Connected Data Updates Transporter Line, iOS App, Adds Standard Links

Subject: Storage | March 9, 2015 - 02:50 PM |
Tagged: transporter, filetransporter

Transporter is a pairing of hardware and software to accomplish the goal of having your own personal file storage cloud - but this one scales all the way from a single user to enterprise. Connected Data has been on a bit of a roll these past couple of weeks. First they announced some big updates to their product line:

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Here's a look at the old product line:

Transporter (old).png

...and now the new line:

transporter (new)-.png

The two middle (and likely most popular) tiers have been replaced with a complete hardware redesign. The units that used to borrow from Drobo design cues are now what appear to be the first round of Transporter-specific multi-HDD units. The specs have also been beefed up for those two models, as both now employ dual Gigabit Ethernet with increased capacity and simultaneous user ratings also increased accordingly. You'll still need to step up to the true business tiers for redundant power supplies and rack mountability, but the 15 and 30 should be great for small businesses or remotely located groups within a business.

The new units are priced at $2499 for the 15 (~6TB) and $4999 for the 30 (~9TB). Full details available in their spec sheet (PDF). Full press blast on the above appears after the break.

Next up is an update to their iOS app:

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Updates in this release:

  • Provides storage for your other apps using new iOS 8 Storage Extensions to upload, open, and save files directly to Transporter
  • New VLC video player for enhanced video playback in addition to Apple Player option
  • Faster app startup and additional performance throughout the app
  • New user interface with cleaner layout and folder icons

Integration into iOS's native 'save to' dialog is a welcome addition for an app directly competing with Dropbox.

Finally is the addition of standard links:

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Transporter could previously support direct links, but standard links shift the hosting for those shared files to the Connected Data servers. Since direct links are limited by the speed of the Internet connection of the Transporter hosting the data, standard links can be used to speed up the transfer to multiple users. This would be ideal for family photo albums and other non-confidential files.

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As you can see above, once standard links have been enabled, you still have file-level control of which shared data passes through Connected Data's servers. This means you can still keep those sensitive files restricted to your own device, which is part of the reason for using one of these.

Good stuff coming from these guys. We're working on sampling one of these new models and will report on our experiences as we make them.

Oh, one more thing - they are running a buy one get one free sale on Transporter Sync. Promo code DOUBLELUCK gets you a free ($99) device! This U.S. only deal likely expires on the 17th.

Meet Silicon Motion's new flash agnostic controller

Subject: Storage | March 3, 2015 - 06:16 PM |
Tagged: tlc, ssd, SM2256, slc, silicon motion

You may remember the Silicon Motion SM2256 SSD controller that Al reported on during CES this year, even if you do not you should be interested in a controller which can work with 1x/1y/1z nm TLC NAND from any manufacturer on the market.  The SSD Review managed to get a prototype which uses the new SM2256 controller, Samsung’s 19nm TLC planar NAND flash and a Hynix 440Mhz 256MB DDR3 DRAM chip.  In benchmarking they saw 548MB/s sequential reads and 484MB/s writes, with 4K slowing down to 38MB/s for read and 110MB/s for write.  Check out the rest of the review here as well as keeping your eyes peeled for our first review of the new controller.

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"Controllers are the heart and soul of every SSD. Without one, an SSD would be a useless PCB with some components slapped on it. It is responsible for everything from garbage collection and wear leveling to error correction and hardware encryption. In simple terms, all these operations can be quite complicated to implement as well as expensive to develop."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

List of Upcoming USB 3.1 Devices Expected by Mid-2015

Subject: Storage | February 24, 2015 - 11:11 AM |
Tagged: usb 3.1, usb, msi, asus

Followers of PC Perspective have likely seen a pair of stories previewing the upcoming performance and features of USB 3.1. First we got our hands on the MSI X99A Gaming 9 ACK motherboard and were able to run through our very first hands-on testing with USB 3.1 hardware. The motherboard had built-in USB 3.1 support and a device that was configured with a RAID-0 of Intel SSD 730 Series drives.

We followed that up with a look at the ASUS USB 3.1 implementation that included a PCIe add-on card and a dual-drive mSATA device also in RAID-0. This configuration was interesting because we can theoretically install this $40 product into any system with a free PCI Express slot.

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Performance was astounding for incredibly early implementations, reaching as high as 835 MB/s!

In that last article I theorized that it would be some time before we got our hands on retail USB 3.1 hardware but it appears I wasn't giving the industry enough credit. ASUS passed us a list of incoming devices along with release schedules. There are 27 devices scheduled to be released before the end of April and ~35 by the middle of the year.

It's a daunting table to look at, so be prepared!

Manufacturer name

Product category

Product name

Availability

AKiTiO

USB 3.1 device

Neutrino Bridge USB3.1

March 2015

USB 3.1 device

NT2 U3.1

March 2015

AVLAB Technology SIIG

USB 3.1 to 2.5-inch

USB 3.1 to SATA 2.5-inch Enclosure

April 2015

USB 3.1 to 2.5-inch

USB 3.1 to SATA 2.5-inch Enclosure Pro

Q2-Q3 2015

USB 3.1 to 3.5-inch

USB 3.1 to SATA 3.5-inch Enclosure

April 2015

GODO

2.5-inch USB 3.1 enclosure

GD25602 2.5-inch USB3.1 HDD Enclosure

March 2015

2.5-inch USB 3.1 enclosure

GD25702 2.5-inch USB3.1 HDD Enclosure

March 2015

2.5-inch USB 3.1 enclosure

GD25611 2.5-inch  USB3.1 HDD Enclosure

March 2015

HighPoint Technologies, Inc

USB 3.1 device

RS3111A

March 2015

USB 3.1 device

RS3112A

April 2015

Iomaster

2-port host card

IOT-U31A3

March 2015

SATA 2.5 enclosure 

IOT-3125A3

March 2015

USB 3.1 to SATA 2.5 & 3.5 adapter

IOT-3123A3

April 2015

USB 3.1 to MSATA & M2 SSD enclosure

IOT-U31NF

March 2015

Minerva Innovation Company

3.5-inch SATA to USB 3.1 enclosure

3.5-inch SATA mSATA x 2 and M.2 x 2 to USB 3.1 Adapter (Type B)

March 2015

2.5-inch SATA to USB 3.1 enclosure

2.5-inch SATA mSATA SSD x 2 to USB 3.1 External Enclosure (Type-C x 2)

March 2015

2.5-inch SATA to USB 3.1 enclosure

2.5-inch SATA M.2 SSD x 2 to USB 3.1 External Enclosure  (Type-C x 2)

April 2015

Speed Dragon

USB 3.1 device

USB 3.1 to SATA 6G cable adapter

March 2015

USB 3.1 device

USB 3.1 PCI-Express add-on card

March 2015

USB 3.1 device

USB 3.1 PCI-Express add-on card

March 2015

USB 3.1 device

USB 3.1 to dual SATA 6G hard drive enclosure

April 2015

Super Talent Technology Corporation

USB 3.1 device

USB3.1 Portable SSD

May 2015

Sunrich Technology

Adapter

U-1040 USB 3.1 to SATA 6G Adapter

March 2015

Adapter

U-1050 USB 3.1 to SATA 6G Adapter

April 2015

Hub

U-1060 USB 3.1 4-Port Hub

TBA

Hub

U-1070 USB 3.1 7-Port Hub

TBA

Docking station

U-1080 USB 3.1 Docking Station

TBA

Docking station

U-1090 USB 3.1 Docking Station

TBA

UNITEK

PCI Express to 2 Ports USB 3.1 (Type-A x 2)

Y-7305

March 2015

PCI Express to 2 Ports USB 3.1 (Type-A x 1, Type-C x 1)

Y-7306

March 2015

USB 3.1 to SATA6G enclosure

Y-3363

April 2015

USB 3.1 to SATA6G Docking station

Y-3605

April 2015

USB 3.1 to 2.5-inch Dual SATA6G enclosure (Type-C)

Y-3364

April 2015

USB 3.1 active extension cable

Y-3001

June 2015

The product categories are mostly dominated by the likes of the a USB 3.1 to 2.5-in adapter; that would be useful but you aren't going to top out the performance of the USB 3.1 with a single 2.5-in SATA device. Iomaster has one listed as a "USB 3.1 to MSATA & M2 SSD enclosure" which could be more interesting - does it accept PCI Express M.2 SSDs?

Minerva Innovation has a couple of interesting options, all listed with pairs of mSATA or M.2 ports, two with Type-C connections. What we don't know based on this data is if it supports PCIe M.2 SSDs or SATA only and if it supports RAID-0.

A couple more list dual SATA ports which might indicate that we are going to see multiple hard drives / SSDs over a single USB 3.1 connection but without RAID support. That could be another way to utilize the bandwidth of USB 3.1 in a similar way to how we planned to use Thunderbolt daisy chaining.

We don't have pricing yet, but I don't think USB 3.1 accessories will be significantly more expensive than what USB 3.0 devices sell for. So, does this list of accessories make you more excited to upgrade your system for USB 3.1?

Source: Various

Don't forget the 1TB Crucial BX100 costs less than $400

Subject: Storage | February 23, 2015 - 05:25 PM |
Tagged: ssd, SM2246EN, sata, micron, crucial, BX100, 1TB

It has been about a week since Al posted his review of the 256GB and 512GB models of the Crucial BX100 and what better way to remind you than with a review of the 1TB model, currently a mere $380 on Amazon (or only $374 on BHPhoto.com!).  Hardware Canucks cracked open the 1TB budget priced consumer level SSD for your enjoyment right here, as well as running it through a gamut of tests. As expected their results are in line with the 512GB model as they both use a 4 channel controller, which does mean they are slower than some competitors drives.  On the other hand the BX100 also has a significantly lower price making the 1TB model much more accessible for users.  Check out their post here.

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"Crucial's BX100 combines performance, endurance and value into one awesome budget-friendly SSD The best part? The 1TB version costs just $400."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Samsung Promises Another Fix for 840 EVO Slow Down Issue

Subject: Storage | February 20, 2015 - 06:21 PM |
Tagged: tlc, ssd, Samsung, 840 evo

Some of you may have been following our coverage of the Samsung 840 EVO slow down issue. We first reported on this issue last September, and Samsung issued a fix a couple of months later. This tool was effective in bringing EVOs back up to speed, but some started reporting their drives were still slowing down. Since our January follow up, we have been coordinating with Samsung on a possible fix. We actually sent one of our samples off to them for analysis, and have just received this statement: 
 
In October, Samsung released a tool to address a slowdown in 840 EVO Sequential Read speeds reported by a small number of users after not using their drive for an extended period of time. This tool effectively and immediately returned the drive’s performance to normal levels. We understand that some users are experiencing the slowdown again. While we continue to look into the issue, Samsung will release an updated version of the Samsung SSD Magician software in March that will include a performance restoration tool.
 
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A look at the reduced read speeds of stale data on an 840 EVO which had the original fix applied. Unpatched drives were slowing much further (50-100 MB/s).
 
So it appears that Samsung is still looking into the issue, but will update their Magician software to periodically refresh stale data until they can work out a more permanent fix that would correct all affected 840 EVOs. We have not heard anything about the other TLC models which have been reported to see this same sort of slow down, but we will keep you posted as this situation develops further.
Author:
Manufacturer: ASUS

Technology Background

Just over a week or so ago Allyn spent some time with the MSI X99A Gaming 9 ACK motherboard, a fact that might seem a little odd to our frequent readers. Why would our storage editor be focusing on a motherboard? USB 3.1 of course! When we visited MSI at CES in January they were the first company to show working USB 3.1 hardware and performance numbers that we were able duplicate in our testing when MSI sent us similar hardware.

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But ASUS is in this game as well, preparing its product lines with USB 3.1 support courtesy of the same ASMedia controller we looked at before. ASUS has a new revision of several motherboards planned with integrated on-board USB 3.1 but is also going to be releasing an add-in card with USB 3.1 support for existing systems.

Today we are going to test that add-in card to measure ASUS' implementation of USB 3.1 and see how it stacks up to what MSI had to offer and what improvements and changes you can expect from USB 3.0.

USB 3.1 Technology Background

Despite the simple point denomination change in USB 3.1, also known as SuperSpeed+, the technological and speed differences in the newest revision of USB are substantial. Allyn did a good job of summarizing the changes that include a 10 Gbps link interface and a dramatic drop in encoding overhead that enables peak theoretical performance improvements of 2.44x compared to USB 3.0.

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USB 3.1 is rated at 10 Gbps, twice that of USB 3.0. The little-reported-on nugget of info from the USB 3.1 specification relates to how they classify the raw vs. expected speeds. Taking USB 3.0 as an example, Superspeed can handle a raw 5Gbps data rate, but after subtracting out the overhead (packet framing, flow control, etc), you are left with ~450MB/s of real throughput. Superspeed+ upgrades the bit encoding type from 8b/10b (80% efficient) to 128b/132b (97% efficient) *in addition to* the doubling of raw data rate. This means that even after accounting for overhead, Superspeed+’s best case throughput should work out to ~1.1GB/s. That’s not a 2x speed improvement – it is actually 2.44x of USB 3.0 speed. Superspeed+ alright!

Continue reading our preview of USB 3.1 Performance on ASUS hardware!

An ARC 100 is down, 300TB past the warranty

Subject: Storage | February 16, 2015 - 04:48 PM |
Tagged: ocz, ARC 100, endurance

The sample size for the tests at KitGuru to see how well the OCZ ARC 100 SSDs stand up to their warranty are only five drives, now four as one has failed.  The ARC 100 is rated for 20GB/day of host writes for 3 years, a total of 21.9TB and this one made it to about 322TB of writes before succumbing to errors.  The other four are still going strong which lends credence to the claimed improvements that the Toshiba owned OCZ has made with their new SSD controllers.  Even if you do suffer the death of a drive during the warranty period of three years the new hassle free ShieldPlus Warranty makes it very easy for you to get a replacement.

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"The drives all passed the warranty figure of 300TB on 3rd February 2015 – but one of them has just failed with 322TB showing before failure."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: KitGuru
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Crucial

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction:

Micron's Crucial brand has been cranking out some great low cost SSDs for the past several years now. While their early drives pushed into the SATA 6Gb/sec interface before most of the competition, their performance was inconsistent and lagged behind some of the other more nimble solutions available at that time. This pattern was broken around the time of the M550 and MX100 launches. Those two drives were heavily competitive in performance and even moreso in pricing. Actually the pricing is probably the bigger story - when they launched, one of our readers caught a 512GB MX100 on sale for $125 ($0.24/GB)! We are coming up on a year since the MX100, and at CES 2015 Micron launched a pair of SSD models - the BX100 and MX200. Today we are going to look at the BX100 series:

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Crucial aims to make the BX100 as their lowest cost/GB SSD ever - even cheaper than the MX100. Since Micron makes the flash, the best way to drive costs down is to use a lower cost controller. The Silicon Motion SM2246EN is cheaper to procure than the equivalent Marvell part, yet still performs rather well.

SM2246EN Block Diagram.jpg

The Silicon Motion SM2246EN SSD controller

This is a great controller, as we have seen in our prior review of the ADATA SP610, Corsair Neutron LX, and Angelbird SSD WRK. From the specs, we can see that Micron has somehow infused their variant with increased write speeds even though it appears to use the same flash as those competing models listed above. We'll see how this plays out as the review progresses.

Read on for the full review!

Seagate and Micron become super best friends

Subject: Storage | February 13, 2015 - 02:47 PM |
Tagged: Seagate, micron

The large storage companies have been teaming up for a while now, not simply through mergers and takeovers but also joint ventures between those who were once competitors.  It is debatable if consumers will see much cost benefit from this cooperation but at least the products do seem to improve as specialties are combined.  In this particular case we will see the traditionally disk based Seagate working with the flash memory maker Micron develop SAS products as well as SSDs for Enterprise customers.  The idea of Serial attached SCSI SSDs is certainly interesting but in the current business environment you have to wonder how many companies will have the budget to invest in large scale migrations to flash based storage.  It is far more likely this will bring new hybrid storage servers to the market, with SSDs in the front to provide bandwidth to frequently accessed data with HDD behind them for backups and cold storage.  You can get a quick refresher on the other companies which have started cooperative ventures in the article at The Inquirer.

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"SEAGATE AND MICRON have announced that they will join forces to work on projects together over a number of years."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: MSI

Introduction and Background

We first got a peek of USB 3.1 at CES 2015. MSI had a cool demo showing some throughput figures including read and write speeds as high as 690 MB/s, well over the ~450 MB/s we see on USB 3.0 options shipping today. 

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We were of course eager to play around with this for ourselves, and MSI was happy to oblige, sending along a box of goodies:

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Stuff we will be testing today (Samsung T1 was not part of the MSI demo).

For those unaware, USB 3.1 (also known as Superspeed+), while only a 0.1 increment in numbering, incorporates a doubling of raw throughput and some dramatic improvements to the software overhead of the interface.

USB 3.1 speed.png

Don't be confused between the USB 3.1 standard and the new USB Type-C connector - they are unrelated and independent of each other.

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Yes, you’re all going to have to buy *more* cables in the future.

Type-C connectors will enable more simple cable design and thinner connections going forward but USB 3.1 will exist in both Type-A/B and Type-C going forward. Our benchmarking today will utilize Type-A.

Read on for some more detail and speed tests of this new specification.