Forget Cherryville, here's Jaycrest

Subject: Storage | February 8, 2013 - 07:25 PM |
Tagged: SF-2281 controller, Jaycrest, Intel, 335 Series, 240 GB, 20nm

The Intel 520 and 335 series are very similar, both using the SF-2281 controller with the difference being the flash chips.  The 335 uses the newly designed 20nm MLC flash which gives both higher storage density, retains the same 3,000 Program/Erase cycles as the 25nm 520 and it keeps the cost of the drives down.  [H]ard|OCP put it through tests similar to the battery of benchmarks Al did and it will come as no surprise that their results were similar as well.  This drive is never going to beat flagship SSDs in terms of raw performance but for readers who are unwilling to spend top dollar for an SSD the Intel 335 series allows you to pick up a 256GB SSD for under $200 without sacrificing anything but a bit of performance in certain specific usage scenarios.

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"Intel has released its new Intel 335 Series SSDs featuring 20nm MLC NAND and a SandForce SF-2281 processor. Its new MLC NAND boasts impressive power and write specifications. This SSD is geared for the budget market, but will it be able to compete with low-cost TLC alternatives?"

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Subject: Storage

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction

With newer and faster SSDs coming to market, we should not forget those capable controllers of yesteryear. There are plenty of folks out there cranking out products based on controllers that were until very recently the king of the hill. Competition is great for the market, and newer product launches have driven down the cost of the older SandForce 2281 SATA 6Gb/sec controller. ADATA makes a product based on this controller, and it's high time we gave it a look:

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The ADATA XPG SX900 launched mid last year, and was ADATA's first crack at the eXtended capacity variant of the SandForce firmware. This traded off some of the spare area in the interest of more capacity for the consumer.

Read on for the full review!

Intel Launches New 335 Series SSD In 180GB Capacity

Subject: Storage | February 5, 2013 - 03:16 AM |
Tagged: ssd, SandForce SF-2281, sandforce, mlc, intel 335, Intel

Intel has added a new drive to its existing 335 SSD series. The new drive offers up 180GB of storage, but maintains the same level of read and write performance as its larger 240GB sibling.

Intel 335 Series 180GB SSD.jpg

The 180GB version uses 20nm MLC NAND flash paired with a SandForce SF-2281 controller. According to the Intel-provided spec sheet (PDF), the new drive is capable of sustained read and write speeds of 500 MB/s and 450 MB/s respectively. Further, the drive maxes out at 42,000 random read IOPS and 52,000 random write IOPS.

The drive will come in the 2.5” form factor, but is 9.5mm thick (meaning it will not work in all notebooks). Reportedly, Intel has redesigned the casing to include a schematic/blueprint graphic alongside the Intel logo.

Intel rates the 180GB 335 series SSD at 1.2 million MTBF and is warranted for three years. The drive can currently be found online for around $180, making it right around the $1/GB mark. Interestingly, the larger 240GB model is currently retailing for around $195. Therefore, if you can spare the extra $15, the 240GB model is the better deal.

Source: Intel

Kingston updates their SSDNow lineup

Subject: Storage | February 4, 2013 - 02:09 PM |
Tagged: kingston, ssdnow v300, SF-2281 controller, mlc

Kingston's updated SSDNow V300 uses 19nm Toshiba Toggle NAND and the SandForce 2281 controller with some unspecified enhancements.  Kingston has made a name for themselves in the SSD market for offering an easy and fully explained upgrade path for users who are unfamiliar with changing hard drives.  The updated version is no different, included is an external enclosure for the SSD and a USB cable to allow users to easily copy over any data which is of great benefit for users who don't have several enclosures laying around.  [H]ard|OCP's testing showed that even though this is a value priced drive, it also performs better than a lot of the competition.

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"The Kingston SSDNow V300 is yet another value-oriented SSD in Kingston's wildly successful line of mainstream solid state drives. With the pressures of TLC SSDs squeezing the value market we take a look and see if a standard MLC SSD with 19nm Toshiba Toggle NAND and an SF-2281 processor can keep up with the changing times."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Subject: Storage
Tagged: Intel, ssd, 525, msata

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction

It has been just under a year since Intel released their 520 Series SSD, which was their second 6 Gb/sec SATA unit. Sporting a SandForce controller, that release helped bridge a high speed storage gap in their product lineup. One year prior, Intel dabbled in the mSATA form factor, releasing a 310 Series model under that moniker. The 310 showed up here and there, but never really caught on as the physical interface was admittedly before its time. While in hindsight it was a very good way to go towards establishing a fixed standard, the industry had already begun fragmenting on these smaller interfaces. The MacBook Air had already launched with a longer 'GumStick' shaped SSD, and Ultrabook makers were following suit with units that were physically identical yet not pin-compatible with that used in the Apple product.

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The Intel 520 Series SSD helped push Intel into 6Gb/sec SATA territory.

It's taken a while for the industry to favor defragmentation (pun intended) enough for mSATA to really start catching on, and that time appears to be nearing with Intel's launch of the SSD 525 Series:

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Read on for the full review!

Fit in three for the price of two with Icy Dock's SATA cage

Subject: Storage | January 24, 2013 - 06:41 PM |
Tagged: icy dock, MB153SP-B FatCage, sata 6Gps

Do you find yourself wishing you had more space to put in an additional three 3.5" HDDs and have nothing to do with a pair of 5.25" bays?  Icy Dock has a solution for you with the FatCage MB153SP-B which takes up two 5.25" bays and can fit three 3.5" SATA drives, even better it can run them with only two SATA power connectors.  Thanks to the easy opening front this might just be the easiest way to add hotswap drive to your machine without needing anything hanging off of the outside of your box.  As you can see from the rear shot, the drives are actively cooled and Pro-Clockers did indeed test the compatibility of 2.5" to 3.5" SSD adapters with no problems whatsoever.

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"There are several manufacturers of such devices but we have one of the better ones on tap for you today. Icy Dock has been doing this for over fifteen years and has become a leader at it. FatCage MB153SP-B is one of several models coming from Icy Dock; the series would include the DataCage Basic and the FlexCage. Each having their own unique features, so we will try and get them into the lab so we can give you more insight on them."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Pro-Clockers

Intel's got a new SSD controller to show off to enterprises

Subject: Storage | January 17, 2013 - 03:05 PM |
Tagged: DC S3700, Intel, ssd, HET MLC, enterprise ssd

Before getting into the speed of the new Intel DC S3700 SSD, take a moment to consider the expected lifespan of the HET MLC flash, it was described to hardCOREware as "10 full drive writes per day over the 5-year life of the drive".  Now that will not have a big impact on home users, but Enterprise and image/video editors will certainly take note as moving that much data is a common occurrence for those businesses and the questionable lifespan of some flash memory has been contributed to the slow pace at which SSDs have been taken up by large businesses.  With the Intel name behind these drives, an assurance of long term usability and the impressive steady state performance they provide you may soon see these in a server room near you.

HCW intel-SSD-DC-S3700-800gb-disassembled.jpg

"The Intel SSD DC S3700 introduces a new Intel SSD controller for the first time in years. With a heavy emphasis on consistent performance, these drives bode well for the future of Intel SSD products. It may also refresh your opinion on some current SSDs that don't perform as consistently as others once they enter a steady state."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: hardCOREware

CES 2013: Micron demos DDR4 DIMMs, announces 20nm Crucial M500 SSDs at $0.60/GB

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | January 10, 2013 - 11:12 AM |
Tagged: micron, crucial, ces 2013, CES

At the Micron/Crucial, we were shown an expansion to their DDR3 memory line, to include lower profile parts:

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These reduced height modules should make for easier installation into HTPC and other small form factor PCs and even 1U Servers.

Next we saw DDR4 running at its native 2133 MHz speed. Here is what the DDR4 DIMM looks like:

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Note the slight bulge at the center of the pin area. This is to make installation easier, as there is a considerable increase in pin count, which would have made installation more difficult if not for that design feature. Note the increased contact density in this pic:

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Last (and most certainly not least), Micron announced their next SSD Series, the M500. This line uses a newer Marvell controller with Micron engineered firmware, driving 20nm IMFT flash:

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All models will employ the enterprise feature of a capacitor bank used to store some reserve power. This helps to minimize any possible data loss should power be interrupted while data is being written:

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Micron told me they are planning a 1TB model, running *MLC* flash (not TLC), and they are shooting for a price point of $600. That's $0.60/GB! If this scales down at the lower capacity points, we should be in for some pretty nice price dips in Solid State Storage for 2013!

 

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

CES 2013: Western Digital thin 5mm and 7mm hard drives now also come in hybrid SSHD!

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | January 9, 2013 - 10:03 PM |
Tagged: CES, ces 2013, western digital, wdc, sshd, hybrid, 5mm, 7mm

Today Western Digital showed me their new 5mm and 7mm mobile hard drives. These are very thin, intended for Ultrabooks, and come not only in the familiar Blue product line, but also in a new Solid State Hard Drive (SSHD). The new thin hybrid models are dubbed WD Black. The 5mm Blue and Black will be available in 500GB capacities:

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Adding another 500GB to reach a 1TB capacity point requires another platter, and therefore another 2mm, bringing the 1TB Blue and Black to 7mm:

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The WD Black SSHD will come with either 16 ot 24GB of flash memory cache (varying based on OEM configuration / request). More to follow on these once we can get some hours logged on their new models.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

 

CES 2013: OCZ reworks product lines, releases PCIe-based Vector SSD

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | January 8, 2013 - 09:30 PM |
Tagged: vector PCIe, vector, ocz, ces 2013, CES

Today at CES, OCZ released the Vector PCIe SSD:

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This is essentially a RevoDrive, still using VCA 2.0 as the method of tying a pair of SSDs together, only in this case OCZ has ditched SandForce in favor of their new Indilinx parts lifted from their Vector Series. I witnessed the pre-release part turning in 160,000 4k random read IOPS and upwards of 1GB/sec sequential throughput.

OCZ was also showing a new iteration of their VXL enterprise caching software:

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The new software, dubbed LXL, is currently in beta testing. LXL is linux based and employs a caching driver to tie the SSD into the SAN or other local storage. The benefit is that there is also a user-land application and GUI that can 'tune' the caching driver based on default and custom scripts. This tuneability lets the administrator control what sort of data gets cached based on the expected workloads placed on the storage system. This prevents infrequently accessed data from pushing the speed-critical content out of the cache, and should prove more effective than typical caching drivers which are generally unintelligent on their own.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!