LiteOn announces EP1 Series Enterprise M.2 PCIe SSDs

Subject: Storage | October 28, 2014 - 04:49 PM |
Tagged: ssd, pcie, M.2, LiteOn

In conjunction with Dell World, LiteOn has announced their new EP1 M.2 PCIe SSD:

EP1 pic.png

Designed primarily for enterprise workloads and usage, the EP1 sports impressive specs for such a small device. Capacities are 480 and 960GB, random 4k IO is rated at 150k/44k (R/W), sequentials are as high as 1.5GB/sec, and max latencies are in the 30-40 us range (this spec is particularly important for enterprise OLTP / transactional database workloads). Given the enterprise specs, power loss protection is a given (and you can see the capacitors in the upper right of the above photo). Here are the full specs:

EP1 specs.png

It should be noted that larger PCIe-based SSDs are rated for greater than the 1 drive write per day of the EP1, but they are also considerably larger (physically) when compared to the M.2 EP1. As an additional aside, the 960GB capacity is a bit longer than you might have seen so far in the M.2 form factor. While the 480GB model is a familiar 2280 (80mm long), the 960GB model follows the 22110 form factor (110mm long). The idle power consumption seems a bit high, but enterprise devices are typically tuned for instantaneous response over idle wattage.

Full press blast after the break.

Source: LiteOn

Samsung 850 EVO SKUs leaked, leads to initial pricing, specs

Subject: Storage | October 28, 2014 - 01:30 PM |
Tagged: ssd, sata, Samsung, 850 EVO

Thanks to an updated SKU list and some searching, we've come across some initial photos, specs, and pricing for the upcoming Samsung 850 EVO.

8310217.01.prod_.jpg

You may have heard of an 850 EVO 1TB listing over at Frys, but there's actually more information out there. Here's a quick digest:

Specs:

  • Memory: 3D VNAND
  • Read: 550MB/sec
  • Write: 520MB/sec
  • Weight: 0.29 lbs

Pricing (via Antares Pro listings at time of writing):

  • 120GB (MZ-75E120B/AM): $100 ($0.83 / GB)
  • 250GB (MZ-75E250B/AM): $146 ($0.58 / GB)
  • 500GB (MZ-75E500B/AM): $258 ($0.52 / GB)
  • 1TB     (MZ-75E1T0B/AM): $477 ($0.48 / GB)

In addition to the above, we saw the 1TB model listed for $500 at Frys, and also found the 500GB for $264 at ProVantage. The shipping date on the Frys listing was initially November 3rd, but that has since shifted to November 24th, presumably due to an influx of orders.

We'll be publishing a full capacity roundup on the 850 Pro in anticipation of the 850 EVO launch, which based on these leaks is imminent.

Connected Data announces Transporter Genesis Private Cloud Appliance

Subject: Storage | October 27, 2014 - 04:17 PM |
Tagged: Transporter Genesis, transporter, connected data

Connected Data (whose members are merged with Drobo), have really been pushing their new Transporter line. When we saw them this past CES, there was only a small desktop appliance meant to connect and sync files between homes or small offices. Now they are stepping up their Transporter game by scaling all the way up to 24TB rack mount devices!

Transporter Genesis_AG_L.jpg

For those unaware, Transporter is a personal cloud solution, but with software and mobile app support akin to that of Dropbox. Their desktop software tool has seen rapid addition of features, and the company has even rolled out version history support. Features are nice, but what will now set Transporter apart from competing options is scalability:

Transporter.png

The base level Transporter (right) is a relatively simple device with a single 2.5" HDD installed. These devices scale through the '5' and '15' models, which appear to be built on Drobo hardware. The 'Genesis' models (left) are not simply Drobo 1200i's with blue stickers on them, they are full blown Xeon systems with redundant power supplies, an 80GB SSD, up to 32GB or RAM and 24TB of raw storage capacity. Here is what a typical business rollout of Transporter might look like with these new additions at play:

Transporter2.png

Features currently supported across the line:

  • 256 Bit AES communication
  • Transporter Desktop software solution (Windows and Mac)
  • Transporter mobile app (iOS and Android)
  • Redundancy within each node ('5' and above)
  • Redundancy across nodes (via sync)
  • Active Directory support
  • No recurring fees

The 12TB Genesis 75 comes in at $9,999, but the '15' and '5' should prove to be lower cost options. The base model single bay Transporter can be found for just over $100 (BYOHDD). Full press blast after the break.

Trancend's new M.2 SSD, the MTS800

Subject: Storage | October 27, 2014 - 04:00 PM |
Tagged: M.2, ssd, transcend, MTS800

M.2 is quickly gaining popularity thanks to its small size and power requirements as well as the possible speed increase and other features.  Transcend's 128GB MTS800 drive features fill AES encryption, wear levelling and garbage collection as well as something new, StaticDataRefresh Technology.  That is their name for a process which automatically restores the charge levels in the NAND cells which both prevents errors from accumulating as well as performance reduction over time.  M.2 drives do come with a price premium, the 128GB model is available for $76 on Amazon but the performance is impressive, the lowest transfer speed The SSD Review saw during their testing was 265.61MB/s.

629x419xTranscend-MTS800.jpg

"We have been seeing more M.2 SSDs lately, a lot of which are companies’ first steps into the market since the form factor is so new. They have been designed to meet strict size requirements and allow for greater flexibility in product development. They are the perfect fit for mobile devices with their compact size and light weight."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Samsung updates 840 EVO Performance Restoration Tool

Subject: Storage | October 27, 2014 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, firmware, 840 evo

Over the weekend Samsung silently updated their 840 EVO Performance Restoration Tool. The incremental update improved support for some system configurations that were previously not recognizing an installed 840 EVO. Samsung also improved how the GUI progress bar responds during the update process, presumably to correct the near silent failure that occurred when the tool was unable to update the drive's firmware. Previously, the tool would halt at 15% without any clear indication that the firmware could not be updated (this would occur if the tool was unable to issue the necessary commands to the SSD, mainly due to the motherboard being in the wrong storage controller mode or using an incompatible storage driver).

DSC05837.JPG

Still no word on relief for those owners of the original 840 (non EVO or Pro). We've also heard from some users with Samsung OEM TLC-based SSDs that showed the same type of slow down (some variants of the PM851 apparently used TLC flash). More to follow there.

We evaluated the Samsung 840 EVO Performance Restoration Tool here. If you've already successfully run the 1.0 version of the tool, there is no need to re-run the 1.1 version, as it will not do anything additional to an EVO that has been updated and restored.

Source: Samsung

ICY DOCK on display with a nice array of drive accessories

Subject: Storage | October 17, 2014 - 05:06 PM |
Tagged: icy dock, ICY CUBE MB561U3S-4S, MB662U3-2S, external drive

Techgage has an assortment of Icy Dock products that they examined to make up this review. The ICY CUBE MB561U3S-4S is a 4-bay external drive enclosure, which will take all of the installed drives and create a single volume out of them.  This happens automatically, there are no other RAID options available when you use this particular dock but it does simplify the setup process.  The MB662U3-2S is a two bay enclosure which offers more choices for setup, you can set the drives to Large, JBOD, RAID 1 or RAID 0.  If you just have a single drive, they also have an external 3.5” SATA HDD enclosure and finally two HDD caddies which slide into a 5.25" drive bay. The first can be set up to fit a pair of 2.5" drives and the second is for hotswapping.  Check them out if you are in need of storage accessories.

icydock_4bay_raid_01_thumb.jpg

"It has been quite some time since we have looked to see what ICY DOCK has been up to. This is a company that established its reputation by making some very good hard drive accessories through the years. In this article we are going to take a look at several offerings from the company – from mobile to desktop. Let’s see what it has to offer."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Techgage
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Kingwin

Introduction and Features

2-Cloning.jpg

EZ-Clone in Standalone disk-cloning mode

Kingwin’s new EZ-Clone (Model: USI-2535CLU3) is a HDD/SSD adapter that can be used as a standalone disk-cloning device or as an external hard drive adapter. When used in standalone mode, the self-powered EZ-Cone can quickly clone one SATA/IDE drive to a new SATA drive in minutes (IDE to SATA or SATA to SATA) without being connected to a PC.

3-Ext-adapter.jpg

EZ-Clone being used as an external drive adapter

When used as an external drive adapter the EZ-Clone provides connectors for attaching two SATA drives (SSD or HDD) and one IDE hard drive in 2.5” or 3.5” form factors. The EZ-Clone adapter connects to a PC using the high-speed USB 3.0 interface. When used as an external drive adapter, the user can access up to two external drives at the same time (two SATA drives or one SATA and one IDE drive).

Kingwin EZ-Clone Key Features: (from the Kingwin website)
•    EZ-Clone model: USI-2535CLU3
•    External USB 3.0 to dual-SATA & single-IDE clone adapter
•    Standalone disk duplicator with One-Touch Clone Button (no PC required)
•    Supports 2.5” and 3.5” IDE and SATA drives (HDD or SSD)
•    Compatible with SATA I/II/III (1.5/3.0/6.0 Gbps)
•    SATA Drive Hot-swap compatibility
•    Supports hard drives up to 3TB disk size
•    Dual output power supply with standard 4-pin and SATA power connectors
•    Up to 5 Gbps data transfer rate with USB 3.0 (also compatible with USB 2.0)
•    USB Plug-and-play capability
•    2 Drive LEDs (red) and four Clone Progress LEDs (blue)
•    Screw-less, easy to attach connectors
•    Windows and Mac OS compatible (no driver installation required)
•    1-Year Warranty from Kingwin
•    MSRP $39.99 USD ($33.99 from Amazon.com, Oct. 2014)

4-usi_2535clu3_2.jpg

Please continue reading our review of the Kingwin EZ-Clone HDD/SSD adapter!!!

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Samsung

Introduction

** Edit **

The tool is now available for download from Samsung here. Another note is that they intend to release an ISO / DOS version of the tool at the end of the month (for Lunix and Mac users). We assume this would be a file system agnostic version of the tool, which would either update all flash or wipe the drive. We suspect it would be the former.

** End edit **

As some of you may have been tracking, there was an issue with Samsung 840 EVO SSDs where ‘stale’ data (data which had not been touched for some period of time after writing it) saw slower read speeds as time since written extended beyond a period of weeks or months. The rough effect was that the read speed of old data would begin to slow roughly one month after written, and after a few more months would eventually reach a speed of ~50-100 MB/sec, varying slightly with room temperature. Speeds would plateau at this low figure, and more importantly, even at this slow speed, no users reported lost data while this effect was taking place.

900x900px-LL-4985de76_2014-09-1720.18.26TestresultsforC_0.png

An example of file read speeds slowing relative to file age.

Since we first published on this, we have been coordinating with Samsung to learn the root causes of this issue, how they will be fixed, and we have most recently been testing a pre-release version of the fix for this issue. First let's look at the newest statement from Samsung:

Because of an error in the flash management software algorithm in the 840 EVO, a drop in performance occurs on data stored for a long period of time AND has been written only once. SSDs usually calibrate changes in the statuses of cells over time via the flash management software algorithm. Due to the error in the software algorithm, the 840 EVO performed read-retry processes aggressively, resulting in a drop in overall read performance. This only occurs if the data was kept in its initial cell without changing, and there are no symptoms of reduced read performance if the data was subsequently migrated from those cells or overwritten. In other words, as the SSD is used more and more over time, the performance decrease disappears naturally.  For those who want to solve the issue quickly, this software restores the read performance by rewriting the old data. The time taken to complete the procedure depends on the amount of data stored.

This partially confirms my initial theory in that the slow down was related to cell voltage drift over time. Here's what that looks like:

threshold shift.png

As you can see above, cell voltages will shift to the left over time. The above example is for MLC. TLC in the EVO will have not 4 but 8 divisions, meaning even smaller voltage shifts might cause the apparent flipping of bits when a read is attempted. An important point here is that all flash does this - the key is to correct for it, and that correction is what was not happening with the EVO. The correction is quite simple really. If the controller sees errors during reading, it follows a procedure that in part adapts to and adjusts for cell drift by adjusting the voltage thresholds for how the bits are interpreted. With the thresholds adapted properly, the SSD can then read at full speed and without the need for error correction. This process was broken in the EVO, and that adaptation was not taking place, forcing the controller to perform error correction on *all* data once those voltages had drifted near their default thresholds. This slowed the read speed tremendously. Below is a worst case example:

840 EVO 512 test hdtach-2-.png

We are happy to say that there is a fix, and while it won't be public until some time tomorrow now, we have been green lighted by Samsung to publish our findings.

Continue reading our look at the new Samsung 840 EVO performance restoration process!!

Another look at Micron's M600 series; the SSD that swings both ways

Subject: Storage | October 6, 2014 - 02:51 PM |
Tagged: ssd, slc, mlc, micron, M600, Dynamic Write Acceleration

The Tech Report took a different look at Micron's M600 SSD than Al did in his review.  Their benchmarks were focused more on a performance comparison versus the rest of the market, with over two dozen SSDs listed in their charts.  As you would expect the 1TB model outperformed the 256GB model but it was interesting to note that the 256GB MX100 outperformed the newer M600 in many tests.  In the final tally the new caching technology helped the 256GB model perform quite well but it was the 1TB model, which supposedly lacks that technology proved to be one of the fastest they have tested.

top.jpg

"Micron's new M600 SSD has a dynamic write cache that can treat any block on the drive as high-speed SLC NAND. This unique feature is designed to help lower-capacity SSDs keep up with larger drives that have more NAND-level parallelism, and we've tested the 256GB and 1TB versions to see how well it works."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Western Digital

Introduction and Test System Setup

A while ago, in our review of the WD Red 6TB HDD, we noted an issue with the performance of queued commands. This could potentially impact the performance of those drives in multithreaded usage scenarios. While Western Digital acted quickly to get updated drives into the supply chain, some of the first orders might have been shipped unpatched drives. To be clear, an unpatched 5TB or 6TB Red still performs well, just not as well as it *could* perform with the corrected firmware installed.

DSC05778.JPG

We received updated samples from WD, as well as applying a firmware update to the samples used in our original review. We were able to confirm that the update does in fact work, and brings a WD60EFRX-68MYMN0 to the identical and improved performance characteristics of a WD60EFRX-68MYMN1 (note the last digit). In this article we will briefly clarify those performance differences, now that we have data more consistent with the vast majority of 5 and 6TB Reds that are out in the wild.

Test System Setup

We currently employ a pair of testbeds. A newer ASUS P8Z77-V Pro/Thunderbolt and an ASUS Z87-PRO. Storage performance variance between both boards has been deemed negligible.

PC Perspective would like to thank ASUS, Corsair, and Kingston for supplying some of the components of our test rigs. 

 
Hard Drive Test System Setup
CPU Intel Core i7-4770K
Motherboard ASUS P8Z77-V Pro/TB / ASUS Z87-PRO
Memory Kingston HyperX 4GB DDR3-2133 CL9
Hard Drive G.Skill 32GB SLC SSD
Sound Card N/A
Video Card Intel® HD Graphics 4600
Video Drivers Intel
Power Supply Corsair CMPSU-650TX
Operating System Windows 8.1 X64 (Update 1)
  • PCMark Vantage and 7
  • Yapt
  • IOMeter
  • HDTach *omitted due to incompatibility with >2TB devices*
  • HDTune
  • PCPer File Copy Test

Read on for the updated performance figures of the WD 6TB Red.