation mismatch.

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The second patch, released yesterday, is primarily aimed at performance optimizations. First, NVIDIA users are recommended to upgrade to 375.95, which was pushed to GeForce Experience and their website late last week. Beyond adding an SLI Profile, Bethesda “strongly advise[s]” the driver to fix a performance bug.

On their side, they fixed an issue with AMD GPUs when cloth is simulated and they now allow those cards to use HBAO+. They also allow the user to limit frame rates all the way up to 120 FPS, although the physics engine cannot handle rates above that, so it’s hard-capped there. This sucks for users with 144Hz monitors, but 120 FPS is pretty generous of a cap if one must exist. Bethesda also addressed stuttering and they fixed the engine attempting to allocate more VRAM than the card has. I’m not sure whether this bug led to outright crashes, or just stuttering as the asset is pulled from system RAM or disk, but either way is quite bad.

If you had a problem playing Dishonored 2, then you might want to try again. If you are waiting to purchase, or have already refunded the game, then unfortunately I can’t say whether it’s all better; I haven’t played it, at least not yet.

Acer's Predator XB321HK, the highest resolution G-SNYC monitor you can hope for until DP 1.3?

Subject: General Tech | November 22, 2016 - 02:38 PM |
Tagged: g-sync, Predator XB321HK, acer, 4k, ips

Thanks to DisplayPort 1.2's bandwidth being limited to a maximum of 17.28Gbit/s, shoppers looking for a high end variable refresh rate gaming monitor have a tough choice to make.  Leave aside aspect ratio, colour depth and panel type for the immediate question; do you prefer the higher definition of a 4K display but with a limited maximum refresh rate or will you be satisfied by 1440p or 1080p with a refresh rate that can hit upwards of 200Hz?  The Predator XB321HK chooses path of greater resolution, offering 3840x2160 but with a maximum refresh rate of 60Hz, on an IPS screen with 4ms grey to grey response time.  If you prefer an MVA ultra-widescreen with a higher resolution, perhaps investigate the Acer Z35, if the XB321HK is closer to what you are looking for check Hardware Canucks full review here.

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"With a sensible 4K form factor, a G-SYNC module and a stunning IPS panel, Acer's Predator XB321HK is the stuff gaming monitor dreams are made of. Unfortunately its refresh rate is limited by today's interface technology."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

WoW, Microsoft is back in the porting business again. x86 to ARM expected with Redstone 3

Subject: General Tech | November 22, 2016 - 12:34 PM |
Tagged: CHPE, arm, x86 emulator, x86, windows 10, redstone 3

We haven't seen Windows 10 Redstone 2 yet but already we have some news about Redstone 3 which hints at the coming of the Surface phone.  Microsoft is working on x86 emulation for ARM processors, allowing proper Windows programs and not just Universal Apps to work on ARM based machines.  They pulled this off in the past with the switch from 32bit to 64bit applications, with Windows on Windows emulation and porting x86 to ARM and vice versa has been a long term project at Microsoft. 

The possible issue that comes from this eventuality is the interface.  Just like in a game ported from a gaming platform to PC, moving from an ecosystem with a limited input device to a platform designed with a mouse and keyboard will cause issues.  The reverse tends to be worse, for instance Skyrim's abysmal inventory system exists specifically because it was planned to be released on consoles.  Now imagine Excel or file management software trimmed down and designed specifically to run on a phablet, as well as on a PC.  For more on this possible nightmare, check out The Inquirer.

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"According to Mary-Jo Foley, the font of all knowledge Windows-wise, the company is looking at x86 emulation for ARM processors. It’s not a new idea, but it's looking likely for Redstone 3."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Corsair Introduces Carbide Series 270R Mid-Tower Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 22, 2016 - 11:17 AM |
Tagged: windowed, mid-tower, enclosure, corsair, chassis, case, carbide, 270R

Corsair introduced three new enclosures yesterday, with the Crystal 570X (our review for this case is already live), Crystal 460X (review coming soon!), and this new Carbide Series 270R mid-tower.

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From Corsair:

"Solid, sleek and understated, the CORSAIR Carbide Series 270R offers all the essentials of a high-end PC case, while retaining a spacious internal layout and versatile cooling options. Available with either a huge transparent window or solid side panel, the 270R’s minimalist exterior hides an expansive interior that’s designed to make building a PC as easy as possible. Deep cable routing channels, numerous tie-down points and convieniently located drive bays combine with a dedicated cable routing compartment that surrounds the PSU, making clean and professional builds simple.

The 270R windowed comes equipped with a red-LED lit AF120 120mm intake fan and black AF120 120mm exhaust fan, while the 270R non-windowed ships with a single black AF120 120mm exhaust . Whichever you choose, the 270R offers great out-of-box cooling while also supporting a wealth of liquid cooling radiators and cooling upgrades. Able to mount upto a 360mm radiator in the front and a 240mm radiator in the roof, the 270R can accommodate almost anything your next PC might require, both now and in the future. It’s everything PC builders need for the essential PC build."

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While the other two announced cases feature tempered glass designs, the Carbide 270R is a practical alternative for shoppers on a budget. It combines an understated exterior with an internal layout that Corsair is calling "builder-friendly", and offers a compelling solution with an MSRP of only $69.99.

Corsair lists these features:

  • Builder-friendly with simple and intuitive internal layout.
  • Versatile cooling options with space for multiple radiator configurations.
  • Clean and minimalist exterior design.
  • 270R Windowed includes 1x red-LED lit AF120 120mm intake fan and 1x black AF120 120mm exhaust fan.
  • 270R Non-Windowed includes 1x black AF120 120mm exhaust fan.
  • Built-in cable routing compartments enables clean builds.
  • Direct Airflow Path™ provides airflow to the hottest components.

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Our review of the Carbide Series 270R will be completed soon, so stay tuned!!

Source: Corsair